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July 13, 2004
Sister Mary Eugenne Raupach, a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame who taught in parochial schools for more than six decades, died of complications from two broken hips Wednesday at her order's Villa Assumpta motherhouse in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 95. Born Marie Raupach and raised in Philadelphia, she worked as a long-distance telephone operator before entering the order in 1927. She began teaching that year - not completing her high school education until 1929, and earning a bachelor's degree in education from Boston College in 1951.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Bruce S. McCurnin, a retired physical education teacher and coach, died Tuesday of complications from kidney and liver disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 66. The son of Charles J. McCurnin, a career Army officer, and Marie "Mickey" McCurnin, a homemaker, Bruce Shelby McCurnin was born in Philadelphia and raised in Wilmington, Del. After graduating in 1966 from John Dickinson High School in Wilmington, where he was a champion wrestler, Mr. McCurnin attended Wesley College in Dover, Del., and earned a bachelor's degree in 1969 from what is now Towson University.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | November 1, 1994
Archbishop William H. Keeler, in one of his first public statements since being named a cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church, yesterday made a strong pitch for additional public aid to Maryland parochial schools.At a news conference held to announce a fourth consecutive year of increased enrollment in Baltimore archdiocesan schools, Archbishop Keeler endorsed vouchers and tax credits to aid parents of parochial school students, but he said a "more practical" approach would be to increase public aid in ways that have already "met standards as established by the Supreme Court."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
Sister Lois Mueller, a Sister of Mercy whose career as a teacher and administrator took her to parochial schools in Baltimore, Washington and Georgia, died Wednesday of pneumonia at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 98. "I have known Sister Lois since the 1960s, when she was my superior at St. Bernardine's on Gorsuch Avenue, and she was always a very great lady," said Sister Faith McKean of the Sisters of Mercy. "She was very gentle - but could be determined - but very gentle.
NEWS
February 8, 2007
Sister Mary Elizabeth Waters, a member of the Sisters of St. Francis and a retired educator who taught in several area parochial schools, died Monday of urosepsis, a bloodstream infection, at Assisi House, her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 79. She was born Mary Elizabeth Demetria Waters in Washington and was raised in Baltimore, where she graduated in 1945 from Catholic High School. In 1947, she entered the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia and professed her vows in 1948.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 6, 2011
Sister Mary Lucy Yingling, a member of the Sisters of Mercy whose career as an educator spanned nearly 50 years, died March 31 of complications from Parkinson's disease at The Villa, an assisted-living facility in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County that her order shares with the Mission Helpers of the Sacred Heart. Sister Mary Lucy was 87. The daughter of a postal worker and a homemaker, she was born Katherine Teresa Yingling, the fifth of nine children, in Washington and raised in Georgetown.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 29, 2000
WASHINGTON - Lacking just one vote to free the government to provide a wide array of aid to parochial schools, the Supreme Court settled yesterday for approving the no-fee loan of taxpayer-financed computers and software to those religious institutions. Expressing its views in a scattered group of long opinions, the justices voted 6-3 to uphold a 19-year-old federal program that is designed to promote "innovative" educational programs, at both private and public schools. The six justices in the majority took differing approaches, but they did agree to uphold the program.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Meredith Schlow and Larry Carson and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writers | February 28, 1992
The Hayden administration has backed down from its decision to charge private and parochial schools $175 a day for public health nurses. Instead, Baltimore County government has agreed to a compromise that would halve the number of nurses in those schools.That means 34 private schools will have to share the services of 11 nurses for the rest of the school year.County Executive Roger B. Hayden still could decide to cut the money for the private school nursing positions in next year's budget.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court cleared the way yesterday for states to grant tax credits as a way of channeling money to parochial schools without a direct public subsidy.Without comment, the court turned aside an Arizona case that has been watched closely for signals of the court's current view of parochial school aid, and perhaps for a hint of what the court might do on school vouchers.In another significant school case, from Tennessee, the court refused to protect public school teachers from having to take a drug test, even when there is no evidence of drug abuse among a school's faculty.
