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By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
Del. Carmen Amedori, a Republican who represents northeast Carroll County, has been tapped to fill a vacancy on the Maryland Parole Commission, according to the county's Republican Central Committee. Michelle Jefferson, chairwoman of Carroll's central committee, said yesterday that "we are hearing that it is supposed to be official as of July 1. Until it comes from the governor's office, it's not 100 percent." Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s office declined to comment on personnel issues.
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NEWS
July 14, 2013
The Sun's article on the 13 people recently released from prison told a very one-sided story ("13 killers go free after court decision," July 11). I hope that, in the future, The Sun will remember that we are all human beings and not one-dimensional characters. First, The Sun left out that the people were locked up after the juries deciding their fates were told that "innocent until proven guilty" was just a guideline. Their constitutional rights were violated, and they lost their freedom.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
Del. Carmen Amedori, a Republican who represents northeast Carroll County, has been tapped to fill a vacancy on the Maryland Parole Commission, according to the county's Republican Central Committee. Michelle Jefferson, chairwoman of Carroll's central committee, said yesterday that "we are hearing that it is supposed to be official as of July 1. Until it comes from the governor's office, it's not 100 percent." Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s office declined to comment on personnel issues.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Longtime Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee is retiring from the position he's held for 25 years to become a member of the state's Parole Commission. His appointment was announced Wednesday by Gov. Martin O'Malley. Weathersbee, 69, a prosecutor for four decades, said he will “retire” June 11, and start on the commission the next day amid “mixed emotions.” “I've got an opportunity to do something else and stay kind of in the field, so I am going to take it,” said Weathersbee, a Democrat.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening won't be sending any state prisoners home early for the holidays this year -- breaking a tradition that dates at least to the 1970s.Gubernatorial spokesman Ray Feldmann said Mr. Glendening received no recommendations for the annual Christmas commutations from the Maryland Parole Commission -- and therefore, couldn't send anybody home early."He asked the question, were there any to come before him, and [the commission] said no," Mr. Feldmann said. "I know it's unusual."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 17, 1996
Davey shifted Cal to third and the Dow sank 161.05 points.The gubner's men goofed in appointing Thomas V. Miller III to the Parole Commission. Should have been the Ethics Commission.N If Susan Molinari can't save the Dole campaign, nobody can.Bertha missed the Olympics. Better luck next time.Pub Date: 7/17/96
NEWS
September 18, 1997
An article in yesterday's editions described Gov. Parris N. Glendening's directive to the Parole Commission not to release murderers or rapists as an executive order. No such formal order was issued, although a judge overturning the governor's new policy described it as having the same effect as an executive order.Pub Date: 9/18/97
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1994
A court hearing this summer could determine whether Terrence G. Johnson, 31, is being held illegally for the killing of a Prince George's County police officer -- a crime he was convicted of 15 years ago.Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Warren B. Duckett Jr. agreed yesterday to hold the hearing Aug. 2 to consider Johnson's petition for release.Yesterday, Johnson's lawyers said the state parole commission violated his constitutional rights to due process by denying his parole request in 1991. They also said Johnson is being cheated out of "good time" credits that would speed his release, that his exemplary prison record is being ignored and that the parole commission's denials are "vindictive and in retaliation" for his acquittal on first-degree murder charges.
