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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 8, 1995
"Father of the Bride: Part II" is less a movie than a series of blackout sketches depicting how hard pregnancy is on men. It's about a guy about to become a father and a grandfather simultaneously, though not with the same woman, thank God.It helps enormously -- in fact it is the whole movie -- that the man in question is Steve Martin as we know and love him the best: loose-jointed, dithery, stumblingly vulnerable and silly, self-deluding, as close to an Everydad as anyone could imagine.The film follows on the 1991 success "Father of the Bride," which in turn traces its lineage back to the early '50s film with Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and a youngster named Elizabeth Taylor.
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NEWS
January 13, 2014
From the Baltimore Sun Op-Ed Page When trying to get business here in the state of Maryland, corporations knew that the most direct path to the heart of Governor Martin O'Malley was  through the Democratic Governor's Association . January Red Maryland Poll Larry Hogan won the Red Maryland poll for the second consecutive month, getting 30.5 percent of the vote. Delegate Ron George finished second with 26.8 percent of the vote. Click here to view the results in their entirety . Stockholm Syndrome Greg Kline points out the  Stockholm Syndrome that pervades Republicans in the State Senate  when only one senator bothers to vote against Senate President Mike Miller.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By STEPHEN HUNTER | December 7, 1995
"Father of the Bride: Part II""Father of the Bride: Part II" lets Steve Martin and Martin Short indulge in some large-scale comic shtick as it follows the arc by which Martin becomes both a father and a grandfather in the same nine months -- he's so happy his daughter is pregnant, he gets his wife pregnant! PG-13"Party Girl""Party Girl" is a New York item that follows as Parker Posey, playing a librarian, has an amusing career by night as a club hopper. R
NEWS
July 8, 2013
I have just one question for the writer of the editorial about Egypt's military coup ("Egypt's revolution, Part II," July 4): Why is it any of our business what the generals or the public in Egypt do next? Holding generals to promises there is what gets us hated around the world for interfering in other countries' affairs. That's the purpose of the UN, not the U.S.A. F. Cordell, Lutherville
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | February 27, 2008
Subject: Long-haired male. If you go CSI: Beethoven will be presented at 7:30 tonight (Part I) and 7:30 p.m. tomorrow (Part II) at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $20. Call 410-783-8000 or go to bsomusic.org.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1997
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15.Q. A few years ago I had a large loss, and since then have been deducting $3,000 a year long-term capital loss on Schedule D. Now I have to report a capital gain by a mutual fund I own. Do I record that in the same section of Part II? It said you record it under long-term capital gains and losses. Does that go into the same section? Do I subtract my gain from my loss and just record the balance?
NEWS
July 8, 2013
I have just one question for the writer of the editorial about Egypt's military coup ("Egypt's revolution, Part II," July 4): Why is it any of our business what the generals or the public in Egypt do next? Holding generals to promises there is what gets us hated around the world for interfering in other countries' affairs. That's the purpose of the UN, not the U.S.A. F. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 10, 2008
To explain what he loves about The Godfather: Part II, which plays every day at the Senator for a week (between screenings of The Godfather), the man who restored the entire Godfather trilogy, Robert A. Harris, uses an analogy from a more frivolous pop phenomenon: the Indiana Jones series. "I had a great time at Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull," he says, "but what I liked most about it was that moment in the warehouse in the opening sequence, when Indy knocks into this big box and it partially rips open and you see it contains the Ark of the Covenant."
