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NEWS
February 2, 1991
Richard C. Parkhurst, who retired as a vice president in sales for Baker-Webster Printing Co. of Washington, died Jan. 27 after a heart attack at his home in Colesville.A memorial service for Mr. Parkhurst, who was 61, was held yesterday at the Hines/Rinaldi Funeral Home in Silver Spring.He retired last year after working nearly 40 years for Baker-Webster.A native of Stratford-on-Avon, N.J., he was stationed in Washington while serving in the Navy in the late 1940s. In 1954, he earned a business degree at the University of Maryland.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 5, 2010
Martha Leich Parkhurst, who founded the Baltimore Museum of Art's development office and was a voice for governmental arts support, died Tuesday of pneumonia at the Blakehurst Retirement Community. She was 97. Born Martha Leich in Evansville, Ind., she earned an economics degree at Wellesley College and worked for a Wall Street investment firm. She married her boss, Martin Pfahler. After his death a decade later, she married Baltimore attorney George V. Parkhurst. The couple lived for many years in Roland Park.
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NEWS
By ALISA SAMUELS and ALISA SAMUELS,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
George Veasey Parkhurst, the court auditor for Baltimore City Circuit Court who was proud to be admitted to the Maryland bar on the same day as the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, died Friday at Union Memorial Hospital of post-operative heart and lung complications after a fall. He was 88.Mr. Parkhurst, a Roland Park resident, was appointed court auditor in 1965 and served until his death. Earlier, he practiced corporate, real estate and probate law at his father's firm in Baltimore.
NEWS
July 17, 2004
On July 15, 2004, WARREN EDWARD HERRMAN, beloved husband of Susan "Bernice" Comes Herrman; devoted father of Patricia A. Parkhurst and her husband David M. Parkhurst; also survived by two grandchildren, Christine M. Dunnett and Bryan M. Parkhurst, and four great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends at the Lassahn Funeral Home, Inc., 7401 Belair Road (Overlea) on Sunday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Joseph Church on Monday at 11 A.M. A Christian Wake Service will be held on Sunday, 2:30 P.M. Interment St. Joseph Church Cemetery.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 2008
Charles Parkhurst, a museum director in Baltimore and Washington and one of the "monuments men," an Allied Forces team that chased down leads, pried open crates and snooped around museums, salt mines and castles in search of art stolen by the Nazis during World War II, died Thursday at his home in Amherst, Mass. He was 95. His death was confirmed by his wife, Carol Clark. From 1962 to 1970, Mr. Parkhurst was director of the Baltimore Museum of Art. Mr. Parkhurst's tenure in Baltimore was marked by a $5 million to $7 million increase in the worth of the museum's collection, a figure he estimated in a 1973 Sun article.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
In 1964-65, Parkhurst did not issue hockey cards, and Topps' cards grew to 2 1/2 by 4 11/16 inches. The "Tall Boys" are coming back this month, but they'll be Parkies.Last year, Brian Price, president of Parkhurst, created the "Missing Link" set, his conception of what the 1956-57 cards would have looked like had Parkhurst chosen to issue a set that season.This year, he's chosen the "Tall Boy" concept for another set Parkhurst never made, cards for the '64-65 season (the last original Parkhurst set was 1963-64)
SPORTS
March 7, 1993
Parkhurst hockey cards are back for a second season in their Pro Set era beginning with a 240-card Series 1. All cards are in English and French. There is an eight-card insert set of reprints of goalies from 1950s Parkhurst sets. Look for rookies, new teams (even Chris Kontos on Tampa Bay) and new jerseys (Pittsburgh, Hartford, Toronto, New Jersey).
NEWS
July 17, 2004
On July 15, 2004, WARREN EDWARD HERRMAN, beloved husband of Susan "Bernice" Comes Herrman; devoted father of Patricia A. Parkhurst and her husband David M. Parkhurst; also survived by two grandchildren, Christine M. Dunnett and Bryan M. Parkhurst, and four great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends at the Lassahn Funeral Home, Inc., 7401 Belair Road (Overlea) on Sunday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Joseph Church on Monday at 11 A.M. A Christian Wake Service will be held on Sunday, 2:30 P.M. Interment St. Joseph Church Cemetery.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1998
A former manager for Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. is suing the company, saying he was denied a promotion because he is white.John Parkhurst of Arlington, Texas, filed the civil rights suit yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.The suit contends that Sylvan President Douglas L. Becker did not make Parkhurst a vice president in charge of contract sales because most of the education and testing company's customers -- superintendents of large, urban public school systems -- are black.
