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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
FIRST, LET'S PUT the myth to rest.The Waldorf School does not delay the teaching of reading until the second or third grade.What the North Baltimore private school does do is pay close attention to the physical and intellectual development of children. If some pupils are not quite ready to read by the first grade, that's a fact of life that doesn't give the Waldorf people panic attacks.Reading readiness, eighth-grade teacher Carol Steil told me, coincides with a child's first loss of baby teeth, and that often occurs long after kindergarten.
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SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | April 19, 2008
Steve McNair was tougher than a piece of cheap beef jerky. Erik Bedard is as soft as wet Kleenex. Who knows whether either of those statements is even remotely true, but they've become almost gospel to fans in our small part of the sports universe. We admire the way McNair played through pain, gritting his teeth and dragging his bruised and battered body onto the field each Sunday. And we snickered with glee when we saw Bedard going on the disabled list (yet again) with an injury because it confirms our belief the Orioles made the right move in trading him. One athlete was tough; the other was not. Problem is, it's rarely that simple.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 11, 1997
Airman Gayla Zigo took aim at Lt. Kelly Flinn, and Gen. Joseph Ralston crashed. In military parlance, that's called collateral damage.The Irish will accept adultery but not divorce by their political leaders. Americans are the other way round.If he can't get a tax increase, the mayor may feel compelled to close down the City Council.They let anyone into the Congressional Country Club these days.Pub Date: 6/11/97
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PHILLIPS and MICHAEL PHILLIPS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 24, 2006
Some worthy pictures - Syriana being an example - work better the second time, which doesn't help you the first time, but there it is. Other films do their jobs effectively, owing more to reasons of blunt narrative force than of distinctive filmmaking, paying off less well on a repeat visit. Tsotsi, this year's foreign-language Academy Award winner, is a film to see once. Its mixture of grit and corniness leaves a bittersweet aftertaste. All the same, you're shaken up by what happens even as you're made aware of certain melodramatic methods employed - menacing, percussive music, slow zooms (great paradoxical moviemaking parlance there)
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
Joseph Leahy, a husky 19-year-old from Long Island, N.Y., entered the gates of the Naval Academy early yesterday, following in his mother's footsteps. Leahy, son of one of the first female graduates of the academy, was one of about 1,200 plebes to arrive at the Annapolis military college for the punishing yearly ritual known as Induction Day. Noreen Leahy, a former naval officer who graduated with the second wave of academy women in 1981, watched her oldest child cross over from civilian to military life.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PHILLIPS and MICHAEL PHILLIPS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 24, 2006
Some worthy pictures - Syriana being an example - work better the second time, which doesn't help you the first time, but there it is. Other films do their jobs effectively, owing more to reasons of blunt narrative force than of distinctive filmmaking, paying off less well on a repeat visit. Tsotsi, this year's foreign-language Academy Award winner, is a film to see once. Its mixture of grit and corniness leaves a bittersweet aftertaste. All the same, you're shaken up by what happens even as you're made aware of certain melodramatic methods employed - menacing, percussive music, slow zooms (great paradoxical moviemaking parlance there)
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | February 21, 1992
LAUREL -- Question put to trainer Dale Capuano before yesterday's featured eighth race:Who's got the best 3-year-olds on the grounds?Capuano: They're all in this race.Not quite. But close.The $16,000 allowance was treated like a mini-stakes, a preview for some of the more talented local 3-year-olds, and a possible showcase for the speedy gelding Pie In Your Eye.Pie In Your Eye, after sending the keepers of speed figures into orbit in only one winning career start, was bet down to 3-5 odds.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | April 19, 2008
Steve McNair was tougher than a piece of cheap beef jerky. Erik Bedard is as soft as wet Kleenex. Who knows whether either of those statements is even remotely true, but they've become almost gospel to fans in our small part of the sports universe. We admire the way McNair played through pain, gritting his teeth and dragging his bruised and battered body onto the field each Sunday. And we snickered with glee when we saw Bedard going on the disabled list (yet again) with an injury because it confirms our belief the Orioles made the right move in trading him. One athlete was tough; the other was not. Problem is, it's rarely that simple.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | November 8, 1998
THE BLAME game is in full effect. For sure, the national Republican Party, and some of its branch offices, Maryland included, are in disarray and deep crisis.Tuesday's elections bore an ill wind so strong that many in the GOP will have trouble comprehending their weakened national position to think rationally about solutions. It is much too early to discern whether the blows suffered have rendered them senseless or maybe will knock some sense into their hard heads.Reverberations have the sound and feel of aftershocks from an earthquake.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel | September 22, 2005
THE TWO-PAGE letter was handwritten - and seemingly heartfelt. It came last week from Toho Lee, the owner of Roland Billiards, a pool parlor on 25th Street near Greenmount Avenue at the edge of the Harwood community in North Baltimore. "Business is tough in this ghetto area with all kinds of crime and hassel [sic]," it reads in part. "Last year, I almost folded up my business. ... Please help me." Six and a half years ago, I had written a story when Lee opened his 20-table poolroom in an abandoned print shop in this troubled patch of the city.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel | September 22, 2005
