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NEWS
May 31, 2009
Katherine Elizabeth Parsley of Winston Salem, NC, and Jeffrey Clifford Johnson of Annapolis were married at 6:00 pm on May 16, 2009 at St. James Episcopal Church in Wilmington, North Carolina. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Ronald G. Abrams. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Archer Parsley of Winston Salem. Her maternal grandparents were the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert Edward Carswell. Her paternal grandparents were Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Grant Parsley. The bride graduated from Foxcroft School in Middleburg, VA, and Davidson College in North Carolina.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
A pedestrian was fatally hit by a motorist who fled the scene Saturday in Dundalk, Baltimore County police said. Ronny Parsley, 43, of no fixed address, was killed in the collision at North Point and Charlesmont roads, police say. Police responded to the scene just after midnight, and Parsley was taken to Bayview Medical Center, where he was later pronounced dead. Investigators are searching for a white truck with damage to the front, but do not know the vehicle's make or model.
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NEWS
November 25, 2003
On November 24, 2003; HOWARD A. PARSLEY, JR.; loving son of Hazel and the late Howard Parsley, Sr.; beloved brother of Wayne Parsley and Susan Parsley; dear uncle of Steven and his wife Kelly Parsley. Relatives and friends may call at the family owned Ambrose Funeral Home of Landsdowne, 2719 Hammonds Ferry Road on Wednesday from 2 to 4 PM, where a Funeral Service will be held at 5:30 PM. Interment will be private. Memorial donations may be made in his name to the American Diabetes Association, 407 Central Avenue, Reisterstown, MD 21136.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
This recipe has the savory flavors of bratwurst, onions, garlic and parsley, and is mixed with cheese and then wrapped stromboli-style in a pizza dough. All of the preparation for this recipe is performed at home, making it a great light tailgate offering that can be ready to eat in under 10 minutes at the parking lot. Bratwurst roll 1 pack of bratwurst sausage (5 or 6 links) 14 ounce pre-made pizza dough (from the pop-can) 1/2 of a large sweet onion (diced) 5 cloves of garlic (peeled and diced)
NEWS
March 30, 2006
On March 29, 2006, BILLIE L. PARSLEY (nee Stewart), beloved mother of Sandra C. Mc Cormick, Lana S. Kyger, Sharon K. Senft and their husbands; dear sister of Ray Stewart. Also survived by five grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY, INC., 10 W. Padonia Road (at York Road), Timonium-Cockeysville, on Thursday, 7 to 9 P.M. A Graveside Service will be held in Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens on Friday, March 31, at 11 A.M.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 17, 2009
The grounds and gardens around the Edenwald Retirement Community in Towson are perfectly manicured, but not by the residents. Though many of them gardened at their own homes, gardening is something they left behind when they went to live at Edenwald. That is, until Amalie Adler Ascher, who has been a resident for seven years, suggested a Parsley Club. She proposed it last summer in a "Flower Talk" column she writes for the newsletter, and now it is one of the most successful clubs at the 400-resident community.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | September 30, 2007
To make me feel better, can we all please agree that chopped fresh basil could easily be mistaken for chopped fresh parsley? Why, you might even say the two green herbs are indistinguishable. Except that parsley tastes like lawn clippings, whereas basil tastes more like leafy yard waste. Granted, the contestants on Top Chef probably could tell the difference with a simple glance, but these people have spent years differentiating between "I Can't Believe it's Not Butter" and "clarified butter."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
Warren E. Parsley Sr., the College of Notre Dame's buildings and grounds supervisor who had earlier renovated homes in Baltimore's older neighborhoods, died of cancer Saturday at his residence in the Lauraville section of Northeast Baltimore. He was 56. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pen Lucy, Mr. Parsley learned carpentry from his grandfather and father, who built numerous homes in the Baltimore suburbs. A sketch of his life that he wrote said he began working weekends and summers alongside family members when he was 11. A 1967 City College graduate, Mr. Parsley attended Chicago Technical College in Chicago and served in an Army Corps of Engineers combat unit from 1968 to 1971 as a construction supervisor in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 20, 2005
Ambrosia Parsley is just waking up, so that lilting, little-girl voice of hers sounds a bit worn. It's 8:30 in the morning in San Fernando Valley, Calif., where she's calling from her brother's home. The 33-year-old New York resident is on the West Coast gearing up to promote the latest album by her group, Shivaree. Who's Got Trouble? is a sophisticated, darkly witty collection of twangy saloon ballads. The CD is the trio's third full-length release and another dazzling showcase for Parsley, the group's focal point and chief songwriter.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 8, 1997
DALLAS -- Mesa Inc. agreed yesterday to buy Parker & Parsley Petroleum Co. for $1.9 billion in stock and assumed debt, adding oil reserves to its natural gas holdings in a bid to recapture its lost prominence in the U.S. energy industry.The $40.25-a-share agreement, 38 percent more than Parker & Parsley's closing price Friday, will form one of the largest U.S. exploration and production companies. Mesa will assume about $500 million of Parker & Parsley debt.Mesa's planned purchase of a company whose market value is four times its own recalls former Chairman T. Boone Pickens' practice in the 1980s of using Mesa to pursue hostile takeover bids for larger rivals.
