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Editorial from The Aegis | January 14, 2014
Dissent over the latest Harford County appropriations for parkland appear motivated by political gamesmanship in this election year, rather than actual concern for public recreational opportunities. Be it a grouping of properties associated with the waterfront, a building of some historic import in Bel Air, a soccer field in Aberdeen or a swimming pool facility in Joppa, there are good reasons for local governments to purchase land for parks and recreation facilities across Harford County - and, sometimes, not so good ones.
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Letter to The Aegis | January 16, 2014
There has been some concern about the Joppatowne Swim Club Property. I would like to take a moment to address it. There is disappointment that the property owner has accepted another offer and the County will be unable to acquire the property. The County is obligated to go through a number of steps when looking to purchase property. The steps are governed by the County's procurement code and the requirements of any State or Federal agency providing funds. Most of the County's purchases of parkland are funded through Program Open Space, which is a grant from the Department of Natural Resources.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 21, 2000
Baltimore County added to its parkland yesterday when the state Board of Public Works approved the purchase of three east-county sites with $2.7 million in Program Open Space funds. Two of the parcels are in the Honeygo development area. They are 26.5 acres on the southside of Joppa Road, known as the Schwartz property, and the 22.5-acre Rangonese property on Cross Road -- both of which will be developed as a recreational parkland. Baltimore County is paying about $2 million for the two pieces of land.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 14, 2014
Dissent over the latest Harford County appropriations for parkland appear motivated by political gamesmanship in this election year, rather than actual concern for public recreational opportunities. Be it a grouping of properties associated with the waterfront, a building of some historic import in Bel Air, a soccer field in Aberdeen or a swimming pool facility in Joppa, there are good reasons for local governments to purchase land for parks and recreation facilities across Harford County - and, sometimes, not so good ones.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | March 25, 1991
Maryland environmentalists are watching with dismay as their 1990 victory to obtain more money for parkland appears to be slipping away this year.State officials have proposed deep cuts in parkland funds in recent months in an effort to balance the deficit-ridden budgets for fiscal years 1991 and 1992.Without more state money for parkland, environmental activist Mary Rosso fears, Maryland could lose open land to development."I think you're going to see lots and lots of land gobbled up by developers, and the land will be gone forever," the Glen Burnie resident said.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | September 3, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The state is delaying plans to buy parkland at 11 sites in Maryland at the risk of losing the properties to developers.State officials indefinitely postponed the plans yesterday at the insistence of Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein, who said Maryland's budget crisis is too severe for the state to borrow money to buy parkland."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
Barely 24 hours after scrapping plans to condemn a Perry Hall farm and turn it into a complex of athletic fields, a trio of Baltimore County officials drove to the fledgling Honeygo community to renew their land hunt.Among their stops was the Baltimore Airpark, potentially a site for a large, regional park. But developers have offered nearly $3 million for the land -- even though the property, absent an approved building plan, is appraised at $1.1 million."This is a perfect example of the dilemma we face," said Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, the Perry Hall Democrat behind the wheel for Tuesday afternoon's field trip.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1998
Interim state Comptroller Robert L. Swann said Maryland should convert an abandoned hospital in Marriottsville -- until this week under consideration for a controversial humanitarian center -- into parkland.At a Board of Public Works session Friday in Annapolis, Swann said it is time for the state Department of Natural Resources to take over the 70-acre Henryton Hospital property, which adjoins Patapsco State Park.The board, which includes Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Treasurer Richard N. Dixon, makes the final decision on the disposition of all state properties.
NEWS
July 24, 2005
How many acres of publicly accessible parkland does the county own? Anne Arundel County owns approximately 11,000 acres of parkland, all open to the public. Undeveloped areas are a large portion of that acreage - there are 4,500 acres of undeveloped, open space land that include hiking trails and forested areas frequented by bird watchers, with virtually no landscaping. The next-largest component of the total parkland is the county's community and athletic parks, which have approximately 4,000 acres.
NEWS
July 21, 2012
Ironically, while Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is wisely planting needed foliage in the North Point area, he and the county school board are planning to tear down 10 beautiful wooded acres of unique, forested parkland in Mays Chapel North ("Nearly 1,000 new trees planted in Baltimore County," July 18). The contradiction is astounding. Mr. Kamenetz affirms quite correctly that "of all the strategies that make a difference in our environment, few are as effective as trees.
NEWS
By Louise Vest | December 10, 2013
50 Years Ago A park is born In a Times article: "The first area to be acquired in the Howard County Parkland Plan, the Bethany area, has been approved by the park board and the commissioners and steps will be soon underway toward purchase. "The commissioners were asked to approve an engineering study to be made in the Middle Patuxent Area to determine the feasibility of the construction of a future water supply reservoir. "This was the suggestion of Senator James Clark, who pointed out that this is the last section suitable for a dam to supply Howard County with water.