BUSINESS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | September 18, 1991
Former First Maryland S&L president Julian S. Seidel, serving a 12-year federal prison term for his convictions on charges tied to the thrift's 1985 collapse, has lost another attempt to have his sentence reduced.Judge Joseph C. Howard denied Seidel's request for a sentence reduction without a court hearing, in a two-page order filed this month in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.Seidel, who was convicted and sentenced here in 1989, already had lost bids for early parole before the federal Parole Commission and the commission's National Appeal Board.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dana Hedgpeth and Dennis O'Brien and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writers | August 3, 1994
Terrence G. Johnson, convicted of killing a Prince George's County police officer in 1979, says state prison officials denied him parole in 1991 because they were overly concerned about the negative publicity that might accompany his release.Lawyers for the state Parole Commission say no one ever promised Johnson that he would be paroled before his mandatory release date, July 6, 1997.Now, a hearing before Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Warren B. Duckett Jr. could end tomorrow with a decision to release Johnson.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
In the article, "Baltimore Country woman murdered despite police safety" (Feb. 8), Marylanders are again reminded of the efficiency of our justice system. The article's title should have been "Awarding good behavior results in another death," since, not implied by the title, the victim did not follow police recommendations for her safety. The alleged murderer was released from prison, despite County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger's office advocating against his parole. But, as the article notes, our state's parole commission let him go because the convicted prisoner had "earned prison credit for good behavior.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 3, 2012
The governor of Maryland, a Democrat who fostered a reputation for being tough on crime to neutralize claims that he's some sort of liberal, says it's full speed ahead for a new juvenile jail in Baltimore — most recent price tag, $70 million. This is the sort of predictable, inside-the-box thinking we get from Martin O'Malley and from politicians of both major parties. If O'Malley had a truly progressive thought — such as proposing a complete change in how the state handles kids who commit serious crimes — that would be news.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malleyis taking steps to grant clemency to two Maryland inmates serving life sentences, including a Baltimore man convicted of murder at age 14 - the first time he has proceeded that far on such an action. Aides said public notices will be posted Wednesday that the two cases are under consideration. Officials say the notices are intended to solicit public feedback, and decisions could be made by the end of the month. During his tenure as governor, O'Malley has denied early release for 57 inmates recommended for release by the state's parole commission.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Nancy Lee Murphy, a veteran Baltimore County Democratic legislator who served in Maryland's House of Delegates and Senate, died Dec. 30 of a heart attack at St. Agnes Hospital the day before her 82nd birthday. "It was certainly sad news to end the year with for the friends who knew Nancy. She was such a great family person," said former Harford County Executive Eileen Rehrmann, who had served with Ms. Murphy in the House of Delegates during the 1980s and remained a close friend. "During all her years in public life, she served her constituents well.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
Peter Hermann's story "Child sex suspect a repeat offender" (May 14) reminds us of several aspects of chronic dysfunction in criminal justice in our state, and especially in our city. Let's start with this suspect's parole. We are told that "he was paroled in March after having served 19 months in prison." Although parole assessment guidelines classify drug-selling as "nonviolent," this man had a 2007 manslaughter conviction. There has to be something wrong with paroling him so soon, or at all, with this kind of prior record.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2008
The nomination of Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.'s son for a District Court judgeship is prompting a vow of resignation from at least one member of the Anne Arundel County Judicial Nominating Commission and raising old questions of nepotism and political interference. Thomas V. Miller III, a 12-year veteran of the Maryland Parole Commission, was passed over by the 13-member nominating commission in February when he applied for one of three vacant positions. But after Gov. Martin O'Malley, a Democrat, issued an executive order in April requiring all such panels to produce at least three nominations per vacancy, the commission voted Wednesday night to recommend Miller and four other previously rejected candidates for a spot on the bench.
NEWS
June 19, 2000
Provident Bank names Vicki Cox a vice president Ellicott City resident Vicki Cox has been named vice president in the marketing division at Provident Bank. Cox will manage all public and community relations and oversee the corporate communications program. She served as public information administrator for former County Executive Charles I. Ecker. Ex-Md. parole official wins Ben Baer Award Columbia resident Jasper Clay, former vice chairman of the U.S. Parole Commission, was awarded the Ben Baer Award at the Association of Paroling Authorities International conference in Ottawa, Ontario.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | September 16, 2006
Man who violated probation was guilty in '89 murder of his mother A convicted murderer who spent years in prison before regaining his freedom through a reduced sentence, only to have his probation revoked, was mistakenly released this week after serving less than three months of a new seven-year term, a state parole commission official said yesterday. Brian J. Dancik, convicted in 1989 of beating his mother to death in her Pikesville home, was set free after serving 76 days of the seven-year prison term imposed in June.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | October 10, 2007
The chairman of the Maryland Parole Commission told lawmakers yesterday that counties across the state have failed to hold parole hearings for eligible inmates and that better communication is necessary among local officials, the parole commission and the Maryland Division of Parole and Probation. During a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee, commission Chairman David R. Blumberg also said counties need to standardize the parole process for inmates of local detention centers. "If we use the same procedure in every jurisdiction, then we won't have people falling through the cracks," he said.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Jennifer Skalka and Greg Garland and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporters | August 25, 2007
When Arthur Bremer walks out of a Maryland prison in a few months after 35 years behind bars, the would-be assassin will leave without having received psychological or mental health treatment that could have helped him adjust to life on the outside, the state's Parole Commission chairman said yesterday. Bremer, who shot Democratic presidential candidate George C. Wallace in Laurel in 1972, has refused to participate in mental health treatment programs while incarcerated, said David R. Blumberg, chairman of the commission, adding that it could be made a condition of Bremer's release that he see a counselor regularly and that he could be returned to prison if he didn't comply.
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