NEWS
May 31, 2009
Katherine Elizabeth Parsley of Winston Salem, NC, and Jeffrey Clifford Johnson of Annapolis were married at 6:00 pm on May 16, 2009 at St. James Episcopal Church in Wilmington, North Carolina. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Ronald G. Abrams. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Archer Parsley of Winston Salem. Her maternal grandparents were the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert Edward Carswell. Her paternal grandparents were Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Grant Parsley. The bride graduated from Foxcroft School in Middleburg, VA, and Davidson College in North Carolina.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 17, 2009
The grounds and gardens around the Edenwald Retirement Community in Towson are perfectly manicured, but not by the residents. Though many of them gardened at their own homes, gardening is something they left behind when they went to live at Edenwald. That is, until Amalie Adler Ascher, who has been a resident for seven years, suggested a Parsley Club. She proposed it last summer in a "Flower Talk" column she writes for the newsletter, and now it is one of the most successful clubs at the 400-resident community.
NEWS
By Renee Enna | April 23, 2008
This vegetarian Italian "casserole" is mostly a stove-top preparation. Instead of making our own marinara, we're using a good-quality jarred version. (But nothing's stopping you from using your own!) Cooking the ingredients on the stove top, then popping a pan into the oven just long enough to melt the cheese and warm all the ingredients together, gives this entree the feel of a long-cooking casserole, minus the long cooking. If you want meat, add chopped pepperoni to taste when you heat the sauce and mushrooms, or just use a meat-based pasta sauce.
NEWS
By Bill Daley | March 26, 2008
The briny tang of pimento-stuffed green olives in this pasta dish pairs well with shellfish, especially the rich, sweet flavor of shrimp. The garlic, sauteed until golden, offers its own caramelized depth along with incredible aroma. This recipe offers plenty of eye appeal, with the pink shrimp and red-flecked green of the olives standing out on a bed of spaghetti. For a different zing, try green olives stuffed with chile or anchovy. Pass some finely grated parmesan at the table for sprinkling on the pasta.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2008
Julia Rockwell of Pittsfield, Mass., was looking for a recipe for a chicken soup that could be made in a slow cooker. Kathy Krieger of Baltimore sent in a recipe for chicken soup that she has adapted over the years to make in her slow cooker. You'll need to allow two days to make this soup because her recipe involves a two-stage cooking process. The first stage takes eight hours; then the soup needs to cool completely so that the fat can be removed. Then the broth is returned to the slow cooker, and fresh vegetables are added in the second stage.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | September 30, 2007
To make me feel better, can we all please agree that chopped fresh basil could easily be mistaken for chopped fresh parsley? Why, you might even say the two green herbs are indistinguishable. Except that parsley tastes like lawn clippings, whereas basil tastes more like leafy yard waste. Granted, the contestants on Top Chef probably could tell the difference with a simple glance, but these people have spent years differentiating between "I Can't Believe it's Not Butter" and "clarified butter."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 22, 1992
"What you're looking for in a pilaf is for the grains to be very separate when they're cooked," says Mary Jo Hogue, test-kitchen manager for the U.S.A. Rice Council, a trade group.Any kind of rice will do, she says, but the best results often come with long-grain rice, which is four to five times as long as it is wide and tends to hold up better for long cooking times. (An exception is the Turkish recipe below, which calls for short-grain rice.)Pilafs are often one-dish meals, containing rice, vegetables and meat or fish, but they can also be meatless, for vegetarians or those abstaining from meat for religious reasons.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
Sara R. Knowles of St. Augustine, Fla., requested a recipe for cabbage soup "like the one we enjoyed at Big Boy restaurants in Ironwood, Mich." She added, "I love soup, and nothing I've found can come close to this soup. I'd appreciate help in getting that one or something close to it." Margaret S. Waring of Baltimore responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Cabbage Soup Makes 3 quarts, serves 8 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 2 celery stalks, chopped one 16-ounce can kidney beans, undrained 1/2 large head of cabbage, chopped one 28-ounce can chopped tomatoes, undrained 28 ounces water (use tomato can for measuring)
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Reporter | May 30, 2007
1 // A SIMPLE HERB GARDEN Start with three or four of the basics, such as basil, oregano or thyme. There are more than a dozen easy-to-grow herbs that reflect what's in the spice rack, so consider what kinds of cuisine you like before choosing the three or four varieties you might want to plant. Italian? Grow basil, chives and parsley to start. And add oregano, rosemary, marjoram, sage or thyme. Mexican? Start with basil and oregano, and certainly include cilantro. Seafood? Dill and French tarragon are a good place to begin.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | March 21, 2007
Fresh salmon is so rich it needs very little to highlight its warm flavor. For me, freshly minced ginger, a handful of chopped green onions or parsley and a drizzle of soy sauce are enough. I leave the skin on the fish when roasting; it helps hold the fillet together while cooking and it enhances the flavor to a degree. (The skin may stick to the hot baking pan. Don't worry; carefully lift the cooked fillet off the skin and onto a plate.) Serve this salmon with a simple green salad, white rice and steamed cauliflower florets sauteed briefly in curry-seasoned hot butter.
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