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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
Del. John G. Gary, the Republican candidate for county executive, wants county voters to have the power to remove judges and parole board members who accept plea bargains and release violent criminals.That is a key plank of Mr. Gary's anti-crime platform, which also calls for the hiring of 80 new police officers over four years. Mr. Gary released his plan Wednesday.If elected, Mr. Gary said, he would prod the General Assembly to give voters the recall power. "For once, judges and parole board members will be working for us instead of criminals," he said.
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NEWS
By Walter Lomax | July 22, 2012
Earlier this month, the Supreme Court ruled that mandatory life without parole for juvenile offenders violates the U.S. Constitution's prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment. The court cited the developmental differences between young people and adults and concluded that children and teens are different from adults for the purpose of criminal sentences. Maryland does not technically have mandatory sentencing to life without parole for minors. But for all practical purposes in our state, sentences of life with the possibility of parole have become synonymous with death in prison, contrary to the intent of sentencing judges.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2005
HOUSTON - A lawyer for Frances Newton, who is scheduled to be executed Sept. 14 for the murders of her husband and two children, asked the state parole board yesterday to commute her sentence, saying new information casts doubt on the credibility of the investigation that led to her 1988 conviction. Similar assertions filed earlier this summer with the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals were rejected yesterday, with that panel deciding the new evidence was not compelling enough for the court to intervene.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
This week, Gov.Martin O'Malleyis making a first, tentative use of one of his most fundamental powers as governor: to right injustices in the treatment of those who have been convicted of crimes. Mr. O'Malley is moving toward commuting the sentences of two inmates sentenced to life in prison, a welcome departure from his previous habit of simply ignoring the recommendations of Maryland's parole board in the case of lifers. He was pushed by the legislature, and he is wading gingerly into the issue.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 6, 1992
This is going to be a serious, decorous campaign. Deviations from my high standard are entirely the responsibility of the idiot -- parole board that let my monstrous opponent out.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
Arthur Herman Bremer, who paralyzed former Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace and then spurned his offers of forgiveness, has argued he should be freed from prison because shooting "segregationist dinosaurs" is not as serious as harming mainstream politicians.The comments came in an angry, disjointed letter that Bremer wrote to Maryland parole officials last year and that was obtained yesterday by The Sun. Wallace died Sunday at 79.Bremer has never publicly discussed his case. The three-page letter and a 33-page transcript of Bremer's 1996 parole hearing provide the new clues about his feelings toward the Southern populist who "stood in the schoolhouse door," as he once bragged, in a failed attempt to keep blacks out of the University of Alabama.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 22, 1998
NEW YORK -- The New Jersey State Parole Board denied the parole yesterday of Tony Ayala Jr., the former junior middleweight contender who has served 15 years of a 30-year sentence on a 1981 rape conviction. Unless the decision is overturned on appeal, Ayala, 35, will spend at least another 12 months behind bars and will be released outright around June 1999.The decision followed a meeting between Ayala and two members of the parole board -- Andrew Consovoy, the vice chairman of the board, and Roland Gomez Rivera -- at the Bayside State Prison in Leesburg, N.J. They reached a decision within 15 minutes of the conclusion of the interview.
NEWS
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | February 14, 1991
WEATHERFORD, Texas -- Maxine Cooper spends her days in her one-bedroom duplex crocheting, quilting and trying to keep John Robert Whirty in prison.Mrs. Cooper, 66, hopes to impress the Texas parole board with enough correspondence to keep it from releasing the man convicted of murdering and raping her 15-year-old daughter in March 1967. She said that Whirty was sentenced to life imprisonment and that he should serve the full sentence."He should not be paroled. He was on parole when he killed Rose Marie," Mrs. Cooper said recently.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | December 1, 1994
A man on parole for the 1981 bludgeon murder and robbery of a 79-year-old Hampton widow was convicted by a Baltimore County Circuit Court jury yesterday of beating his wife.Billy C. Rivenbark, 42, is being held without bail and faces the possibility of serving the remaining three years of his 16-year, second-degree murder sentence plus whatever time a judge gives him for yesterday's battery conviction. Sentencing is set for Tuesday.Rivenbark, paroled in June 1993 in the 1981 death of Katherine H. Buress, was on trial for grabbing his wife, Sharon, by the face, shaking her violently and shoving her down on the sofa on Aug. 18.He also had been charged with assault with intent to disable -- a felony that could have meant up to 30 years in prison -- but the jury couldn't reach a verdict yesterday.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 2001
LONDON - Less than nine years after they abducted and murdered a toddler in a crime that was among the more notorious in modern British history, 18-year- olds Robert Thompson and Jon Venables were ordered freed yesterday by Britain's Parole Board. The whereabouts of the teen-agers remained unknown, protected by a court order shielding their identities, and it was unclear whether they had already been released from juvenile detention. The teens, who were 10 when they murdered 2-year-old James Bulger, will be under official supervision for the rest of their lives.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 14, 2010