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 15, 2008
It's rare, indeed, that a Hollywood sequel is as good, or better than, the original film - rarer still when the original is one of the greatest American films ever. All the more reason to cherish The Godfather: Part II, which airs tonight, immediately after The Godfather, on AMC. About 1972's The Godfather (8 p.m.), there are few superlatives left to throw around. Suffice it to say that it's one of those films that demands to be seen, lest one be accused of cultural ignorance. A culmination of the 1960s-era trend of turning bad guys into heroes, Francis Ford Coppola's masterpiece fires on every cylinder: great acting (Marlon Brando is every bit as good as his reputation suggests)
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOK EDITOR | July 3, 1999
Mario Puzo, godfather of the Godfathers, died yesterday at home in Bay Shore, Long Island. His 78-year-old heart failed, those close to him said.You might say it was business: He had suffered a near-fatal heart attack in 1991 in Las Vegas, a city he loved for its gaming and its richer associated cultures. Quadruple-bypass surgery then sent him back to the keyboard. He soon began work on "The Last Don" (1996) his eighth novel. Shortly before he died, his agent and editors said, he completed a ninth, "Omerta," scheduled for publication in July 2000.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Egyptian army tanks are rumbling through the streets of Cairo in an ominous show of force that leaves little doubt that the country's fledgling experiment in democracy has been seriously disrupted. The whereabouts of President Mohamed Morsi, the country's first democratically elected leader, are unknown, and the generals directing what the president's advisors have condemned as a "military coup" have yet to fully explain their intentions. The political situation is still very much in flux.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | November 15, 2012
Until this episode, Dr. Arden was the most evil man running around Briarcliff. That title now belongs to Dr. Oliver Thredson, who is finally revealed as Bloody Face. Ryan Murphy did a great job hiding the identity of Bloody Face to this point. Thredson seemed to be the most genuinely humane person working in the asylum, which isn't saying much considering its run by former Nazis, other killers and a promiscuous nun who hit a young girl while driving drunk.  So how did we come to find out that Dr. Thredson is doing his best impression of Buffalo Bill?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 25, 2012
If you're used to watching an Orioles game in the quiet of a family room, then watching one at Camden Yards can be unsettling - fellow fans yelling in your ears, maybe dropping a profanity here and there. If you rarely walk on city sidewalks full of people, it can be a strange experience, especially if there are panhandlers or mentally ill wanderers in your path. If you're almost always with people who look like you, then being in a diverse crowd can be weird, even frightening. It was always thus, but never more so than in the last few decades in the United States.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
This is the second installment of a three-part series in which Baltimore Sun reporter Matt Vensel examines the Ravens and how each area of the team can be improved this offseason. He will look at the Ravens' special teams unit in Saturday's paper. The Ravens' defense was the team's best unit in 2011, ranking among the NFL's elite in sacks, scoring defense and yards allowed per game. But you could argue that the defense has the most question marks entering this offseason.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011
There's a little bit more to that fish tale I gave you the other day. Karen Blair, a longtime aide whom William Donald Schaefer remembered in his will, recalled how she'd gotten roped into playing a mermaid at the National Aquarium groundbreaking in 1978. I indicated that the gig came Blair's way because the model hired to play the mermaid showed up with such heavy make-up and done-up hair that she might have made a better siren for The Block than lure for a family-friendly attraction.
NEWS
January 19, 2011
For three decades, Ridgely Middle School's PTA has held an annual craft fair to raise money for the school. The $13,000 in proceeds from last fall's event will be used for such things as school supplies, student assemblies and phone directories distributed in September. Every penny raised by the PTA, organizers say proudly, goes back into the school. But this may be the last school year Baltimore County allows the event. The reason? The PTA leases space in the Timonium school to third-party, for-profit vendors (generally part-time purveyors of jewelry, silk floral arrangements, hand-knit sweaters and the like)
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 1, 1996
Judging by what's on view in the Maryland Institute's exhibit "Spaces and Forms Part I," more ought to be on view. What we have doesn't add up to an especially exciting exhibit.A sculpture show that comes in two parts, with "Part II" due early next year, "Spaces and Forms" is loosely tied to the 1996 centennial of the institute's Rinehart School of Sculpture. Most of the artists were recommended by Rinehart director Norman Carlberg.Maybe one or two of the seven artists scheduled for "Part II" should have joined the four in "Part I," for the galleries have a somewhat under-populated look.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer On Gardening | January 21, 2010
T he number of home gardeners jumped by almost 40 percent last season, but nearly half of them won't be back this year. Most probably found vegetable gardening too much work. Or, because it was a pretty poor gardening season, they didn't have much success. So, in a series of columns, I'm trying to get rookie vegetable gardeners off to a solid start. Last week, we talked about siting the garden, and my advice was to consider constructing a raised bed and filling it with bags of compost.
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