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By ROB KASPER | January 10, 2007
Now that it is cold, or supposed to be, I have been eating parsnips. Parsnips fall in the category of "winter vegetables" because their flavor fully develops when the roots have been exposed to near-freezing temperatures. The blast of cold weather turns the parsnip's starch into sugar - a reaction to winter weather that is exactly the opposite of mine. Parsnips look like albino carrots but they taste sweeter than their orange-skinned cousins. While this was news to me, parsnip eaters have known it for centuries.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 10, 2007
Now that it is cold, or supposed to be, I have been eating parsnips. Parsnips fall in the category of "winter vegetables" because their flavor fully develops when the roots have been exposed to near-freezing temperatures. The blast of cold weather turns the parsnip's starch into sugar - a reaction to winter weather that is exactly the opposite of mine. Parsnips look like albino carrots but they taste sweeter than their orange-skinned cousins. While this was news to me, parsnip eaters have known it for centuries.
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NEWS
By Betty Hallock and Betty Hallock,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
Parsnip and celery root are layered with nutmeg-laced cream and two kinds of cheese for this luscious gratin created by Ari Rosenson, chef de cuisine of Cut in Los Angeles. This recipe calls for a 9-inch gratin dish or deep-dish pie plate. Betty Hallock writes for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis. CELERY ROOT AND PARSNIP GRATIN Serves 8 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon milk 2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper 1 pinch nutmeg 2 large celery roots (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
NEWS
By Betty Hallock and Betty Hallock,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
Parsnip and celery root are layered with nutmeg-laced cream and two kinds of cheese for this luscious gratin created by Ari Rosenson, chef de cuisine of Cut in Los Angeles. This recipe calls for a 9-inch gratin dish or deep-dish pie plate. Betty Hallock writes for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis. CELERY ROOT AND PARSNIP GRATIN Serves 8 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon milk 2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper 1 pinch nutmeg 2 large celery roots (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 30, 1994
An old French technique for poaching fish in the oven results in a light and delicate texture in just a little splash of moisture. The fish is not only lean and healthy but also absolutely delicious.Here's how it works: You place the fish on a bed of vegetables in a skillet, splash with fish stock and white wine, then cover with parchment. Heat the skillet until the liquids begin to boil, then transfer to the oven to finish cooking.Serve with pan juices finished into a sauce.Why it tastes so good: Cooking fish in liquid preserves that moist, delicate and slightly resilient texture.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
A Parsnip-Pecan Bread recipe was the request of Dolores Greenberg of Kelso, Wash. The recipe, she wrote, "was given out on the 'Victory Garden,' PBS Channel 10, but I couldn't get it. It sounds something like zucchini bread, but I think it had less sugar because parsnips are sweeter."Similar responses - some identifying the recipe as bread, others as cake - arrived from Debbie Holter of Fallston, Bettie Nyquist of Sioux Falls, S.D., Rose J. Katen of Falls Church, Va., Elizabeth Sykes of Towson and Anne Tallarico of Laurel.
FEATURES
By Elaine Strong and Elaine Strong,Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph | February 17, 1993
Joining black beans, pasta and other folk foods, root vegetables have made their way into the kitchens of gourmet cooks.In those kitchens, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, celery root and beets are being sauteed, scalloped and honey-baked, drizzled with lemon-dill butter, bathed in wine sauces and sprinkled with toasted pine nuts.Gourmet cooks have accepted these earthy vegetables with very good reason. They're packed with nutrition, low in fat, high in fiber and robust in flavor.Carrots are probably the most popular and versatile root vegetable.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Stein-Novack and Phyllis Stein-Novack,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 22, 1995
Cookbook author Barbara Kafka has a strong sense of taste, a dry wit and a passion for unpretentious food.She wants Americans to cook. She wants us to loosen up in the kitchen, constantly taste things, invite friends in for a simple meal and relax over a glass of wine.She hopes we'll whisk our shopping carts past the vast array of frozen foods and reach for a fresh plump chicken. To her, "The biggest social tragedy in America today is that families don't eat dinner together."Always quick to voice an opinion, Ms. Kafka is one of today's most knowledgeable food and wine writers.
FEATURES
By Irene Sax and Irene Sax,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 1996
I'm sick of stodge. I'm tired of stew, and of mashed potatoes, and of what food writers like to call "elemental" soups. I'm ready to eat something fresh.But even though temperatures are rising and spring seems a possibility, fresh food -- really fresh, not flown from another hemisphere -- is months away. And so I turn to parsley, an old friend that tastes like everything that's fresh and green in the world.Once, parsley was the only fresh herb I could find in winter, and it was always curly parsley.
NEWS
By ELAINE MARKOUTSAS and ELAINE MARKOUTSAS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 4, 2006
There are no wallflowers among the hippest cover-ups today. Walls are taking on patterns that are big, bold, color-crazy and modern, although sometimes rooted in traditional design. Some trend-spotters say this signals a return to more lavish, over-the-top and possibly even cluttered interiors. It may be a reaction to of-the-moment minimalism that seems to pervade design magazines and retail catalogs. What's different about this renewed craving to put up paper, something we haven't seen a rush to do since the 1980s, is that even some diehard modernists dig it. The pattern may be startling.