That's nice, Martin O'Malley wanting to promote offshore wind energy. And that's nice, the governor wanting to give a $3,000 tax credit to businesses that hire the unemployed. In tough economic times, and an election year, Maryland's governor demonstrates both progressive thinking on energy and empathy with people out of work. It would be nice if he threw a little of that Mark Farley Grant's way. Just to recap -- because it has been five months and six days since I first told you about this -- an investigation by the Innocence Project at the University of Maryland School of Law concluded that Mr. Grant, a 41-year-old prisoner serving a life sentence in Hagerstown, did not commit the murder for which he was convicted when he was 15. The students and professors involved in the Innocence Project took on Mr. Grant's case, which goes back to West Baltimore in January 1983 and the fatal shooting of a teenager named Michael Gough.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2005
HOUSTON - A lawyer for Frances Newton, who is scheduled to be executed Sept. 14 for the murders of her husband and two children, asked the state parole board yesterday to commute her sentence, saying new information casts doubt on the credibility of the investigation that led to her 1988 conviction. Similar assertions filed earlier this summer with the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals were rejected yesterday, with that panel deciding the new evidence was not compelling enough for the court to intervene.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
Del. Carmen Amedori, a Republican who represents northeast Carroll County, has been tapped to fill a vacancy on the Maryland Parole Commission, according to the county's Republican Central Committee. Michelle Jefferson, chairwoman of Carroll's central committee, said yesterday that "we are hearing that it is supposed to be official as of July 1. Until it comes from the governor's office, it's not 100 percent." Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s office is keeping mum, declining to comment on personnel issues.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2004
HOUSTON - Bringing an abrupt end to a case that had ignited debate over condemning the mentally ill to die, Texas prison officials executed a killer yesterday who was a diagnosed schizophrenic, who once claimed that a plate of beans had spoken to him and who accused his sisters of being spies. Kelsey Patterson, 50, was killed by lethal injection. Patterson was convicted in the 1992 slaying of a businessman and the man's secretary in his hometown of Palestine. After the shootings, Patterson went home, took off all his clothes except his socks and stood in the middle of the street until the police came.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 2001
LONDON - Less than nine years after they abducted and murdered a toddler in a crime that was among the more notorious in modern British history, 18-year- olds Robert Thompson and Jon Venables were ordered freed yesterday by Britain's Parole Board. The whereabouts of the teen-agers remained unknown, protected by a court order shielding their identities, and it was unclear whether they had already been released from juvenile detention. The teens, who were 10 when they murdered 2-year-old James Bulger, will be under official supervision for the rest of their lives.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
For the second time in four months, convicted killer Larry Michael Bratt asked an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court yesterday to substantially trim his two consecutive life sentences, saying he is a changed man -- a statement disputed by prosecutors. "The answer actually lies in the fact that the system actually worked for me," Bratt, a few weeks shy of his 48th birthday, told a panel of judges. "I've discovered, I can't say for everyone, but for me, my ego was my worst enemy. I would delude myself at times.
NEWS
December 19, 1997
ISRAEL'S PAROLE BOARD put humanity above justice in paroling Alan Goodman on condition he leave the country for eight years. He had served 15 years of a life-plus-40-years sentence. Such convicts in Israel normally do not receive parole before 24 years.Politically, the Oct. 26 decision was harmful to Israel's peace with the Palestinians. It gave the impression that the Netanyahu government takes Palestinian life lightly. It was a snub to Palestinian sensibilities. This may not have been intended, but was achieved.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1997
A North Carroll man serving 18 months in jail for homicide by motor vehicle while intoxicated was denied a reduction of his sentence yesterday in Carroll County Circuit Court.Jeremiah L. Walsh, 20, of Schalk Road No. 2 in Millers was convicted in May of killing a county roads worker who was clearing debris from Tropical Depression Fran in 1996. Walsh was sentenced to five years with all but 18 months suspended and was allowed work-release.The victim was William Brown, 60, of Hampstead, who was called out Sept.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1998
Lawyers challenging Gov. Parris N. Glendening's policy that nearly ends parole for life-term prisoners were grilled yesterday by skeptical Court of Appeals judges, several of whom asked why the court should intervene in executive branch policy.The arguments came in three unrelated cases, all involving murderers serving life sentences who claim they are unfairly denied parole consideration. The governor announced in September 1995 that he would block parole for anyone serving life -- killers and rapists -- unless they were dying or elderly.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
Arthur Herman Bremer, who paralyzed former Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace and then spurned his offers of forgiveness, has argued he should be freed from prison because shooting "segregationist dinosaurs" is not as serious as harming mainstream politicians.The comments came in an angry, disjointed letter that Bremer wrote to Maryland parole officials last year and that was obtained yesterday by The Sun. Wallace died Sunday at 79.Bremer has never publicly discussed his case. The three-page letter and a 33-page transcript of Bremer's 1996 parole hearing provide the new clues about his feelings toward the Southern populist who "stood in the schoolhouse door," as he once bragged, in a failed attempt to keep blacks out of the University of Alabama.
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