NEWS
February 26, 2000
Yes: It's only fair Basic, secular education support for all Maryland's children should be so fundamental to the public good as to be beyond debate. Public, taxpayer-funded education aid to all children in fully accredited schools of any variety is only good. Good for the children and good for our society. Most states provide some aid to all schoolchildren, and the Supreme Court has ruled that the practice is constitutionally sound. As an administrator for schools in poor neighborhoods as well as those in more fortunate surroundings, I see children whose families struggle and children in designer clothes.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | April 22, 2013
It has been nearly three years since my predecessor, Cardinal Edwin O'Brien, and the Blue Ribbon Committee on Catholic Schools released the Strategic Plan for Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Baltimore. Since that time, enrollment declines have been stemmed in many schools; innovative new programs such as our dual language and Montessori initiatives have kept our schools competitive; and systemic changes to the governance of our schools, renewed focus on school leadership - training of principals and development of local school boards, as well as system-wide accreditation - are ensuring Catholic schools remain an excellent value (average annual K-8 cost is approximately $5,000)
NEWS
November 26, 2012
The Baltimore City Police Department employs more people than any other department of city government, yet most of its officers live outside the city. Many residents like the idea of police officers living in their communities because they view them as a deterrent to crime and because they believe officers would have a better understanding of neighborhood problems if they had homes in the area. But if Baltimore hopes to encourage more officers to live where they work, it must develop more effective strategies for getting and keeping them here.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Ten Maryland schools have been named National Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced Friday. Six elementary schools received the honor: Crofton Meadows in Anne Arundel County, Woodholme in Baltimore County, Ring Factory in Harford County, Rachel Carson in Montgomery County, Whitehall in Prince George's County and Pocomoke in Worcester County. Four parochial schools also received the designation: St. Augustine School in Howard County, Notre Dame Preparatory School in Baltimore County, Father Andrew White S.J. School in St. Mary's County and St. Peter's School in Montgomery County.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Aquille Carr's days at Patterson are over for now, but maybe not forever. Recently named the All-Metro Boys Basketball Player of the Year for the second straight season, the 5-foot-7 junior guard left the East Baltimore school and is now enrolled at St. Patrick High School in Elizabeth, N.J. His first day was Monday. St. Patrick is a national boys basketball powerhouse and is one of the oldest parochial schools in New Jersey, but it is reportedly closing its doors at the end of the school year due to dwindling enrollment and financial struggles.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Sister Marie Immaculate Fay, who taught in Baltimore parochial schools, died of cardiopulmonary collapse March 22 at her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 82. Born Margaret Mary Fay in Dublin, Ireland, she attended public schools in Harrisburg, Pa. She entered the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia in 1951 and professed her first vows in 1953. She earned a bachelor of arts in history at Neumann University in Aston. She began teaching at St. Anthony's School in Gardenville in 1952 and later served at the Shrine of the Little Flower in Belair-Edison, St. Catherine of Siena in East Baltimore and Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Essex.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 7, 2011
Thomas Louis "Pep" Perrella, a schools caterer and former Archbishop Curley soccer coach and player, died of pancreatic cancer Sept. 25 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 59 and lived in Overlea. The Baltimore native grew up on Kentucky Avenue. A childhood baseball coach named him "Pepper" or "Pep" after Pepper Martin, the 1930s St. Louis Cardinals base stealer. Before graduating from Archbishop Curley High School in 1970, he scored a soccer goal to secure the school's first Maryland Scholastic Association championship.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Sister Mary Ruth Gerlach, a Sister of Mercy and an educator who later was supervisor of the Mercy Medical Center Chapel, died Sept. 4 of lung cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 94. The daughter of a real estate broker and a homemaker, Ruth Gerlach was born and raised in West Baltimore. She was a graduate of St. Cecilia's parochial school. After graduating from Notre Dame Preparatory School in 1934, she entered the Sisters of Mercy in 1935 at Mount St. Agnes, taking the religious name of Sister Mary Raymond.
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