NEWS
By ELAINE MARKOUTSAS and ELAINE MARKOUTSAS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 4, 2006
There are no wallflowers among the hippest cover-ups today. Walls are taking on patterns that are big, bold, color-crazy and modern, although sometimes rooted in traditional design. Some trend-spotters say this signals a return to more lavish, over-the-top and possibly even cluttered interiors. It may be a reaction to of-the-moment minimalism that seems to pervade design magazines and retail catalogs. What's different about this renewed craving to put up paper, something we haven't seen a rush to do since the 1980s, is that even some diehard modernists dig it. The pattern may be startling.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
A Parsnip-Pecan Bread recipe was the request of Dolores Greenberg of Kelso, Wash. The recipe, she wrote, "was given out on the 'Victory Garden,' PBS Channel 10, but I couldn't get it. It sounds something like zucchini bread, but I think it had less sugar because parsnips are sweeter."Similar responses - some identifying the recipe as bread, others as cake - arrived from Debbie Holter of Fallston, Bettie Nyquist of Sioux Falls, S.D., Rose J. Katen of Falls Church, Va., Elizabeth Sykes of Towson and Anne Tallarico of Laurel.
FEATURES
By Irene Sax and Irene Sax,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 1996
I'm sick of stodge. I'm tired of stew, and of mashed potatoes, and of what food writers like to call "elemental" soups. I'm ready to eat something fresh.But even though temperatures are rising and spring seems a possibility, fresh food -- really fresh, not flown from another hemisphere -- is months away. And so I turn to parsley, an old friend that tastes like everything that's fresh and green in the world.Once, parsley was the only fresh herb I could find in winter, and it was always curly parsley.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Stein-Novack and Phyllis Stein-Novack,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 22, 1995
Cookbook author Barbara Kafka has a strong sense of taste, a dry wit and a passion for unpretentious food.She wants Americans to cook. She wants us to loosen up in the kitchen, constantly taste things, invite friends in for a simple meal and relax over a glass of wine.She hopes we'll whisk our shopping carts past the vast array of frozen foods and reach for a fresh plump chicken. To her, "The biggest social tragedy in America today is that families don't eat dinner together."Always quick to voice an opinion, Ms. Kafka is one of today's most knowledgeable food and wine writers.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 30, 1994
An old French technique for poaching fish in the oven results in a light and delicate texture in just a little splash of moisture. The fish is not only lean and healthy but also absolutely delicious.Here's how it works: You place the fish on a bed of vegetables in a skillet, splash with fish stock and white wine, then cover with parchment. Heat the skillet until the liquids begin to boil, then transfer to the oven to finish cooking.Serve with pan juices finished into a sauce.Why it tastes so good: Cooking fish in liquid preserves that moist, delicate and slightly resilient texture.
FEATURES
By Elaine Strong and Elaine Strong,Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph | February 17, 1993
Joining black beans, pasta and other folk foods, root vegetables have made their way into the kitchens of gourmet cooks.In those kitchens, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, celery root and beets are being sauteed, scalloped and honey-baked, drizzled with lemon-dill butter, bathed in wine sauces and sprinkled with toasted pine nuts.Gourmet cooks have accepted these earthy vegetables with very good reason. They're packed with nutrition, low in fat, high in fiber and robust in flavor.Carrots are probably the most popular and versatile root vegetable.
FEATURES
January 16, 1991
Family dinner are back in style, especially on the weekend when there's more time to linger in the kitchen. A family dinner calls for something special -- not necessarily fancy, just good.Braised veal brisket with dried fruit fits the bill. Brisket requires the slow moist heat cooking of braising to ensure that it's fork tender. Braising in the oven means that its' practically fuss free, so there's plenty of time for the cook to spend with family and friends.A veal brisket typically weighs between two and 2 1/2 pounds enough to serve six. Parsnips and carrots, dried apricots and prunes cook alongside the brisket during the last half hour, providing a delicious and colorful accompaniment for the veal.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | December 24, 2006
Irish Charities of Maryland, which also sponsors the Baltimore Irish Festival at Timonium Fairgrounds, recently held a "What's in Your Guinness?" recipe contest to find the tastiest ways to use the Irish beer Guinness in food. Six restaurants entered; this hearty dish from Jeffrey Smith, chef/owner and operator of the Chameleon Cafe in Lauraville, won top honors. BRAISED SHORT RIBS WITH VEAL STOCK GUINNESS REDUCTION Serves 6 to 7 1/2 cup flour salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 2 pounds beef short ribs 1/4 cup vegetable oil 1/2 pound onions, chopped 8 ounces carrots, chopped 3 cups veal stock 4 garlic cloves 1 bay leaf 4 peppercorns 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 can Guinness beer 1/4 cup each, diced: turnips, carrots, rutabaga, parsnips Season flour with salt and pepper.
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