NEWS
July 21, 2012
Ironically, while Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is wisely planting needed foliage in the North Point area, he and the county school board are planning to tear down 10 beautiful wooded acres of unique, forested parkland in Mays Chapel North ("Nearly 1,000 new trees planted in Baltimore County," July 18). The contradiction is astounding. Mr. Kamenetz affirms quite correctly that "of all the strategies that make a difference in our environment, few are as effective as trees.
NEWS
April 3, 2010
Only 13 years ago, we fought this fight, and I thought we won. Now I read again of plans to build on the same parcel of city park land ("In face of cuts, city OKs funds for park building," April 1). STV Inc's proposal for the Parks and People Foundation includes multiple parking lots, major additons, driveways and clearing in what is an area resplendent with 100-year-old trees and innumerable forms of wildlife. Our green spaces ought to be protected and preserved. It was written in The Sun then that "selling off our heritage to further exacerbate urban blight and decay is morally wrong," and it is true today.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
State and local officials are looking to buy a 190-acre waterfront farm in eastern Baltimore County from a developer, even though the partly wooded spread on Back River scored poorly on a rating system the state uses to rank potential purchases for parkland. No deal has been reached, and no one would reveal what price has been discussed with developer Mark C. Sapperstein, who says he has spent at least $6 million to buy and improve the land. But county officials, who paid Sapperstein more than the appraised value of another property two years ago, say they would be "very interested" in acquiring Bauer's Farm to preserve it from development and to expand public access to the river and Chesapeake Bay. "Anytime Baltimore County could preserve a couple hundred acres of prime waterfront property and add it to the county's park inventory, that would always get our interest," said Don Mohler, spokesman for County Executive James T. Smith Jr. The farm, with nearly a mile of shoreline, adjoins 1,360-acre North Point State Park, which has a wading beach, fishing pier and hiking trails.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | February 28, 2008
The Board of Public Works yesterday unanimously approved a $5.75 million purchase of 30 acres in southern Anne Arundel County, even after Comptroller Peter Franchot questioned whether the price was $2 million too high. Franchot asked county and state officials whether an estimated $2 million in development costs by the current owners were included in the purchase price. He argued that the state should not be reimbursing the developers for those costs. "Are we paying way too much?" Franchot said.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun reporter | July 4, 2007
Harborplace has seen plenty of changes since its opening 27 years ago - on July 2, 1980 - brought national acclaim to Baltimore. And it remains a potent draw, with more than 100,000 people expected to gather there tonight to watch fireworks. But the latest addition to the Inner Harbor promenade has drawn opposition and revived long-standing concerns about commercial use of waterfront parkland. Nearly a dozen glass and metal kiosks have been installed near the two signature pavilions, selling items such as sunglasses, T-shirts, tanning lotion, handbags and sandals.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 16, 2014
There has been some concern about the Joppatowne Swim Club Property. I would like to take a moment to address it. There is disappointment that the property owner has accepted another offer and the County will be unable to acquire the property. The County is obligated to go through a number of steps when looking to purchase property. The steps are governed by the County's procurement code and the requirements of any State or Federal agency providing funds. Most of the County's purchases of parkland are funded through Program Open Space, which is a grant from the Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
In a continuing effort to acquire parkland for the Perry Hall-White Marsh area, Baltimore County officials are looking to purchase 25 acres slated for development near Seven Oaks Elementary School.Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, a Perry Hall Democrat, will introduce a bill Monday night that would halt development of the tract until the county decides whether to acquire it.Developer Tom Sperl has submitted plans to build 51 houses on the tract off Seven Courts Drive, which is known as the Brewer property.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | February 6, 2007
A plan for Baltimore County to buy parkland next to a high school on the east side won approval of the County Council last night. The measure, approved unanimously, authorizes the county administration to pay $900,000 to a developer for about 20 acres near Sparrows Point High School in Edgemere. County officials say the property, some of which is wetlands, would be used for parks and recreation, perhaps by a high school science magnet program. "At a time when we're losing precious green space, I think this is an opportunity where we can acquire green space and parkland near the water," said Councilman John A. Olszewski Sr., a Dundalk Democrat whose district includes the land.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
The Thunder Hill Park Alliance, a nonprofit group formed in 2003 to encourage protection and thoughtful development of the Smith property, has elected officers and a board of directors. The 300-acre site in the middle of Columbia was purchased by Howard County government and the state after the death of its owner for development as a regional park. After hiring a consultant with grant funds supplied by the Horizon Foundation, the Thunder Hill Park Alliance decided to advocate developing the land as an interactive nature park with a children's adventure area, protecting specimen trees, flora and fauna and the wildlife movement corridor within the site.
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