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Parking Fines

NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
Judges of the state's highest court pointedly grilled the lawyer for the University of Maryland yesterday as she argued that federal law bars the school administration from releasing records of campus parking fines assessed to student athletes.Three of the seven judges challenged Dawna Cobb's assertion that parking fine records are educational records protected by federal law, asking why they weren't considered criminal records, which would be public.One judge wondered if it is fair to other Marylanders that the university guards the secrecy of student parking fine records but tells the Motor Vehicle Administration about other unpaid violations.
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NEWS
October 3, 1997
PLENTY OF things deserve the protection of confidentiality. Parking fines are not among them.When parking spaces are as rare as they are at University of Maryland College Park, the competition for finding one can be as fierce as an NCAA basketball play-off.So imagine how students, faculty and administrators must have felt to learn a couple of years ago that a basketball player had found his own way of shutting out the competition by parking pretty much as he pleased -- accumulating more than $8,000 in fines in the process.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 2, 1997
ON BEHALF of parking ticketees everywhere I wish, like Spiro Agnew, to plead nolo contendere. There, is everyone happy? I once set a college record for most parking tickets in a single semester, and if anyone around here should be blushing, it ain't me, and maybe it shouldn't be those basketball players pursued by the University of Maryland student newspaper, the Diamondback.You read about this, didn't you? Yesterday we carried it on the front page of this very newspaper. The Diamondback wants to reveal names of basketball players at College Park who may have racked up big money in campus parking fines, and the university says, "Mind your own business."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Tom Pelton contributed to this article | October 1, 1997
The Diamondback, the University of Maryland's student newspaper, went looking for basketball stars who might have racked up thousands of dollars in parking fines and ran into a brick wall with university officials.Now, the paper's staff is hoping the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court, will force the university to give up parking fine records for basketball team members in what could be a watershed case on student records.The arguments, scheduled Oct. 7 in Annapolis, have attracted the attention of five national journalism organizations that have filed briefs in support of the newspaper, as well as the U.S. Department of Education and the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which support the university's position.
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 1997
Lyn Backe's column is running today because the Anne Arundel edition of The Sun was not published yesterday, Memorial Day.FOR THOSE of us who venture into downtown Annapolis daily to work, weekly to dine, often to shop, there is good news from the city Department of Parking and Transportation. The Parking and Fines Division will be open an hour longer to give us more time to pay our tickets.The office at 308 Chinquapin Round Road will be open from 8: 30 a.m. to 5: 30 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.
NEWS
March 25, 1997
PARKING VIOLATORS aren't cheering, but the new parking system for Ellicott City's historic district has generated a windfall since it took effect last July. Parking enforcers have dished out $85,514 in tickets, plus change, from new meters. Parking spaces are easier to find to the delight of shoppers and tourists, at least to those who don't overstay their welcome.Except for special occasions, there never has been a lack of parking spaces in the historic district. The area has 1,050 spaces, including 180 on Main Street.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1997
Ellicott City's new parking plan appears to be working -- judging from its first eight months of receipts -- but merchants will have to wait before they can reap the economic benefits they were promised.The controversial plan, which began in July, includes meters in some public lots, tough enforcement in tow-away zones and a private firm to ticket motorists in the historic commercial district, which has long been troubled by parking problems.Many merchants opposed the plan, fearing that the ticketing of errant parkers would scare off customers.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Dana Hedgpeth and Brad Snyder and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- The day after Maryland point guard Duane Simpkins publicly apologized for accepting an improper loan to pay campus parking fines, he received another ticket.Simpkins, a senior who sat out the final game of a three-game, NCAA-imposed suspension last night, received a $20 ticket Feb. 17 for parking in a space not assigned to him. According to parking records obtained by The Sun, he has received 17 tickets and incurred $290 in fines since he discussed this problem with coach Gary Williams in November.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ken Murray and contributing writer Dana Hedgpeth provided information for this article | February 22, 1996
Maryland senior guard Duane Simpkins racked up $8,000 worth of unpaid campus parking fines in part because he repeatedly received $250 tickets for parking in spaces reserved for the disabled, athletic department sources said.To pay part of the fines, Simpkins accepted a loan that resulted in a three-game NCAA suspension. He is serving the final game of his suspension tonight at N.C. State.Simpkins borrowed $2,000 from his former Amateur Athletic Union coach, Donnie Gross. He had to make a down payment to register for spring classes and to be eligible to play for the remainder of the season.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
Kenny Hall is a night-shift guard at a prison, so he understands the importance of paying debts. That is why he showed up at the city's parking fines section at 7:30 a.m. yesterday -- an hour before the office opened.Mr. Hall, 31, was at the front of yesterday's line to take advantage of the city's second parking amnesty, which began Aug. 1. The program, last offered in the fall of 1992, allows parking scofflaws to pay off delinquent tickets without shelling out for the hundreds of dollars they owe in late fees.
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