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Parren Mitchell

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By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
They came in droves to pay tribute yesterday to a man they lauded as a civil rights pioneer, mentor and uncompromising activist for social justice. And together, the political dignitaries, civic leaders and family members made one promise: The legacy of Parren J. Mitchell will live on. Mitchell, who died May 28 of complications from pneumonia, was remembered during a four-hour memorial service at West Baltimore's cavernous St. James Episcopal Church for...
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 5, 2009
The home once owned by pioneering Rep. Parren J. Mitchell goes to auction this week amid hopes the mansion's Victorian charm can somehow outweigh a neighborhood coping with vacant houses and a litany of urban ills. With its soaring gilt mirrors and filigreed plaster ceiling medallions, the house at 828 N. Carrollton Ave. is one of the grandest addresses overlooking Lafayette Square. "I bought the house with my heart," confessed Lily T. Tsui, a Potomac resident who purchased the house "on impulse" but never lived in it. "I just looked at it and fell in love with it. When you go inside, it takes your breath away.
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NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
Parren J. Mitchell, the former congressman and civil rights leader, filed a $251 million lawsuit against The Sun and two of its reporters yesterday, alleging trespassing and invasion of privacy when the reporters interviewed him at the Keswick Multi-Care Center in North Baltimore. Standing outside the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, named for Parren Mitchell's older brother, the storied civil rights leader and family patriarch, three relatives excoriated the newspaper, calling a recent series of articles politically motivated and untrue.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,david.nitkin@baltsun.com | August 29, 2008
DENVER - A rare undercurrent of emotion crept into the voice of Baltimore's Michael Cryor - the only black state party chairman in the nation - as he spoke to Maryland convention delegates the morning after the nomination of the nation's first major-party African-American presidential candidate. "We have to make inclusiveness real," Cryor said in hushed tones during the final meeting of the Maryland convention delegation yesterday. "It can't be a matter of convenience." Cryor, 62, has built a career by staying cool under stress and providing sound advice in confidence.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 30, 2007
My introduction to Parren J. Mitchell came courtesy of a billboard and an old rhythm and blues song. It was September of 1968. I had just entered my senior year at Baltimore City College. Mitchell, the eight-term former congressman who died Monday, was making his first run for the House of Representatives against incumbent Rep. Samuel N. Friedel. Mitchell's campaign slogan, prominent on those billboards, urged his supporters to go out on Election Day and "Do What You Gotta Do," which was the title of a popular rhythm and blues song at the time.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2002
Frail and slowed by strokes, former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell has spent the past three years at the Keswick Multi-Care Center in Roland Park, leaving his financial affairs in the hands of his nephew, Michael B. Mitchell Sr. Parren Mitchell's assets include a $60,000-a-year congressional pension and a trust that holds title to his West Baltimore home. But Parren Mitchell's bills - including more than $100,000 owed to Keswick - have gone unpaid by Michael Mitchell, a former city councilman and former state senator who was disbarred for stealing from a client.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2002
A lawsuit against former congressman Parren J. Mitchell has apparently been settled, with the ailing civil rights leader agreeing to pay $6,500 owed for a loan on a car he never got to drive. Papers filed this week in District Court in Baltimore indicate that Mitchell, 80, who has resided in a nursing home for several years, agreed to pay the money to the General Motors Acceptance Corp. The credit company sued Mitchell earlier this year after he failed to make payments on a 1998 Buick Century purchased in his name by his nephew, Michael B. Mitchell, a former state senator and city councilman.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2002
Baltimore community leaders pledged yesterday to create a fund to help former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell, who has fallen more than $140,000 in debt while his nephew Michael B. Mitchell has handled his finances. "I am absolutely devastated by the news," said NAACP President Kweisi Mfume, who succeeded Mitchell as the congressman representing Maryland's 7th District. "Without laying blame, for a lot of us the question is: What can we do to help? No one that has known or worked with him would want his name besmirched by debt."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2002
A Florida firm is foreclosing on the West Baltimore home of former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell, due to the nonpayment of city fees, penalties and interest totaling nearly $3,500. Mitchell's property at 828 N. Carrollton Ave. was one of 10 city properties listed in a foreclosure lawsuit filed late last month in Baltimore Circuit Court. The Florida firm, Quail Roost Properties Inc., which purchased the rights to the properties in September, filed the lawsuit. The city originally sold the rights to the property in a tax sale last year to an affiliate of Quail Roost for $1,795.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | May 29, 2007
Parren J. Mitchell, the first African-American elected to Congress from Maryland and a lifelong crusader for social justice for the nation's minorities, died yesterday of complications from pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 85 and had lived in a nursing home since a series of strokes several years ago. A founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus and later its chairman, Mr. Mitchell was the younger brother of Clarence M. Mitchell Jr., Washington lobbyist for the NAACP in the hard-won civil rights struggles in Congress of the 1960s and 1970s.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
They came in droves to pay tribute yesterday to a man they lauded as a civil rights pioneer, mentor and uncompromising activist for social justice. And together, the political dignitaries, civic leaders and family members made one promise: The legacy of Parren J. Mitchell will live on. Mitchell, who died May 28 of complications from pneumonia, was remembered during a four-hour memorial service at West Baltimore's cavernous St. James Episcopal Church for...
