Advertisement
HomeCollectionsParliament Building
IN THE NEWS

Parliament Building

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | September 29, 1993
MOSCOW -- A day of intense and pervasive police pressure around the Russian parliament building led last night to clashes with demonstrators and the promise of more to come.Thousands of gray-uniformed police, many of them young draftees, totally sealed off the parliament, known as the White House, cutting off access and food supplies. They strung coils of razor wire across nearby streets and blocked intersections with dozens of water tankers.Just as the Americans did in Panama when they were after Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, the Russian police yesterday broadcast loud pop music toward the parliament building.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
January 24, 2010
My husband and I live in Bel Air. In April, we stayed four nights in Budapest during an Eastern European vacation. The city and its people were captivating and it was a great experience for us to see its post-Communist beauty. This is a photo of the Parliament Building on the banks of the Danube River. Completed in 1896, this is Hungary's largest building, and as a Parliament building, is second in size only to Great Britain's Parliament in London. Elegant riverboats like the one in the foreground cruise up and down the Danube regularly with stops along its banks, including Budapest.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Tina Susman and Chris Kraul and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | April 13, 2007
Baghdad -- An apparent suicide bombing of the tightly guarded parliament building that killed two Sunni Arab legislators and six other people here yesterday struck at the heart of Iraq's struggling democracy and the U.S. security plan that is intended to bolster it. The attack in the parliament's cafeteria, which wounded 23 people, highlighted what many have described as serious gaps in security around the building where legislators elected in December 2005...
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Tina Susman and Chris Kraul and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | April 13, 2007
Baghdad -- An apparent suicide bombing of the tightly guarded parliament building that killed two Sunni Arab legislators and six other people here yesterday struck at the heart of Iraq's struggling democracy and the U.S. security plan that is intended to bolster it. The attack in the parliament's cafeteria, which wounded 23 people, highlighted what many have described as serious gaps in security around the building where legislators elected in December 2005...
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 2004
EDINBURGH, Scotland - For a parliament that only recently came back to life nearly 300 years after being shut down, Scotland's has made up for some lost time in a big way. One of its first acts, after it got up and limping along five years ago, was to take control of the construction of a new parliament building, which was supposed to take two years to build and cost about $73 million - a figure that left many Scots aghast. Had they only known. Five years and $782 million later - three years past its hoped-for opening and more than 10 times its estimated cost - workers are putting the final touches on the Scottish Parliament building at Holyrood, in anticipation of the official opening by Queen Elizabeth II on Saturday.
TRAVEL
January 24, 2010
My husband and I live in Bel Air. In April, we stayed four nights in Budapest during an Eastern European vacation. The city and its people were captivating and it was a great experience for us to see its post-Communist beauty. This is a photo of the Parliament Building on the banks of the Danube River. Completed in 1896, this is Hungary's largest building, and as a Parliament building, is second in size only to Great Britain's Parliament in London. Elegant riverboats like the one in the foreground cruise up and down the Danube regularly with stops along its banks, including Budapest.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Staff Writer | September 30, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- Russia's foreign minister told President Clinton yesterday that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin would resort to violence only if provoked and had no intention of storming the parliament building."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | October 6, 1993
MOSCOW -- Alexandra Voronovich has lived all of her 70-odd years in Moscow. She has seen Joseph Stalin, Nikita Khrushchev, Leonid Brezhnev and Mikhail Gorbachev all come and go.And though Boris Yeltsin has clearly emerged from the past two days of violent insurrection as the nation's leader, she fears she may see his demise as well.The old woman stood just outside Russia's charred parliament building yesterday, site of fierce gun battles and world attention Sunday and Monday, and shook her head.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | August 22, 1991
The graphic description of the death of a teen-age boy at the barricades in Moscow leaked out of the Soviet Union by electronic computer mail.The account was in a letter from a man named "Aleksei" who was among the Muscovites who rallied to defend the parliament building."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | October 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russia's unrepentant legislators, who earlier this month refused to leave the White House until tanks blasted them out, yesterday took another defiant stand. They refused to leave their government-provided apartments.Some, like Olga A. Chistikh, have little desire to return to a pig farm in the middle of nowhere after having savored the relative comforts of Moscow for the last few years. Others simply have nowhere to go -- like Viktor and Yelena Yakovlev, who relinquished their apartment in a frozen Arctic Circle town after Mr. Yakovlev was elected to parliament three years ago.Friday, the Moscow city government gave the people's deputies who, in defiance of President Boris N. Yeltsin, had stayed in the White House -- Russia's parliament building -- three days to get out of their government apartments.
