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NEWS
April 26, 2014
My husband was diagnosed with Parkinson's at the young age of 38! He was very athletic, and sports were such a part of his life. For 24 years, he bravely fought this devastating disease, with all his heart and soul - and mine too! ( "Parkinson's takes a toll on families too," April 24.) We were in it together. He passed away August 24, 2013. What a wonderful person, he was. It truly took a toll on both of us, as he watched helplessly as I took care of him. The last year, I lost 30 pounds, doing it all. Boy, do I have the experience of a caregiver and Parkinson's!
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 28, 2014
I want to thank U.S. Sen. Cory Booker for his article, "Parkinson's takes a toll on families, too" (April 23). I have Parkinson's, and my caregivers are my husband and my 24-year-old daughter. I can't tell you what I would do if I did not have them. I have no friends or family who check in on me unless they see me, then they ask how am I doing. Mr. Booker's mother was so lucky to have a support group that came around to see her and help out. Thank you very much for your positive article.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Sometimes it's easy for Vincent Vono to feel down about having to live with Parkinson's disease. The disease has snatched his independence and sense of a normal life. The 76-year-old stopped driving last year as his motor skills slowed. He doesn't cook much because it is too exhausting to clean up afterward. Even a short walk across his tiny apartment is a task some days. But for all the disease has taken away from Vono, it has fostered and strengthened a love for art that first developed when he was a boy. Painting is the one thing that still comes easily to Vono.
NEWS
By Cory Booker | April 23, 2014
This year, approximately 60,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Parkinson's, joining the 1 million people already living with the disease in the United States and the 4 million to 6 million diagnosed with it worldwide. Their painful struggle is one that I know all too well. I remember when my dad first had symptoms of Parkinson's, a motor system disorder that results from the loss of certain brain cells. For him, it started with a persistent numbness in his arm and hand that led to a decades-long battle with the ever-increasing symptoms that eventually took his life in 2013.
NEWS
December 19, 2008
On December 16, 2008,LAURETTA M. PARKINSON. Survived by children Nathaniel Parkinson, Jr., and Quesnay Epps, brother Melvin Smith, sisters, Paulette McNeill, and Claudette Leach, and a host of other family and friends. Family will receive friends at the family owned WYLIE FUNERAL HOME of BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road Friday from 6-8 P.M. Services will be held Saturday at the Harlem Park Community Baptist Church, 614 N. Gilmor St., 10:00A.M. wake 10:30A.M. funeral. Interment Following.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | February 12, 1991
Dennis H. Parkinson, a top state budget officer, was named Monday tohead Anne Arundel's budget department.Parkinson's appointment comes less than three weeks after County Executive Robert R. Neall pushed a bill through the County Council increasing the allowable starting salary for top-ranking administrators hired from outside county government.The bill was designed specifically with Parkinson in mind. Neall has been wooing him ever since former county budget officer Marita Brown resigned to take a post in another county.
NEWS
By John Fauber and John Fauber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 15, 2005
Women who have had their ovaries removed are twice as likely to later develop Parkinson's disease, according to new research. The Mayo Clinic said the increased risk may be the result of losing the natural, brain-protecting effect of estrogen, and preliminary data suggest that risk also may apply to Alzheimer's disease. The study, presented Wednesday at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in Miami Beach, Fla., is the first to show a direct link between Parkinson's and ovary removal, a procedure known as an oophorectomy, said lead author Walter Rocca.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Boston Globe | July 4, 1995
Until recently, Richard Weeden, 49, a mechanical engineer from Portsmouth, R.I., was losing his 20-year battle against Parkinson's disease. So was Tony Johnson, 57, a civil engineer from Taunton, Mass.Day after day, like many of the 1.5 million similarly stricken Americans, they endured the Ping-Pong hell of Parkinson's -- bouncing between rigidity caused by the disease, which can make even turning over in bed impossible, and the jerky movements caused by the medicine, L-dopa, used to treat it.Today, Mr. Weeden and Mr. Johnson -- and hundreds of patients like them -- are cautiously excited about surgical treatments that are sweeping like wildfire through the once-quiet world of Parkinson's.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2001
WASHINGTON - Muhammad Ali, who used to fling physical and verbal jabs with dazzling speed, was honored yesterday for championing research into the disease that has slowed his gait and virtually silenced his voice. His hands trembling and his face managing nothing more than an impish smile, Ali received the public service award of the Society for Neuroscience. He and his wife, Lonnie Ali, have toured the country raising awareness of Parkinson's disease and rallying support for increased funding for research.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Arizona Republic | January 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Morris K. Udall has been trying to stand up lately. Relatives say the former basketball player will shift his long legs toward the edge of his hospital bed and wait for nurses to help so he won't fall.Parkinson's disease has affected Mr. Udall's balance enough that he cannot realistically expect to support himself.Still, he tries.A year after a fall bruised his brain, the good news is that Mr. Udall is still trying. The 69-year-old Arizona congressional legend receives scores of visitors, listens to classical music and, on occasion, leaves the Veterans Affairs Medical Center to spend a day in his suburban Virginia home.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Sometimes it's easy for Vincent Vono to feel down about having to live with Parkinson's disease. The disease has snatched his independence and sense of a normal life. The 76-year-old stopped driving last year as his motor skills slowed. He doesn't cook much because it is too exhausting to clean up afterward. Even a short walk across his tiny apartment is a task some days. But for all the disease has taken away from Vono, it has fostered and strengthened a love for art that first developed when he was a boy. Painting is the one thing that still comes easily to Vono.
