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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 6, 1997
BOSTON -- Boy, do we hate being lied to. If you want to see the "pack mentality" of journalists in full operation, lie to one of us, sit back and wait for the howl.This sound wave broke over Ron Fitzsimmons, executive director of the National Coalition of Abortion Providers, when he admitted that he had "lied through my teeth" about so-called partial-birth abortions.He had said -- through his teeth -- that only a few hundred such procedures were performed a year when he knew there were several thousand.
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NEWS
By Patrick Whelan and Kathleen Kennedy Townsend | November 16, 2008
Catholics voted decisively in this month's election for Barack Obama, 54 percent to 45 percent, according to exit polls. This was a big reversal from four years ago, when Catholics favored George W. Bush by 5 percentage points. Now the debate is on. The U.S. Bishops, meeting last week in Baltimore, wrestled with the implications of election results that showed Catholics rejecting the dictates of the most conservative and outspoken bishops, who urged parishioners to vote Republican. The putative argument for these bishops was that only Republicans are sufficiently pure on the abortion question.
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NEWS
By MONA CHAREN | July 31, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON defended his veto of the partial-birth abortion ban in his usual style -- with lies and misrepresentations. He has not thus far been held to account for the veto or its misleading justification.Let's recall that partial-birth abortions are performed after the 20th week of pregnancy. The baby is turned into a breech position inside the womb and then pulled out of the birth canal by the feet. When only the baby's head remains in the uterus, the doctor punctures the skull with scissors and then inserts a tube to suck the baby's brains out.A nurse who observed one of these abortions recalled seeing the almost completely delivered baby's body moving, "its tiny hands clasping and unclasping."
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | January 21, 2008
The abortion debate has raged since 1973, when the Supreme Court gave abortion constitutional protection, but the basic law of the land has proved immutable. Abortion is legal, and it's going to remain legal for a long time. Laws often alter attitudes, inducing people to accept things - such as racial integration - they once rejected. But sometimes, attitudes move in the opposite direction, as people see the consequences of the change. That's the case with abortion. The news that the abortion rate has fallen to its lowest level in 30 years elicits various explanations, from increased use of contraceptives to lack of access to abortion clinics.
NEWS
March 19, 1997
Regarding your March 2 editorial ''Abortion again,'' you just don't get it; it's not ''again,'' it's ''still.''While your publication tends to downplay any activity on the pro-life side, there has been a rather substantial march in Washington for 24 years protesting Roe v. Wade.You continue to promote the big lie of abortion, the health of the mother exception. You describe it as legislators having ''. . . placed responsible restrictions on late-term procedures.''In practice, this ''health exception'' produces carte blanche clearance for abortionists to perform any and all third-trimester abortions.
NEWS
June 5, 1998
WHEN Congress and state legislatures debate bills that would ban so-called "partial-birth" abortions, supporters of such legislation like to assure doubters that it would apply only to a particular kind of abortion.Yet when physicians and judges examine these laws, they often find the wording vague enough to apply to far more abortions than the relative few that are ostensibly targeted. Some 28 states have passed "partial-birth" abortion bans since 1995, and most of them have been challenged in court.
NEWS
February 18, 1998
ON ONE POINT, supporters and opponents of legalized abortion can agree: Any late-term abortion procedure is difficult, both physically and morally.In Maryland, as in many other states, abortions are already illegal past the point at which a fetus can survive outside the womb -- a point reached late in the second trimester of pregnancy. The power to make such decisions was reserved to the states in Roe vs. Wade, the Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion in the early stages of pregnancy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 27, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Failing to override a presidential veto yesterday, the Senate kept legal a form of late-term abortion.Anti-abortion groups vowed retribution at the polls in November.Three senators switched sides to oppose the procedure that opponents call "partial-birth" abortion and doctors call "intact dilation and extraction." But the drive to overturn President Clinton's veto of a ban on the procedure still fell eight votes short.The vote was 57-41, well shy of the two-thirds needed to override the veto.
NEWS
March 2, 1997
MARYLANDERS who thought they had settled the abortion question with a decisive vote in 1992 are sorry to learn that the issue is alive again in the General Assembly.A bill ostensibly designed to ban a particular kind of abortion procedure, known as "partial-birth abortion," is making headway in a Senate committee.The "partial-birth" issue has been a bonanza for abortion opponents because descriptions are just graphic enough to repulse the public, but line drawings illustrating the procedure are not so graphic that they cannot be published.
