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Parmesan Cheese

NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2003
Jean H. Carcaba of St. Augustine, Fla., wrote that she was seeking a recipe for Chicken Giardino, which "I recently had at the Olive Garden restaurant. It was one of their healthy choices on the menu. I enjoyed it so much and didn't feel it was a diet meal." Susan Hitchcock of Sonoma, Calif., wrote: "I am responding to the recipe request for Chicken Giardino from the Olive Garden restaurant. I am a big fan of that dish. Although I do not have their recipe, I do have one that is a close second best.
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NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
Shrimp can be dressed up as a cocktail dangling seductively from the edge of a crystal bowl or made into a quick, casual meal with a coating of batter and a plunge in the deep fryer. Shrimp come in a variety of sizes and colors. The kind of dish you're going to make will determine the kind of shrimp you buy. Shrimp are typically sold by count or number per pound. The higher the count, the smaller the shrimp. Extra-large shrimp, 16 to 20 per pound, are the ones you'd like to feature in a shrimp cocktail.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
Kate Linwood's request for a veal Parmesan recipe struck the right note with our readers. Sally Pitner of Baltimore says she makes this recipe at least once a month. However, she says veal cutlets have become so expensive she often uses boneless, skinless chicken breasts pounded thin. The taste is very similar, she says. Lisa Stewart of Reisterstown sent us this recipe:Veal ParmesanServes four to six.3 veal cutlets, cut in half2 eggs, beaten1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon pepper1 cup dry bread crumbs1/2 cup olive or vegetable oil2 cups spaghetti sauce1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese1/2 pound mozzarella cheese, sliced or shredded3 to 4 cups hot, cooked noodlesDip cutlets in combined eggs, salt and pepper.
FEATURES
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 2, 1999
When you think of a meatless pasta dinner, no doubt you have visions of a jar of tomato sauce or a little olive oil and Parmesan cheese. Here are three more interesting and unusual -- but very simple -- meatless dinners with protein and nutrients galore (and not an ounce of red sauce).Serve this creamy, rich Greek Pasta With Feta with a like-minded salad made from romaine lettuce, fresh snips of dill, tomato and thinly sliced onion. You can buy feta cheese already crumbled in most grocery stores, or, to make crumbling easy, place a chunk of it in the freezer for a couple of minutes before you handle it before crumbling.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 15, 2001
Some dishes are a challenge to prepare, especially for entertaining, but if they are exceptionally good, they merit the effort. Risotto, the celebrated rice preparation from northern Italy, falls into this category. Made by stirring simmering stock into rice (and often onions, too) which has been sauteed in butter, risotto is not a quick dish. The stock must be added slowly, about a half-cup at a time, and stirred until it has been completely absorbed by the grains. This technique usually takes about 20 minutes, and the cook must stand at the stove the entire time, constantly making circles with a spoon in the pot. The resulting rice, however, is rich and creamy, with grains that remain separate and firm.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
A super cake and a supreme cauliflower are tasty additions to lunch or dinner.Toni Radomski of Cockeysville requested a "Kandy Kake." She wrote that her husband threw out her recipe for "a wonderful cake topped with peanut butter and melted Hershey bars on top."Rave reviews about this cake came with responses which included titles such as Kandy or Tandy Kake or Tandy Takes.Tracy Beavan of Eldersburg called her treats Tandy Takes. She said preparation time was 30 minutes and baking time 20 minutes.
FEATURES
By Christine Kloostra and Stephen Henderson and Christine Kloostra and Stephen Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2001
The experiment: a completely unscientific study to determine if canine subjects prefer homemade dog food and biscuits over store-bought dry food. The hypothesis: Dogs will eat anything. The test subjects: Truman, an 8-year-old chocolate Labrador, and Kennedy, a 6-year-old Lab-terrier mix. Canine subjects have never demonstrated discriminating palates, having consumed college diplomas, wicker furniture, books, raw turkey, glass bottles and loaves of bread. The guides: Barker's Grub: Easy, Wholesome Home Cooking for Your Dog by Rudy Edalati (Three Rivers Press, New York $12)
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 10, 2007
Here's a promise the dining-out crowd may love to hear: It'll be the best place to eat in the area. That's what the owner/chef of Canton's newest restaurant is vowing. Ted Stelzenmuller certainly knows East Baltimore restaurants. He's worked for the last few years in the vicinity, first at Red Fish, and then at Salt. If all goes as planned, starting tomorrow you'll be able to see whether he lives up to that promise, when he's set to open the doors of Jack's Bistro. OK. His name is Ted. Yet, his eatery is called Jack's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Hiltrud Tuinstra from Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe she lost years ago for making stuffed zucchini. She recalled that it had frozen spinach and bread crumbs added to the zucchini flesh, but unfortunately she could not remember any other details about the recipe. Joann Langdale , also from Santa Rosa, sent in her favorite recipe for making stuffed zucchini, which sounded fairly similar to what Tuinstra was seeking. Stuffed zucchini is one of those dishes that has as many variations as your garden or farmers market has zucchinis.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 18, 2001
Although I enjoy preparing the feast for our family on Thanksgiving Day, I confess that I look forward even more to the dishes made with the leftovers. These creations are less time-consuming to prepare because some of the ingredients are already cooked. Like many people, I buy a large bird so that there will be plenty of turkey remaining for the days after the holiday. And I make twice as much dressing and cranberry sauce as we need for the same reason. Turkey sandwiches are a staple at our house after the big Thursday.
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