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NEWS
August 17, 2011
We should learn the lessons of the London riots, as the root causes can also be found in Baltimore. The real reason why British youth loots is simply because they are following the example shown to them by the establishment. Young Brits are immersed in a culture where looting has become a way of life which has been highly rewarding to those at the top. The bankers have looted the tax-payers, the members of Parliament have looted their expense allowances, and "celebrity culture" has looted the moral seed bank of the nation.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 6, 2012
So intent was Riccardo Migliori on his mission - observing the U.S. election and asking questions about the voting process in Baltimore - that he missed the statues of saints and the oil painting of Pope Leo XIII. So foreign was the idea that voting might take place in a house of worship that he apparently didn't notice the brass crucifix on the wall above him, either. In fact, it wasn't until he left the polling place in Little Italy and stepped onto chilly Exeter Street on Tuesday morning that Migliori, a senior member of Big Italy's parliament, realized he had just seen Americans voting in the basement of a Roman Catholic church.
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NEWS
By New York Times | November 15, 1990
MOSCOW -- Alarmed by the nation's deepening economic crisis, the Soviet Parliament is demanding an emergency address on the state of the union from President Mikhail Gorbachev.Yesterday's surprising revolt by the normally passive lawmakers, who described the fears of economic collapse and famine they hear from their constituents, succeeded in forcing Gorbachev to agree to address them tomorrow on both the economy and the uncertain shift of government authority across the nation."If we do not do something about the situation now, people will take up arms and pour into the streets, and this will not be a military coup but a popular coup," declared one member of Parliament, Lt. Col. Viktor Alksnis.
NEWS
August 17, 2011
We should learn the lessons of the London riots, as the root causes can also be found in Baltimore. The real reason why British youth loots is simply because they are following the example shown to them by the establishment. Young Brits are immersed in a culture where looting has become a way of life which has been highly rewarding to those at the top. The bankers have looted the tax-payers, the members of Parliament have looted their expense allowances, and "celebrity culture" has looted the moral seed bank of the nation.
NEWS
By P. J. Slavin and P. J. Slavin,Contributing Writer | June 16, 1993
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide is expected to reject an offer from Haiti's Parliament to restore him to the presidency, just as the Parliament hoped he would.In a hollow gesture to block a worldwide petroleum embargo, Haiti's army-backed Parliament voted yesterday to restore recognition to the man the military removed in a bloody 1991 coup.Parliamentarians who supported the vote said they expected Father Aristide to reject the offer -- a rejection, they say, that is part of their strategy to paint him as an unreliable negotiator and thus curtail international support for him.They believe their action will be well received by an international community seeking a way to end this crisis.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 27, 1990
KISHINEV, U.S.S.R. -- The parliament of the Soviet republic Moldova clamped a two-month state of emergency on its southern districts yesterday in an attempt to stop the secession of the Gagauz ethnic minority.The decision came as thousands of Moldovans massed at the edge of the Gagauz region, some armed with metal chains and truncheons, in response to a call from nationalist leaders to "save the republic."The breakaway "Gagauz Republic" was proclaimed in August at a congress of Gagauz elected officials and was immediately declared illegal by the Moldovan parliament.
NEWS
By Chris Hedges and Chris Hedges,New York Times News Service | October 7, 1992
KUWAIT CITY -- Opposition candidates, many of them tied to conservative Islamic groups and all of whom have called for increased democratic rights, won a substantial majority in Kuwait's first parliamentary elections in six years.The opposition walked away with an unexpected 31 of the 50 National Assembly posts, according to vote figures released by the Interior Ministry yesterday.Islamic candidates took 19 seats, more than doubling the nine seats they won in the 1985 parliamentary elections, but infighting between the religious groups makes it doubtful that they will function as a unified bloc.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 17, 1994
ROME -- After two years of tumult that eroded confidence in national leadership, Italy turned toward a new and uncertain political future yesterday as President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro dissolved a scandal-tarred Parliament and a lame-duck government summoned voters to landmark elections.The March 27 vote will mark the end of a closely held political system that has ruled Italy in increasing prosperity and corruption since World War II. Italians say the First Republic, born in the aftermath of war and fascism, is dead.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2005
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The new chairman of Afghanistan's parliament, Yunus Qanooni, said yesterday he would resign as leader of the opposition and support the government of Afghanistan in the interests of the people. His comments, at a news conference in the parliament building, were seen as a peace offering to President Hamid Karzai, whom he has opposed since leaving the government in 2004 to run against him in the presidential race. "I cannot at the same time be chairman of the House of People and opposition of the government," he said as representatives were voting for the two deputy chairmen of the parliament.