NEWS
March 9, 1997
OPPONENTS OF abortion have seized on the issue of "partial-birth" procedures as an effective tool for undermining support for legalized abortion. Although most states already have restrictions on late-term abortions -- a power specifically designated to states in Supreme Court rulings -- Congress appears poised to enact a federal law on the subject.Maryland bans post-viability (third trimester and late second-trimester) abortions except in cases of danger to the life or health of the mother, or severe fetal deformity.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 17, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO -- Jason Baier talks often to the little boy he calls Jamie. He imagines this boy - his son - with blond hair and green eyes, chubby cheeks, a sweet smile. But he'll never know for sure. His fiancee's sister told him about the abortion after it was over. Baier remembers that he cried. The next weeks and months go black. He knows he drank far too much. He and his fiancee fought until they broke up. "I hated the world," he said. Baier, 36, still longs for the child who might have been, with an intensity that bewilders him: "How can I miss something I never even held?"
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | August 3, 2007
FREDERICK -- Diners at Ruby Tuesday were greeted this week by a grisly sight: the enormous image of the mangled half-formed skull of an aborted fetus. Blown up large, bigger than an adult, the graphic "photo" was one of more than a dozen signs held up on the sidewalk along U.S. 40. The scene -- repeated across the region from Towson to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington -- is part of Defend Life's weeklong "Face the Truth Tour," a multistop, anti-abortion rally that aims to shock Maryland voters into changing their views on the procedure.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 27, 2007
BOSTON -- Let us return to that wonderful yesterday when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Myra Bradwell couldn't be two things at the same time: a lawyer and a woman. On that occasion, Justice Joseph P. Bradley left a perfect entry for the Father Knows Best time capsule, circa 1873: "Man is, or should be, woman's protector and defender. The natural and proper timidity and delicacy which belongs to the female sex evidently unfits it for many of the occupations of civil life." Justice Bradley went on to explain why this decision couldn't be in the hands of the woman.
NEWS
April 22, 2007
A shift in strategy of abortion opponents was critical: Exploit the perceived barbarity of the partial-birth abortion procedure and direct efforts to outlaw it. President Bush, though a disappointment to many conservatives, contributed to the fight by appointing John G. Roberts Jr. and Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. And last week, the two justices did their part by helping swing the court toward a major restriction of abortion rights, a 5-4 decision that upheld the federal ban on partial-birth abortion and extended the court's jurisdiction to "the life of the unborn."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 20, 2007
BOSTON -- May I remind you what else was happening on the very day in 2003 when Congress passed the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act? In Florida, the Legislature passed a law that gave politicians the power to override Terri Schiavo's wishes and have her feeding tube reinserted. Up and down the East Coast, under two Bush administrations - George's and Jeb's - politicians were playing doctor and God and patient, trumping medical opinion and individual rights. May I also remind you of the day President Bush signed the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban bill into law?
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Frank D. Roylance and Liz Bowie and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporters | April 20, 2007
Maryland legislators on both sides of the abortion issue say the state is not likely to change its liberal abortion law despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that cleared the way for more restrictive state laws. This week the court upheld a ban on a late-term procedure that critics call "partial-birth abortion." Some physicians characterized the ruling as an intrusion by politicians and judges into the medical profession, saying it interferes with a physician's ability to safely care for patients.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1996
In a rare display of political pressure, all eight of America's Roman Catholic cardinals and 50 bishops from across the country gathered on the steps of Congress and urged lawmakers to override President Clinton's veto of the ban on late-term "partial-birth" abortions.Cardinal William H. Keeler of the Archdiocese of Baltimore led a prayer at the vigil and brought to the Capitol dozens of boxes of petitions signed last weekend by 200,000 Catholics in parishes across Maryland.Each box, stacked in a short, long wall as a backdrop for the vigil, had signs taped to the front directed at Maryland's U.S. senators, Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court changed course on abortion yesterday and cleared the way for states to pass laws designed to discourage women from ending their pregnancies. In a 5-4 decision, the court said the "government has a legitimate and substantial interest in preserving and promoting fetal life." The ruling upheld a federal ban on a disputed midterm abortion method that critics call "partial-birth abortion." Seven years ago, the court, also by a 5-4 margin, struck down a nearly identical state law on the grounds that it could force some women to undergo riskier surgery during the fourth or fifth month of a pregnancy.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A Bush administration lawyer urged the Supreme Court yesterday to uphold the nation's first criminal ban on an abortion method, saying so-called "partial birth" abortions are "too close to infanticide" and not a medical necessity. "Safe alternatives are always available," U.S. Solicitor General Paul D. Clement said in defending a law passed by Congress in 2003. But two abortion-rights advocates argued that the ban, if put into effect, would unwisely limit the options of doctors who perform abortions in the second trimester and would expose some pregnant women to more dangerous surgery.
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