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 23, 2006
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -- A fierce gunbattle erupted yesterday outside the Palestinian parliament building between rival Palestinian security forces, killing one man, wounding about a dozen people and deepening the sense of anarchy gripping the Gaza Strip. Passers-by scattered in panic as gunmen - some of them belonging to a new Hamas-led police force and others to a unit loyal to the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas - crouched against graffiti-covered walls and behind parked cars, squeezing off rounds from their automatic rifles and firing rocket-propelled grenades in one another's direction.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 2004
EDINBURGH, Scotland - For a parliament that only recently came back to life nearly 300 years after being shut down, Scotland's has made up for some lost time in a big way. One of its first acts, after it got up and limping along five years ago, was to take control of the construction of a new parliament building, which was supposed to take two years to build and cost about $73 million - a figure that left many Scots aghast. Had they only known. Five years and $782 million later - three years past its hoped-for opening and more than 10 times its estimated cost - workers are putting the final touches on the Scottish Parliament building at Holyrood, in anticipation of the official opening by Queen Elizabeth II on Saturday.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2003
MOSCOW - Georgian President Eduard A. Shevardnadze declared a state of emergency in the former Soviet republic yesterday after opposition leaders backed by thousands of protesters seized the Parliament building, forcing the president to flee in mid-speech. With Shevardnadze hunkering down in his residence on the outskirts of the capital city of Tbilisi and vowing to restore order swiftly, opposition leaders retained control of the building and said they would move quickly to form a new government.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | October 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russia's unrepentant legislators, who earlier this month refused to leave the White House until tanks blasted them out, yesterday took another defiant stand. They refused to leave their government-provided apartments.Some, like Olga A. Chistikh, have little desire to return to a pig farm in the middle of nowhere after having savored the relative comforts of Moscow for the last few years. Others simply have nowhere to go -- like Viktor and Yelena Yakovlev, who relinquished their apartment in a frozen Arctic Circle town after Mr. Yakovlev was elected to parliament three years ago.Friday, the Moscow city government gave the people's deputies who, in defiance of President Boris N. Yeltsin, had stayed in the White House -- Russia's parliament building -- three days to get out of their government apartments.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | October 6, 1993
MOSCOW -- Alexandra Voronovich has lived all of her 70-odd years in Moscow. She has seen Joseph Stalin, Nikita Khrushchev, Leonid Brezhnev and Mikhail Gorbachev all come and go.And though Boris Yeltsin has clearly emerged from the past two days of violent insurrection as the nation's leader, she fears she may see his demise as well.The old woman stood just outside Russia's charred parliament building yesterday, site of fierce gun battles and world attention Sunday and Monday, and shook her head.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | October 5, 1993
MOSCOW -- While government troops and rebels stalked each other through a hellishly darkened and rubble-strewn White House yesterday, the bitter truth occurred to Ruslan I. Khasbulatov.Muttering against his arch enemy, Boris N. Yeltsin, the chairman of the parliament exclaimed, "I never thought he would do this. Why isn't anyone coming to help us?"It was one of several moments of strange calm in a day that generally alternated between deadly confusion, anxiety and terror, as the huge parliament building -- known as the White House -- was being pounded by tanks and machine-gun fire.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2003
MOSCOW - Georgian President Eduard A. Shevardnadze declared a state of emergency in the former Soviet republic yesterday after opposition leaders backed by thousands of protesters seized the Parliament building, forcing the president to flee in mid-speech. With Shevardnadze hunkering down in his residence on the outskirts of the capital city of Tbilisi and vowing to restore order swiftly, opposition leaders retained control of the building and said they would move quickly to form a new government.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Staff Writer | September 30, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- Russia's foreign minister told President Clinton yesterday that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin would resort to violence only if provoked and had no intention of storming the parliament building."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | September 29, 1993
MOSCOW -- A day of intense and pervasive police pressure around the Russian parliament building led last night to clashes with demonstrators and the promise of more to come.Thousands of gray-uniformed police, many of them young draftees, totally sealed off the parliament, known as the White House, cutting off access and food supplies. They strung coils of razor wire across nearby streets and blocked intersections with dozens of water tankers.Just as the Americans did in Panama when they were after Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, the Russian police yesterday broadcast loud pop music toward the parliament building.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.