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,sun reporter | June 3, 2007
There were few African-American faces among Louis H. Gilford's construction engineering classmates in the 1960s. Even fewer went on to open their own contracting firms. Lacking a foundation of business contacts, Gilford landed many of his early contracts through the federal and state set-aside programs inspired by former Maryland congressman and civil rights leader Parren J. Mitchell. And that assistance helped build Gilford's Beltsville-based company into one of the region's largest black-owned contracting firms.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and David Nitkin and Eric Siegel and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | May 30, 2007
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who grew up in Little Italy, said, "The Mitchell family was revered in my home." With the death of Parren J. Mitchell, the first African-American elected to Congress from Maryland, Pelosi said, "Baltimore has lost one of its favorite sons." Mitchell, a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus, died Monday at age 85 of complications from pneumonia. The Mitchell family will receive visitors from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday and from 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday at the St. James Parish Center, 1020 W. Lafayette Ave., where photos and memorabilia from Mitchell's life and career will be on display.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 30, 2007
My introduction to Parren J. Mitchell came courtesy of a billboard and an old rhythm and blues song. It was September of 1968. I had just entered my senior year at Baltimore City College. Mitchell, the eight-term former congressman who died Monday, was making his first run for the House of Representatives against incumbent Rep. Samuel N. Friedel. Mitchell's campaign slogan, prominent on those billboards, urged his supporters to go out on Election Day and "Do What You Gotta Do," which was the title of a popular rhythm and blues song at the time.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | May 29, 2007
Parren J. Mitchell, the first African-American elected to Congress from Maryland and a lifelong crusader for social justice for the nation's minorities, died yesterday of complications from pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 85 and had lived in a nursing home since a series of strokes several years ago. A founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus and later its chairman, Mr. Mitchell was the younger brother of Clarence M. Mitchell Jr., Washington lobbyist for the NAACP in the hard-won civil rights struggles in Congress of the 1960s and 1970s.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
A $251 million lawsuit against The Sun and two of its reporters was thrown out yesterday by a Baltimore judge who decided that the reporters acted within the law when they interviewed former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell at a nursing home about the handling of his finances. The lawsuit, filed by Mitchell a few days after the 2002 interview, alleged trespassing, invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress when the reporters visited the former congressman at the Keswick Multi-Care Center in North Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2002
Maryland's attorney general is examining how former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell's finances were managed by his nephew Michael B. Mitchell, who was responsible for his uncle's affairs at a time when the civil rights leader fell more than $140,000 in debt. Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.'s office contacted the office of Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy after reading an article in The Sun Friday about Parren Mitchell's financial straits. Jessamy's office deferred to the attorney general's office after Carolyn Henneman, an assistant attorney general in the criminal division, informed an assistant state's attorney that she intended to review details that led to Parren Mitchell's problems, sources in both offices said yesterday.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
A $251 million lawsuit against The Sun and two of its reporters was thrown out yesterday by a Baltimore judge who decided that the reporters acted within the law when they interviewed former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell at a nursing home about the handling of his finances. The lawsuit, filed by Mitchell a few days after the 2002 interview, alleged trespassing, invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress when the reporters visited the former congressman at the Keswick Multi-Care Center in North Baltimore.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
He comes from one of Baltimore's most storied political families, and as part of that proud dynasty Baltimore City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. watched in frustration as the city's leadership was pushed to the sidelines by a state government ready to assume more control over Baltimore's school system. He set out, he says, to engineer a backup plan to solve the school system's financial troubles. He ended up trumping the state and positioning himself as a central figure in the fiscal drama.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
In the course of his life, former city councilman and state Sen. Michael B. Mitchell, scion of Maryland's politically influential Mitchell family, has alternately seen his name celebrated with distinction and sullied by wrongdoing. Now he is under scrutiny in a federal racketeering case in which he is not a defendant but has been portrayed in testimony as a close adviser to a pair of convicted drug dealers who authorities say used nightclubs to disguise illegal activities. Yesterday, a federal judge described him as "uncharged alleged co-conspirator," and a key witness linked him to an alleged attempt at witness tampering.
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