NEWS
By Newsday | March 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The United States is reacting with nervous discomfort to an informal request from Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin for Western political support if he were to assume emergency powers in his struggle with hard-liners in the parliament, administration officials confirmed yesterday.Such a move would be considered "extreme," said one U.S. official, who spoke on condition of anonymity.It could not be determined whether President Clinton has responded directly to Mr. Yeltsin. While the Clinton administration favors democratic reform and human rights and wants to discourage Mr. Yeltsin from overturning Russia's precarious constitutional order, it has stopped short of expressing outright public disapproval because it has some sympathy for Mr. Yeltsin over his problems, sources said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 9, 2011
Let's see: Our Wisconsin Supreme Court is choking each other. Our New Jersey lawmakers are threatening to punch each other in the head. But when it comes to crazy fights in government, we're still way behind Afghanistan.  At least the fight in their Parliament was over something important: The impeachment of President Hamid Karzai. Our conflicts have generally been over such noble causes as getting even after personal slights.  Nevertheless, this showdown raised once again that timeless question: Which would you rather get hit by?
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | May 21, 2009
I come to London for the signage ("Danger: Men working overhead"), and to pick up a tube of Euthymol toothpaste and devour a cup of Mr. Whippy lemon ice and a package of chocolate HobNobs, and to enjoy the roomy taxicabs and the cabbies' no-hesitation style of driving, their bold U-turns, and to observe the gilded gates and the Mounted Guards and all the storybook tinges of aristocracy so dear to us Americans. And terrific theater. Saw a beautiful performance by puppets - life-sized horses in War Horse at the National Theatre - shells of horses with visible frames and legs of two puppeteers inside, another manipulating the head, yet the sight of the beasts grazing, nuzzling, shying, rearing up was the most perfect and believable thing I've seen onstage in a long time.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 26, 2009
BAGHDAD -The jet left Baghdad and had just crossed the Euphrates River when it arced back toward the Iraqi capital yesterday. Upon landing at Baghdad's airport, a security guard boarded the plane and left with parliament member Mohammed al-Dayni. But al-Dayni's whereabouts are a mystery as the clamor over his alleged crimes, from murder to gold robberies, threatens to increase sectarian polarization in parliament. The guard who escorted al-Dayni, a Sunni Arab, off the plane was part of his security detail, as were the officers who drove away with him shortly before a nationwide manhunt began.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Said Rifai and Ned Parker and Said Rifai,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2008
BAGHDAD - The Iraqi parliament broke for summer vacation yesterday without passing a law that would have allowed provincial elections to be held this year, dealing a blow to hopes for bringing alienated Sunni and Shiite voices into the political process any time soon. The parliament, which tried during a four-day special session to pass the legislation under pressure from the United States and United Nations, could not resolve differences over Kirkuk, an oil-rich mixed area that the Kurds wish to annex to their semiautonomous northern region.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 2008
TEHRAN, Iran - In a potential major political shift in Iran, a political rival to Iran's president was elected by an overwhelming majority as speaker of the Parliament yesterday. The new speaker, Ali Larijani, Iran's former chief nuclear negotiator, is viewed by the West as a moderating influence in Tehran. The role of parliamentary speaker is a powerful position in Iranian politics, and analysts said Larijani could use it to challenge the president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, against whom Larijani ran for president in 2005.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- A new parliament dominated by foes of President Pervez Musharraf was inaugurated yesterday, ushering in what probably will be a concerted effort by the victorious opposition to curtail the near-total powers the Pakistani leader once held. The buoyant atmosphere, however, was dimmed by signs of potential disarray within the newly ascendant coalition formed by the two main opposition parties after they swept last month's parliamentary elections. The party of assassinated former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, which won the largest share of seats, has yet to put forth a candidate for prime minister.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | March 23, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russia's constitutional court yesterday officially entered the desperate political struggle threatening to destroy the nation.While President Boris N. Yeltsin mourned his mother and his parliamentary enemies talked about setting up their own television station, the court debated who was on the right side of the law.The court decided early today that Mr. Yeltsin had violated the constitution, but deleted a recommendation that this amounted to...
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1990
MOSCOW -- The Soviet parliament lost its nerve yesterday at the brink of a historic decision, delegated to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev the task of choosing a plan for a transition to market economy and granted him sweeping new powers to implement it.In a vote of 323-11, with 56 abstentions, the Supreme Soviet approved Mr. Gorbachev's proposal that he produce by Oct. 15 a single scheme to replace the centralized planned economy built over seven decades of...
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis | February 13, 2008
BAGHDAD -- The bullet-riddled body of an Iraqi newspaper reporter was recovered yesterday in Baghdad, as police in Basra launched an intensive search for a Western journalist working for CBS News and his Iraqi translator. Journalists have been frequent targets in Iraq, which the Paris-based Reporters Without Borders said remains the world's most deadly country for news media workers despite recent security gains. The slain Iraqi journalist was identified as Hisham Muchawat Hamdan, 27, a member of Iraq's Young Journalists' League who reported for three local newspapers.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,Los Angeles Times | January 22, 2008
TEHRAN, Iran -- Iran watchers sought to make sense yesterday of a spat between the conservative speaker of parliament and the country's hard-line president over a budgetary issue that found Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei issuing a rare but opaque opinion. The incident was the latest sign of discord with the Islamic Republic's byzantine ruling system, which combines elements of a democratically elected republic with a theocracy headed by Shiite Muslim clerics, with Khamenei over both. Parliament Speaker Gholam Ali Haddad-Adel read yesterday from the text of the supreme leader's opinion, which the lawmaker said backed his position in a dispute with President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
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