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By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | May 21, 1995
There's more news about those upstart Time Radicals.A few weeks ago, the Time Saver looked at time issues among women and members of the 13th Generation -- that is, the group born between 1961 and 1981, in the 13th generation since the country was founded. A study by Demos, a British think tank, showed both groups wanted more freedom to arrange their work schedules so they could produce quality work that meets deadlines, but without the rigidity of traditional office-bound work hours. Thus the name Time Radicals.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Adjunct faculty members at the Maryland Institute College of Art voted to unionize this week, creating the first union representing part-time faculty members at any four-year college in the state. The MICA adjuncts began organizing in March amid dissatisfaction with what some lecturers called shaky job security and insufficient wages. Mailed-in ballots were tallied at the board's Baltimore office Tuesday by a representative of the National Labor Relations Board, with witnesses from MICA's administration and the part-time faculty committee observing the process.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. has proposed giving expanded vacation, sick leave and paid holidays to government employees who work between 30 and 39 hours a week. The county employs hundreds of such workers, mostly in social services jobs that are funded at least partly by grant money. But because these employees are not considered part of the county's merit system, they earn fewer benefits and enjoy less job security, which has led to complaints and lawsuits. One of those suits, brought by four part-time employees, was dismissed by a Baltimore County judge last summer but is scheduled for a hearing today at the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
The vote is in: Maryland Institute College of Art 's part-time faculty have chosen to unionize as Service Employees International Union (SEIU) 500. Two weeks ago, ballots were sent out by the National Labor Relations Board to all members of the part-time faculty. There was one question on the ballot: Should MICA's part-time faculty organize itself as an independent union with the power to negotiate? The ballots arrived at the doorsteps of 350 faculty members. Voters marked the box. They put them in a provided envelope.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. has proposed giving expanded vacation, sick leave and paid holidays to government employees who work between 30 and 39 hours a week. The county employs hundreds of such workers, mostly in social services jobs that are funded at least partly by grant money. But because these employees are not considered part of the county's merit system, they have fewer benefits and enjoy less job security, which has led to complaints and lawsuits. One of those lawsuits, brought by four part-time employees, was dismissed by a Baltimore County judge last summer but is scheduled for a hearing today by the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1995
At first glance, hiring retired Anne Arundel County police officers as part-time deputy sheriffs looks like a good idea. That is, of course, until you look at the fine print in county pension laws.Sheriff George F. Johnson IV would like to hire retired county officers to fill an unspecified number of part-time deputy positions in his office and augment his force of 32 full-time and 20 part-time deputies.But, under current law, retired officers who accept positions will lose $1 of their pension for every $2 they earn working part time, said E. Hilton Wade Jr., personnel director.
BUSINESS
By Bonnie Miller Rubin and Bonnie Miller Rubin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
As the economy sputters and employers try to do more with less, the much-vaunted "Mommy Track" may be veering off course. In prosperous times, when the labor pool was smaller, employees seeking work/family balance could easily secure part-time work, job sharing and generous leaves. Now, job applicants are a dime a dozen and corporate America is asking everyone to work faster, longer, harder. The result? Parents who have negotiated for fewer hours say they feel under increased pressure to put in more work, causing some to call it quits.
NEWS
By Michael Moses and Praveen Nayyar | November 23, 1997
Early in the next millennium, part-time work will likely be the norm in the United States rather than the exception. If properly planned, part-time employment can be a win-win proposition for employers and employees.About 20 percent of today's workers hold a part-time job, but trends will cause that share to increase for both white-collar and blue-collar employment. Several reasons exist for the shift, including continued growth in the service component of our economy.Meanwhile, demand patterns will remain highly individual and variable, the pressures of worldwide competition will increase and Americans will continue to demand individual lifestyle choices.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2003
A lawsuit brought by four Baltimore County employees is starting to gain national attention among workers' advocates and labor lawyers, who call it a prime example of workers fighting what they say is local governments' increasingly manipulative employment practices. In their lawsuit, county employees Julianne O'Connor, Julianne Uehlinger, Janice Zimmerman and Gail Jett ask the court system to get involved in a longstanding debate over Baltimore County's practice of labeling some county workers "part time," even though they work as many hours as their full-time counterparts.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
For the past year, the Office of Personnel Management has been working on regulations that will allow older federal workers to phase into retirement. The idea is that these employees would continue to work part time, collect a partial pension — and pass on their knowledge and experience to the next generation of federal workers . Many older workers are eagerly awaiting the program's launch. "A lot of retirement-eligible workers don't feel ready to retire," said Jessica Klement, legislative director of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association.
