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By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
Kate Linwood's request for a veal Parmesan recipe struck the right note with our readers. Sally Pitner of Baltimore says she makes this recipe at least once a month. However, she says veal cutlets have become so expensive she often uses boneless, skinless chicken breasts pounded thin. The taste is very similar, she says. Lisa Stewart of Reisterstown sent us this recipe:Veal ParmesanServes four to six.3 veal cutlets, cut in half2 eggs, beaten1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon pepper1 cup dry bread crumbs1/2 cup olive or vegetable oil2 cups spaghetti sauce1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese1/2 pound mozzarella cheese, sliced or shredded3 to 4 cups hot, cooked noodlesDip cutlets in combined eggs, salt and pepper.
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NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2005
Lee Tillman from Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe for an Italian vegetable and bread soup called "Ribollita" that she had when she was in Florence, Italy. Anne Brusca of Columbia sent in her recipe for Ribollita that she says is a specialty of Italy's Tuscany region. The word means twice baked and is aptly applied to this dish because it is, in fact, cooked twice. Brusca says, "It is a lot of work to make but well worth the effort." I would agree completely. The only change I made to her recipe was that I decided to prepare the soup one day and then bake it with the bread and cheese for the second time the following day. The end result was a marvelously thick and delicious one-pot meal, more like a stew than a soup.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | August 30, 2006
Lisa Turner of Nottingham was looking for a recipe for marinated tomatoes with grated cheese like the ones that were served at the now-closed Palmer House restaurant in Baltimore. They were a family favorite and she was hoping to be able to make these at home. Jo Ann Nuetzel of Parkville sent in a recipe for tomatoes vinaigrette that she says she has been using since the early 1970s.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 15, 2001
Some dishes are a challenge to prepare, especially for entertaining, but if they are exceptionally good, they merit the effort. Risotto, the celebrated rice preparation from northern Italy, falls into this category. Made by stirring simmering stock into rice (and often onions, too) which has been sauteed in butter, risotto is not a quick dish. The stock must be added slowly, about a half-cup at a time, and stirred until it has been completely absorbed by the grains. This technique usually takes about 20 minutes, and the cook must stand at the stove the entire time, constantly making circles with a spoon in the pot. The resulting rice, however, is rich and creamy, with grains that remain separate and firm.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
A super cake and a supreme cauliflower are tasty additions to lunch or dinner.Toni Radomski of Cockeysville requested a "Kandy Kake." She wrote that her husband threw out her recipe for "a wonderful cake topped with peanut butter and melted Hershey bars on top."Rave reviews about this cake came with responses which included titles such as Kandy or Tandy Kake or Tandy Takes.Tracy Beavan of Eldersburg called her treats Tandy Takes. She said preparation time was 30 minutes and baking time 20 minutes.
FEATURES
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 2, 1999
When you think of a meatless pasta dinner, no doubt you have visions of a jar of tomato sauce or a little olive oil and Parmesan cheese. Here are three more interesting and unusual -- but very simple -- meatless dinners with protein and nutrients galore (and not an ounce of red sauce).Serve this creamy, rich Greek Pasta With Feta with a like-minded salad made from romaine lettuce, fresh snips of dill, tomato and thinly sliced onion. You can buy feta cheese already crumbled in most grocery stores, or, to make crumbling easy, place a chunk of it in the freezer for a couple of minutes before you handle it before crumbling.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 14, 2003
MY FAMILY HAS recently recovered from asparagus overload. This is a code-green condition that occurs when you have too many fresh asparagus spears in the fridge and only a few days to cook them before they lose their peak flavor. This particular outbreak was precipitated by an "error of enthusiasm" on my part. I bought way too much asparagus. I had an excuse. It was spring. It was the first farmers' market of the season. I was hungry. Because it was still early in the growing season, about the only homegrown items that the farmers were selling at the Sunday-morning market in downtown Baltimore were stalks of asparagus and a few bunches of rhubarb.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Hiltrud Tuinstra from Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe she lost years ago for making stuffed zucchini. She recalled that it had frozen spinach and bread crumbs added to the zucchini flesh, but unfortunately she could not remember any other details about the recipe. Joann Langdale , also from Santa Rosa, sent in her favorite recipe for making stuffed zucchini, which sounded fairly similar to what Tuinstra was seeking. Stuffed zucchini is one of those dishes that has as many variations as your garden or farmers market has zucchinis.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 14, 2003
More than a decade ago, I wrote an appetizer cookbook called First Impressions. The title reflects the way I feel about the little nibbles that begin a menu or stand alone when offered with drinks. Starters, I believe, are often afterthoughts, relegated to marginal importance, but, in fact, they deserve more attention since they are the first food (sometimes the only fare when served at a cocktail party) our guests sample. For me, perfect hors d'oeuvres should have three basic characteristics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 2005
In its short time here in Maryland, Wegmans has established itself as far more than a supermarket. It is the object of hero worship. The focal point of a cult. Weg-mania has swept the region. Since the 69th Wegmans store - and the first in Maryland - opened Oct. 2, tens of thousands of visitors have flocked to the Hunt Valley shrine, I mean store, to buy fresh-made breads, marvel at its cheese selection and gape at the sheer variety of olives. Four weeks later, finding a parking space was still a challenge.
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