Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPark System
IN THE NEWS

Park System

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2004
Bill Sann, 41, of Parkton had a simple wish for how to spend Father's Day: to take a bicycle ride through Baltimore's parks with his wife, Barbara, and their 3-year-old daughter, Nicole. So the Sann family joined about 225 other riders yesterday in the city's second annual Tour du Park ride. For the outdoorsy couple, biking has been a bond since the beginning of their courtship, which began on a blind date and found common ground in a bicycle hike across the state. "My mom told me, you've got to find someone you can cycle with," said Bill Sann, a sales engineer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | May 8, 2013
A Roland Park resident has created a "passport" to Druid Hill Park. Janet Felsten, founder and director of the nonprofit group Baltimore Green Map, introduced the green-colored passport April 19 at a Baltimore Green Week kickoff party in the conservatory. Felsten said she created the 20-page, passport-shaped booklet on cover stock paper as a companion to a detailed map of Druid Hill Park that she made in 2010. The purpose of the map and the new passport is partly to point out places of interest in the 745-acre park, which is home to the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, Druid Lake and the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens, among other attractions.
Advertisement
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 23, 2012
Baltimore's historic park system ranks 15th among the nation's 40 largest cities in a new rating released Wednesday, which credits the city's foresight in carving out public spaces over the past two centuries but faults its more recent leadership for not maintaining that investment. The nonprofit Trust for Public Land gave Baltimore's 4,900 acres of parks three out of a possible five "park benches," or stars, in its ParkScore rating system. The city got high marks for the accessibility of its parks, with 85 percent of residents able to reach one within a 10-minute walk.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | April 2, 2013
A section of Shamrock Park in Bel Air may end up getting some major upgrades, or at least town officials are talking about the possibility. Some of the early discussion includes installing additional playground equipment, defined pathways and shade trees on either side of the Humbert Amphitheater, and all of these suggestions deserve the full attention of the Board of Town Commissioners. There's good reason to want to keep Shamrock Park in top shape. It's one of the crown jewels of a top-flight municipal park system in Bel Air. The maintenance of park space is a municipal responsibility on par with keeping streets and sewers up to standard and providing police protection.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE | February 14, 2006
Connie A. Brown, 60, who has served as the acting director of the city Department of Recreation and Parks since last summer, will be named permanent director today by Mayor Martin O'Malley. Before leading the department on an interim basis, the retired Army officer had served as its top official in the Bureau of Parks. He succeeds Kimberley A. Flowers, who held the $105,000-a-year post for three years before leaving to lead the Washington's parks department last year. The department oversees a 5,700-acre park system, 200 ball fields and 225 playgrounds, the mayor's office said.
NEWS
March 4, 1996
OLD FAITHFUL is losing steam pressure and its century-old reputation for reliability. The grand geyser at Yellowstone National Park has slowed down, with longer and less predictable intervals between super-heated eruptions. Earthquakes have altered the underground geology, objects tossed into the cone by curious visitors have clogged and chipped the geyser's vent, tapping of geothermal wells in the region may have affected the fragile geyser system.The nation's first national park, visited by over 3 million people a year, is facing other problems, too. Infected bison wander from the park, threatening the health of cattle.
NEWS
By Elisa Ung and Elisa Ung,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 16, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - Where a pristine ribbon of mowed lawn once nestled in Tacony Creek Park, bluestem is rising, yellow butterflies flutter about, and a red-tailed hawk flies overhead. "This is our heritage," biologist Richard Horwitz says, standing almost knee-deep in the new tall grass in the Northeast Philadelphia park, where native plants and wildlife are beginning to return. The Fairmount Park Commission has undertaken an ambitious project to restore the natural heritage to many city parks, leaving patches of grass free to grow wild.
NEWS
By Jacqueline M. Carrera | August 25, 2002
BALTIMOREANS want a healthier quality of life for their families, communities and businesses and, by working together, we can retake the recreation and parks system to help attract residents and visitors to our city. Cities throughout the country face similar challenges. Among them are the need to manage valuable public resources and human services for the parks with fewer dollars available from the city, state and federal governments. Competing city priorities such as education, police and housing have left recreation and parks with an insufficient and unstable funding base.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | October 13, 2006
Democrat Martin O'Malley portrayed Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. yesterday as a pro-sprawl governor who has slashed the budget and staff of Maryland's park system while failing to preserve much open space. During a news conference at North Point State Park in Baltimore County, O'Malley said that as governor his goal would be to protect 150,000 acres of land from development, more than twice the acreage preserved by Ehrlich over his four years in office. "There has been a sad playbook that has been followed in our National Park Service for the last six years - reducing park rangers, jacking up fees and not taking care of our national parks," O'Malley said.