NEWS
December 18, 2013
With public approval ratings for most political figures suffering these days - Congress is hovering around 9 percent, an all-time low - and unemployment still relatively high, it's probably not the best time for elected officials of any kind to seek a pay raise. Yet legislative salaries are now under review in Annapolis and are likely to become an issue in the upcoming legislative session. Lawmaker pay is an easy target for criticism. Rare is the voter who is left wide awake at night fretting that his delegate or state senator is paid too little.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
For the past year, the Office of Personnel Management has been working on regulations that will allow older federal workers to phase into retirement. The idea is that these employees would continue to work part time, collect a partial pension — and pass on their knowledge and experience to the next generation of federal workers . Many older workers are eagerly awaiting the program's launch. "A lot of retirement-eligible workers don't feel ready to retire," said Jessica Klement, legislative director of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association.
NEWS
June 23, 2013
Letter writer John Murphy contends that religious freedom is not under threat because we have Catholics in government ("Lori's views outside the Catholic mainstream," June 19). These politicians are only Catholics when it is convenient and do not adhere to major church policies against abortion and gay marriage. I do not expect these Catholics In Name Only (CINO) to promote church doctrine in politics, but they should not take the lead against church teachings. For example: the change of the definition of marriage in Maryland would not have passed without the leadership and fund raising of Gov. Martin O'Malley.
FEATURES
By Lisa Mathias and For The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
In case you hadn't heard, it is Screen-Free Week . No computers. No televisions. No hand-held devices. (All of this comes with one caveat: your kids can use "screens" to do homework. It isn't like you have to break out the old encyclopedias or go to the public library or anything drastic like that.) To all of you are participating this week, I say: "Go for it!" I won't invite your kids over and show them a cool new video on YouTube or ask if they want to see Orioles' games highlights.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
As thousands of federal workers prepare to be furloughed, many are concerned about how to deal with a pay cut. Keith Everett, a chief steward with the American Federation of Government Employees, said his union held two meetings in recent weeks at Fort Meade for workers, many of whom had the same financial questions: Can I apply for unemployment benefits? Will I receive back pay if lawmakers eventually reach some agreement on budget cuts? The answers: No and no. "Everyone is hoping [lawmakers]
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
The chair of the Maryland Republican Party admits he erred by not disavowing his congressional campaign before he started working part-time for Rep. Roscoe Bartlett in June. Alex Mooney began raising money last year for a 2012 bid for Maryland's Sixth District seat, which Bartlett currently holds. After Bartlett announced he was running again - he is a 10-term incumbent in the Western Maryland district - Mooney filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission indicating that he was holding onto the funds he had raised for a 2014 campaign.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | February 6, 2005
I manage a small company with five full-time employees and four part-timers. My boss holds the part-timers' hours to no more than 15 a week because he believes more time would require him to pay benefits. But I don't agree. When I was a corporate manager, the minimum for benefits was 20 hours a week. I think my boss doesn't want to pay for more hours, though we need the help. As your example shows, companies define what part time looks like. That's because federal labor laws don't address the issue.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 21, 1998
Part-time workers earn lower hourly wages and are far less likely than full-timers to have health insurance, pension coverage, paid vacations and other "safety net" job protections, the AFL-CIO says.About 21 million workers, nearly 18 percent of the U.S. work force, say their primary job is part time, according to the AFL-CIO report "Part-Time Work, Full-Time Bills: The Problems of Part-Time Employment."The report was released this week in connection with an attempt to unionize about 5,000 part-time workers at Disney World.
NEWS
By Lynne Elkes | January 16, 2012
A significant issue that permeates higher education is the need for better preparation for a substantial sector of the instructional workforce: occasional, part-time, and non-tenure-track instructors, known generally as adjunct faculty. Most colleges and universities rely upon this group to offer numerous courses to both undergraduate and graduate students, since it offers universities a means to serve a rapidly growing number of students in a cost-effective manner. However, little attention has been paid to ensure that adjunct faculty members have the tools they need to be effective in the classroom, and this cohort is often viewed as an appendage rather than as a vital component of a campus community.
SPORTS
By George Diaz, Tribune newspapers | September 7, 2011
As Danica Patrick makes the transition from the open-wheel world to NASCAR nation, she will have an excellent mentor. Tony Stewart will be her team owner while she races a select number of Cup races. Another mentor couldn't hurt. Mark Martin, anybody? It seems like a great fit. Martin will be looking for a part-time ride after he steps aside for Kasey Kahne at Hendrick Motorsports. "I would love to have him," Stewart said. "The biggest thing is us getting the financial backing to run the remainder of those races.
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