NEWS
July 24, 1997
John L. Parkhurst, 48, writing instructorJohn L. Parkhurst, who had been a writing instructor and proofreader, died of a heart attack Thursday at his Perry Hall home. He was 48.Born in Baltimore, Mr. Parkhurst graduated from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute in 1966 and in 1970 from Dartmouth College, where he earned cum laude honors and was awarded a research fellowship in political science at the University of Massachusetts.As a participant in the Louisiana Tech University Foreign Study Program, he taught English and creative writing in Rome from 1971 to 1972.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - Carolyn Parkhurst types on her silver laptop at a small table in her neighborhood Starbucks most afternoons. The 32-year-old writer, whose first novel has soared in popularity since its June release, is anonymous in this Washington coffee shop. Both the Book of the Month Club and NBC's Today Book Club picked Parkhurst's The Dogs of Babel as their June selection. Her novel also enjoyed five weeks on the New York Times Best Sellers List. She took a break from her writing one recent afternoon to sit outside the coffee shop and talk about her novel.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1998
A former manager for Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. is suing the company, saying he was denied a promotion because he is white.John Parkhurst of Arlington, Texas, filed the civil rights suit yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.The suit contends that Sylvan President Douglas L. Becker did not make Parkhurst a vice president in charge of contract sales because most of the education and testing company's customers -- superintendents of large, urban public school systems -- are black.
NEWS
July 24, 1997
John L. Parkhurst, 48, writing instructorJohn L. Parkhurst, who had been a writing instructor and proofreader, died of a heart attack Thursday at his Perry Hall home. He was 48.Born in Baltimore, Mr. Parkhurst graduated from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute in 1966 and in 1970 from Dartmouth College, where he earned cum laude honors and was awarded a research fellowship in political science at the University of Massachusetts.As a participant in the Louisiana Tech University Foreign Study Program, he taught English and creative writing in Rome from 1971 to 1972.
NEWS
By ALISA SAMUELS and ALISA SAMUELS,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
George Veasey Parkhurst, the court auditor for Baltimore City Circuit Court who was proud to be admitted to the Maryland bar on the same day as the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, died Friday at Union Memorial Hospital of post-operative heart and lung complications after a fall. He was 88.Mr. Parkhurst, a Roland Park resident, was appointed court auditor in 1965 and served until his death. Earlier, he practiced corporate, real estate and probate law at his father's firm in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
In the land of Parkhurst, which Brian Price created two years ago, the NHL still has six teams and a lot of its players have crewcuts.Price's Parkhurst Hockey Cards are back for a third season of old-fashioned fun. Price, who collected "Parkies" as a child, purchased controlling interest in the venerable name and has been creating "what-if" sets.The original Parkhurst cards were produced from 1951-52 to 1963-64, except for the 1956-57 season. Price's first Parkies were the "Missing Link" set, that of 1956-57.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
In 1964-65, Parkhurst did not issue hockey cards, and Topps' cards grew to 2 1/2 by 4 11/16 inches. The "Tall Boys" are coming back this month, but they'll be Parkies.Last year, Brian Price, president of Parkhurst, created the "Missing Link" set, his conception of what the 1956-57 cards would have looked like had Parkhurst chosen to issue a set that season.This year, he's chosen the "Tall Boy" concept for another set Parkhurst never made, cards for the '64-65 season (the last original Parkhurst set was 1963-64)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
In the land of Parkhurst, which Brian Price created two years ago, the NHL still has six teams and a lot of its players have crewcuts.Price's Parkhurst Hockey Cards are back for a third season of old-fashioned fun. Price, who collected "Parkies" as a child, purchased controlling interest in the venerable name and has been creating "what-if" sets.The original Parkhurst cards were produced from 1951-52 to 1963-64, except for the 1956-57 season. Price's first Parkies were the "Missing Link" set, that of 1956-57.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
From 1951-52 to 1963-64, hockey fans collected Parkhurst cards.Except in the 1956-57 season, when there were no hockey cards, Parkhurst's or anyone else's.Next month collectors can begin filling that gap with the Parkhurst "missing link" series.Brian Price, a lifelong hockey fan and collector, is the guiding force behind the cards, which will be produced by Upper Deck.Two card dealers purchased the rights to the Parkhurst name in 1986. Price got involved in 1990 and now has the controlling interest.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
From 1951-52 to 1963-64, hockey fans collected Parkhurst cards.Except in the 1956-57 season, when there were no hockey cards, Parkhurst's or anyone else's.Next month collectors can begin filling that gap with the Parkhurst "missing link" series.Brian Price, a lifelong hockey fan and collector, is the guiding force behind the cards, which will be produced by Upper Deck.Two card dealers purchased the rights to the Parkhurst name in 1986. Price got involved in 1990 and now has the controlling interest.
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