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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | April 25, 1995
Patapsco Valley State Park officials are inviting area residents to help the park and themselves this weekend at the second annual Outdoor Adventures Expo.Noting renewed emphasis on the need to exercise more and vigorously, park officials are encouraging residents to explore facilities at the 15,000-acre state park. The recreational area spreads through Carroll, Howard, Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties."The expo is really a way for us to educate the public about the park and to get them to learn how to use it," said Offutt Johnson, a park naturalist.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun, and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
A parking valet saved the wedding day of a Fells Point couple this week when he officiated their ceremony after snow shut down the courthouse.  Megan Peterson, 29,  and Tim Christofield, 33, had planned to get married at the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court in Annapolis on Tuesday, but the courthouse, like most places, was shut down because of the area's heaviest snow of the season.  The couple had been planning the wedding for months, and...
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NEWS
By Michael Martinez and Michael Martinez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2007
NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK, Wash. -- Global warming is altering the identity of national parks in the West, especially the Pacific Northwest, where the iconic string of glacier-capped mountains inexorably shrinks from the horizon, park officials warn. The melting ice caps in Washington state, home to more glaciers than anywhere else in the lower 48, are providing one of the most visual accountings of global warming outside Alaska and the Arctic, enhanced by federal officials' digital archiving last year of photos of park glaciers taken 50 years ago. The changes over the decades are threatening the aesthetics and ecosystems of parks such as North Cascades, imperiling the country's natural heritage, park officials and conservationists said.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | July 15, 2012
When Jonathan Schuchman arrived at Westminster City Park on July 9, he knew it would be fun. "We got to bring all the balls down and play whatever we wanted to play," said the 12-year-old counselor-in-training for the City of Westminster's Department of Recreation and Parks. "I come all summer," he said. That's music to the ears of Robin Cherney, a program specialist for the city's rec department - though in truth, she wants even more. Cherney said she has the goal to keep kids moving all year long, and to that end, she created the program Rec on the Move, last September.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1999
Some residents of Daniels Road in Ellicott City are complaining about homosexual activity in the Daniels portion of the Patapsco Valley State Park, which has gained a reputation over the years as a gathering spot for gay men. But park spokesmen and Howard County police deny there's a problem."
NEWS
By Megan Hartley and Megan Hartley,Capital News Service | January 28, 2007
ANNAPOLIS -- It was below freezing Friday morning on a sunny little peninsula in Harness Creek. A man bundled up in a scarf and hat walking his two young yellow Labradors was one of the few souls to brave the blustery trails of Quiet Waters Park. But the cold did not deter park rangers and maintenance workers, who arrived armed with power drills in a fleet of white pickup trucks, to dismantle a fairy-tale sculpture that Anne Arundel County park officials had deemed a safety hazard. The sculptor, Al Zaruba, said he was "emotionally beaten up" over the destruction of his work, titled The Sky Below, Earth Above - or "the treehouse," as park workers nicknamed it. After all, he had not even had a chance to finish it. "The piece never looked as beautiful as I wanted it to because it was still in the beginning stages.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1994
After six years near Route 108 in Clarksville, a 19th-century schoolhouse could find a permanent home in Elkridge.The county Recreation and Parks Department hopes to move the Pfeiffer Corner Schoolhouse from the edge of the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area to Rockburn Branch Park, the site of three other historical structures.The school would become "more of a destination" by being placed in the 400-acre park, said senior park planner Clara Gouin.Park officials aim to move the school by 1996.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
A new nonprofit group is raising thousands of dollars in an effort to improve and repair Patapsco Valley State Park.Members of The Friends of Patapsco Valley State Park foundation will help park officials meet public needs where regular budget shortfalls were reducing services and improvements, said James Palmer, president.The foundation received formal certification as a tax-exempt organization last month, allowing it to become an official fund-raising vehicle for the park, which hugs the river in Carroll, Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Liz Atwood and Dan Thanh Dang and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
A week after signing its first tenant, the UMBC Research Park has been dealt a setback by a Maryland appeals court, which ruled yesterday that Baltimore County erred in approving the project's development plan.The Maryland Court of Special Appeals, the state's second-highest, agreed with park opponents that the county zoning commissioner erred when he refused to consider the park's impact beyond the limits of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County campus.The court ordered a new hearing to determine what impact the project will have on the neighborhood around the $50 million park.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
A new nonprofit group is raising thousands of dollars in an effort to improve and repair Patapsco Valley State Park.Members of The Friends of Patapsco Valley State Park foundation will help park officials meet public needs where regular budget shortfalls were reducing services and improvements, said James Palmer, president.The foundation received formal certification as a tax-exempt organization last month, allowing it to become an official fund-raising vehicle for the park, which hugs the river in Carroll, Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2011
Without drama or jellyfish, summer appeared to be winding down Sunday at Rocky Point Beach and Park. Lifeguard chairs soon go into storage as the 2011 swimming season ends at the popular, 375-acre Essex public park. Today ends lifeguard service at most public beaches throughout the state, which offered a respite during brutal heat earlier in the season. "This was a year when we were busier early in the summer," said Rocky Point manager Michael Sapp, a summer Baltimore County Recreation and Parks employee who also works as an elementary schoolteacher at Holabird Middle School in Dundalk.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
It staggers the imagination to think that a little more than 20 years ago, the idea of saving a pristine neck of land on the South River and remaking it into a showplace public park would have been controversial. Now, two decades after Quiet Waters Park made its debut, the proof is that it attracts 700,000 visitors a year. The claims that it would bring noisy crowds, harm the environment and be too extravagant have evaporated. It's established itself as a beloved haven of sanctuary and sanity for its patrons, who praise its paths, forested groves, tucked-away gardens and water views.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
Richard Holley, a retired city middle school principal who became an advocate for Frederick Douglass High School, died of cancer April 19 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 74 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Sandtown neighborhood of West Baltimore, he attended the Coppin Demonstration School and Booker T. Washington Junior High and was a 1953 graduate of Douglass High School. He earned a degree in Spanish from Morgan State College and his master's degree from Towson University.