SPORTS
From Sun news services | September 10, 2012
The Towson University men's and women's lacrosse teams will participate in the Play for Parkinson's tournament on Oct. 6 and 7 at Episcopal High in Alexandria, Va. The two-day event brings together 11 Division I men's and women's lacrosse teams. The tournament raises money for the ProjectSpark Foundation, which aims to eradicate Parkinson's disease. The men's lacrosse action will take place on Saturday, Oct. 6 between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. The men's field includes Air Force, Georgetown, Princeton, Virginia and Towson.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 28, 2012
On the day the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the central provisions of the federal health care overhaul he has championed as Maryland's most visible public health official, Dr. Peter Beilenson revealed, publicly and for the first time, that he has Parkinson's disease. He brought it up during my WYPR radio show Thursday afternoon, and he mentioned it to television reporters who chased him for a sound bite after the court's historic ruling. "I was diagnosed five years ago," said Beilenson, 52, the chief health officer of Howard County and former health commissioner of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Craig Clary, cclary@patuxent.com | June 12, 2012
Jimmy Magee, a Cockeysville resident and tennis player for Boys' Latin Middle School, hopes to someday play for the Lakers' varsity tennis team. But what he's doing on the courts thisFather's Day, June 17, could make any contribution he eventually makes for the Lakers pale in comparison. Magee, an ambassador for the charitable organization, Kids Play For Good, is spearheading a doubles tennis tournament to fightParkinson's Disease, and support his uncle, Bryant Waters, who has the disease.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Although doctors often advise Parkinson's disease patients to exercise — and the more intense the exercise, the better — new research from the University of Maryland Medical Center shows that long walks at a more comfortable pace may be the best medicine. Dr. Lisa M. Shulman, co-director of the University of Maryland Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, made the surprise discovery recently that low-intensity workouts make the most difference in mobility and gait, which become a problem for most of those who sufferer from the disease.
NEWS
By Michael J. Fox | December 15, 2010
Years ago, diseases like cancer and HIV/AIDS presented patients with an imminent death sentence. While there's no doubt that receiving a diagnosis of serious illness remains a life-changer, today many patients with conditions like these can look forward to a much brighter prognosis, thanks to new and better therapies and the researchers who have dedicated their lives to developing them. Yet no matter how many researchers join the effort to find treatments that improve patients' lives, the endeavor cannot move forward without the active involvement of another group of participants.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1996
Animal studies offer hope that drugs similar to the ones that revolutionized organ transplants are capable of repairing nerves damaged by Parkinson's and other degenerative diseases, a Johns Hopkins scientist said yesterday.Dr. Solomon Snyder, director of neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, said the class of drugs restored movement in mice and rats suffering from a Parkinson's-like syndrome. The medications caused damaged nerve cells to regrow the long projections that help transmit impulses from the brain to muscles and limbs.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
A former National Football League running back whose three-year career ended after a helmet-to-helmet hit in a training camp scrimmage with the Washington Redskins three seasons ago has filed suit in federal court in Baltimore, claiming that he is being shortchanged on his disability payments. Eric Shelton, who said he was forced to retire with what was diagnosed as stenosis of the spine, or a narrowing of the spinal column, is seeking more than $18,000 a month — the highest disability payment allowed under the current collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association.
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