THE TWO-PAGE letter was handwritten - and seemingly heartfelt. It came last week from Toho Lee, the owner of Roland Billiards, a pool parlor on 25th Street near Greenmount Avenue at the edge of the Harwood community in North Baltimore. "Business is tough in this ghetto area with all kinds of crime and hassel [sic]," it reads in part. "Last year, I almost folded up my business. ... Please help me." Six and a half years ago, I had written a story when Lee opened his 20-table poolroom in an abandoned print shop in this troubled patch of the city.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
Joseph Leahy, a husky 19-year-old from Long Island, N.Y., entered the gates of the Naval Academy early yesterday, following in his mother's footsteps. Leahy, son of one of the first female graduates of the academy, was one of about 1,200 plebes to arrive at the Annapolis military college for the punishing yearly ritual known as Induction Day. Noreen Leahy, a former naval officer who graduated with the second wave of academy women in 1981, watched her oldest child cross over from civilian to military life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elisabeth Bumiller and Elisabeth Bumiller,New York Times News Service | January 13, 2002
Like a cantankerous parent telling teen-agers they can't have the family car for a road trip, President Bush announced in California recently that the Democrats would reverse his tax cuts of last year "over my dead body." Actually, Bush said "not over my dead body," thereby mangling a familiar idiom, but the crowd's roar of approval indicated that everyone knew what he meant. So did the headline writers, making the president's "my dead body" the first memorable Bushism of 2002, and the first since Sept.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | November 8, 1998
THE BLAME game is in full effect. For sure, the national Republican Party, and some of its branch offices, Maryland included, are in disarray and deep crisis.Tuesday's elections bore an ill wind so strong that many in the GOP will have trouble comprehending their weakened national position to think rationally about solutions. It is much too early to discern whether the blows suffered have rendered them senseless or maybe will knock some sense into their hard heads.Reverberations have the sound and feel of aftershocks from an earthquake.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
FIRST, LET'S PUT the myth to rest.The Waldorf School does not delay the teaching of reading until the second or third grade.What the North Baltimore private school does do is pay close attention to the physical and intellectual development of children. If some pupils are not quite ready to read by the first grade, that's a fact of life that doesn't give the Waldorf people panic attacks.Reading readiness, eighth-grade teacher Carol Steil told me, coincides with a child's first loss of baby teeth, and that often occurs long after kindergarten.
NEWS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
So you're just back from the computer store with your new toy. Congratulations! It's the latest, it's the most powerful, it's . . . wait a minute, now . . . obsolete.The headlong rush of computer technology is nothing new. Each week brings advertisements for personal computers with faster processors, more memory, fatter disk drives.If the auto industry moved at the same rate, some have said, a Rolls-Royce would cost a quarter and drive to the moon on a gallon of gas.That computer you just bought will still be in the stores a year from now, if experience holds, for about half the cost.
NEWS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
So you're just back from the computer store with your new toy. Congratulations! It's the latest, it's the most powerful, it's . . . wait a minute, now . . . obsolete.The headlong rush of computer technology is nothing new. Each week brings advertisements for personal computers with faster processors, more memory, fatter disk drives.If the auto industry moved at the same rate, some have said, a Rolls-Royce would cost a quarter and drive to the moon on a gallon of gas.That computer you just bought will still be in the stores a year from now, if experience holds, for about half the cost.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 1996
BORDEN, Prince Edward Island -- Prince Edward Island always has defined itself as a place apart from the rest of the world. The people who live here refer to it simply as The Island, and divide themselves into "Islanders" -- those born here -- and "CFAs," which stands for "Come From Away."The rust-colored hills furrowed with potato plants and the clapboard houses fronted with wide, covered porches seem unchanged from 100 years ago. Much of the ambience stems from the difficulty of getting here: There's the little airport near the capital of Charlottetown and two ferry routes, only one of which runs all year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1997
Is everything old really new again?That's the way it seems with movie theaters, where the trend favors huge, multiscreen complexes reminiscent of the movie palaces of old, those spacious, elaborate, ornate theaters that were as distinctive as the movies themselves.Complete with state-of-the-art sound, state-of-the-art seats and state-of-the-art projection systems, these "megaplexes" -- as they're known in theater-owner parlance -- have begun to displace the generic let's-see-how- many-screens-we-can-fit-into-a-corner -of-the-mall theaters that sprouted like weeds throughout the '70s and '80s.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1997
Sebastian Junger used to measure the cost of everything in tree work.As a tree trimmer -- a "high climber" in his parlance -- he could earn as much as $1,000 a day. Even the smallest job paid at least $200. So the health insurance policy he bought for himself, that was $900, or about a day of tree work. The deductible was $2,000 -- two days of tree work, and it proved to be a real bargain in 1991, the year he broke his right hand, then cut his calf while on the job.It's hard for a right-hander to get the back of the left leg. But Junger had reached behind himself one-handed and lost control of the chain saw, which was revving at 500 mph. (That's the kind of detail Junger loves, that 500 mph part.
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