TRAVEL
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 2, 2010
You can tell spring is here. The roller coasters at Hersheypark are getting ready to rumble. "During the winter, the temperatures are too cold - for most roller coasters, it must be above 32 degrees for them to operate," says Kathy Burrows, the park's public relations manager. "If the tracks aren't warm enough, they just won't go." Thank goodness it's supposed to be plenty warm enough this weekend for Hershey's annual "Springtime In the Park" celebration. Even though the season's grand opening won't be until May 1, visitors over the next two weekends (except for April 9)
NEWS
By Sharahn D. Boykin and Sharahn D. Boykin,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
Sherman Offer was taking his daily walk around his Annapolis apartment building one day when the pavement opened and swallowed his leg. The hole that Offer, 66, encountered 2 1/2 years ago was about the size of a basketball. It has grown into a giant sinkhole, slowly eating nearly 40 parking spaces at the Glenwood high-rise for senior citizens -- an inconvenience for residents, an eyesore for the community and a source of frustration for the federally funded agency that manages the building.
NEWS
By Michael Martinez and Michael Martinez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2007
NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK, Wash. -- Global warming is altering the identity of national parks in the West, especially the Pacific Northwest, where the iconic string of glacier-capped mountains inexorably shrinks from the horizon, park officials warn. The melting ice caps in Washington state, home to more glaciers than anywhere else in the lower 48, are providing one of the most visual accountings of global warming outside Alaska and the Arctic, enhanced by federal officials' digital archiving last year of photos of park glaciers taken 50 years ago. The changes over the decades are threatening the aesthetics and ecosystems of parks such as North Cascades, imperiling the country's natural heritage, park officials and conservationists said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 1996
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. -- In the 1880s, after the herds of bison that once swarmed over the Western plains had been hunted to the brink of extinction, a few hundred of the animals were found living in the mountains of this national park.The Army stepped up patrols against poachers, and park authorities created a ranch in the park to raise bison. The restoration project was so successful that it became a symbol for the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service, which have an image of a buffalo on their badges.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
After two years of waiting for funds, the Warfield's Pond Community Park in Glenwood received nearly $800,000 yesterday to develop about 9 acres into recreational facilities from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.The money will be used by the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks to create tennis, basketball and volleyball courts, a fishing pier, two shelters, horseshoe pits, a playground and pathways and boardwalks around the pond, plus roads and a parking area.The money is one of the largest amounts provided by the DNR's Program Open Space, which buys land with the state's real estate transfer tax, said DNR spokeswoman LeeAna Salaverria.
NEWS
By Megan Hartley and Megan Hartley,Capital News Service | January 28, 2007
ANNAPOLIS -- It was below freezing Friday morning on a sunny little peninsula in Harness Creek. A man bundled up in a scarf and hat walking his two young yellow Labradors was one of the few souls to brave the blustery trails of Quiet Waters Park. But the cold did not deter park rangers and maintenance workers, who arrived armed with power drills in a fleet of white pickup trucks, to dismantle a fairy-tale sculpture that Anne Arundel County park officials had deemed a safety hazard. The sculptor, Al Zaruba, said he was "emotionally beaten up" over the destruction of his work, titled The Sky Below, Earth Above - or "the treehouse," as park workers nicknamed it. After all, he had not even had a chance to finish it. "The piece never looked as beautiful as I wanted it to because it was still in the beginning stages.
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