NEWS
August 10, 1995
This country's national parks remain hallowed ground for most Americans, even as the number of sites managed by the National Park Service has soared to nearly 370.From the initial effort to preserve the unique majesty of Yellowstone 125 years ago, the national parks system has mushroomed to include seashores and highways, historic houses and memorials, the White House, battlefields and cemeteries.It's a vast empire of 80 million acres, with a $1.6 billion budget that is still inadequate to fund needed upkeep and new additions.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 23, 2012
Baltimore's historic park system ranks 15th among the nation's 40 largest cities in a new rating released Wednesday, which credits the city's foresight in carving out public spaces over the past two centuries but faults its more recent leadership for not maintaining that investment. The nonprofit Trust for Public Land gave Baltimore's 4,900 acres of parks three out of a possible five "park benches," or stars, in its ParkScore rating system. The city got high marks for the accessibility of its parks, with 85 percent of residents able to reach one within a 10-minute walk.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
Few historical figures are deserving of greater public recognition and tribute than Maryland's own Harriet Tubman. Although typically mentioned in history books as a conductor of the Underground Railroad, the many accomplishments over her long life — and her connection to her native state — are not widely known or adequately appreciated. That's why Congress should move forward with a proposal to create a national park in her name on the Eastern Shore. It is a rare opportunity to right a historical wrong — to set aside the land where Ms. Tubman was born and raised and toiled as a slave so that future generations might walk in her footsteps and develop a deeper understanding of this remarkable woman.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
The Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland was listed Wednesday by a pair of environmental groups as one of the 25 U.S. National Park Service properties most threatened by the effects of climate change driven by human activity. Stronger coastal storms and predicted sea-level increases of several feet by the end of this century are "virtually certain" to produce breaches and fragmentation of the island, along with losses of habitat for its animal and plant species, according to the report by the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | May 25, 2008
The paths from the overlook to the water's edge at McKeldin Rapids are steep, slippery and stitched with tree roots. When it rains, the trails create a sluice of brown ooze that fouls the largest whitewater rapid on the Patapsco River and the fishing hole it empties into. "The rapids are a major attraction. Everyone who comes to the McKeldin Area wants to see them," says Amy Lutsko, a ranger at Patapsco Valley State Park, where the rapids are located. "But it's very nasty, not very safe, not the best of situations."
NEWS
By William L. Withuhn | March 2, 2007
President Theodore Roosevelt said, "The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation increased, and not impaired in value." We have not behaved well as a nation with respect to some of our most treasured resources - our national parks. Decades of neglect have taken a heavy toll on them. However, thanks to the leadership of Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne and the Bush administration's recently announced National Parks Centennial Initiative - and with the faithful support of park champions in Congress, including Maryland's congressional delegation and thousands of national park visitors and advocates - we have an opportunity to remedy the situation.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | October 13, 2006
Democrat Martin O'Malley portrayed Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. yesterday as a pro-sprawl governor who has slashed the budget and staff of Maryland's park system while failing to preserve much open space. During a news conference at North Point State Park in Baltimore County, O'Malley said that as governor his goal would be to protect 150,000 acres of land from development, more than twice the acreage preserved by Ehrlich over his four years in office. "There has been a sad playbook that has been followed in our National Park Service for the last six years - reducing park rangers, jacking up fees and not taking care of our national parks," O'Malley said.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | April 2, 2013
A section of Shamrock Park in Bel Air may end up getting some major upgrades, or at least town officials are talking about the possibility. Some of the early discussion includes installing additional playground equipment, defined pathways and shade trees on either side of the Humbert Amphitheater, and all of these suggestions deserve the full attention of the Board of Town Commissioners. There's good reason to want to keep Shamrock Park in top shape. It's one of the crown jewels of a top-flight municipal park system in Bel Air. The maintenance of park space is a municipal responsibility on par with keeping streets and sewers up to standard and providing police protection.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,sun reporter | September 21, 2006
Mayor Martin O'Malley's plan to add a significant swath of open space to Baltimore's park system hit a snag yesterday as Comptroller Joan M. Pratt questioned the $6.2 million plan and its political motivations. O'Malley had wanted the city's five-member spending board to vote yesterday on leasing 48 acres of University of Baltimore land in Mount Washington, a plan that he unveiled Monday and that dovetailed with his gubernatorial campaign's strategy this week to focus on the environment.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.