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NEWS
By James H. Bready | September 27, 1992
Janis Rettaliata and her camera are a familiar sight, i Baltimore and beyond, when something is being constructed. That can be a building -- or a sports team's victory. One day in 1989, the two came together. She thought: the Baltimore Orioles' new home -- pictures of it taking form, shot from all angles in all weathers. What a story!Three years, 200 or more trips to Oriole Park at Camden Yards and about 600 rolls of 35mm color film later, the structure sometimes called OPACY was open for American League business.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Ernest L. Caldwell Jr., a retired senior city planner and urban designer who did early studies for what became Oriole Park at Camden Yards , died of complications of Parkinson's disease July 8 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Stoneleigh resident was 74. Colleagues said Mr. Caldwell, a longtime baseball fan, had an early and influential role in convincing city officials of the potential of the former Baltimore & Ohio Railroad property adjacent to Camden Station as the site of a new sports field.
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SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 2, 1995
What makes perfect baseball sense -- which means it probably won't be done -- is to change the nondescript name of Oriole Park at Camden Yards to Ripken-Ruth Field or Ripken-Ruth Park, whichever you prefer.It would be a million-dollar promotional idea for the city of Baltimore and the Orioles to take advantage of the opportunity to put a worthy name, belated or not, on the 3-year-old facility. What's a better choice than Ruth, the greatest gift Baltimore gave to the sports world, and Ripken, born in Havre de Grace and raised in Aberdeen, who is about to establish himself as the game's new Iron Man?
NEWS
June 29, 2010
Last week's ruling by Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Ronald A. Silkworth tossing out a voter referendum on the zoning ordinance allowing slots at Arundel Mills mall was an unexpected twist in the convoluted path Maryland has taken toward legalized slot machines. But what's most surprising of all is that it might just stand up on appeal. That's because the decision hinges on provisions of the state constitution and county charter that expressly forbid appropriation bills from being put to voter referendum.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | March 22, 1992
You'll see it in the red brick walls and arches that surround the playing field.You'll see it in the Camden Green logo of the 1890s Baltimore Baseball Club, emblazoned at the end of each row of seats.You'll see it in the vintage scoreboard, with its scrollwork and oriole weather vanes -- and beyond, in the picture-postcard view of the downtown skyline.The link between the two forces that forged Oriole Park at Camden Yards is evident everywhere:Baseball and Baltimore.In 15 days, after nearly a decade of planning and construction, the two will become one. That's when the cast-iron gates will officially open to let in the people who will make the city's field of dreams come alive.
NEWS
By Mark Hyman Michael Ollove of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | October 4, 1991
For three years, it has been the downtown ballpark or the unnamed ballpark at Camden Yards or, as the controversy bloomed in recent months, the ballpark that might never have a name.Now, there is only one name for the future home field of the Baltimore Orioles, though it comes in two parts -- Oriole Park at Camden Yards.Four months after he began talks about the name with Orioles principal owner Eli S. Jacobs, Gov. William Donald Schaefer finally revealed their choice during his weekly radio program on WBAL yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | April 4, 1992
Roy Sommerhof, the Orioles' chief stadium trouble-shooter, was describing the "nightmare scenario," an Opening Day in which the scoreboard would blacken, the turnstiles wouldn't turn and fans would be angered.Moments later, just as the Orioles' Chris Hoiles was knocking in two runs with a shot between the third baseman's legs, the scoreboard went black. Down on the concourse, the televisions flickered off, drawing an angry moan from the fans.All systems were back up and running a minute later, and the fans were back to their new-found love affair with Baltimore's new ballpark.
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 2006
Only 23 hours separated the end of Monday's game against the Baltimore Orioles and the start of the next one in Minnesota against the Twins. The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim were scrambling to get dressed, eat dinner, pack their travel bags and make the team's bus, scheduled to leave Oriole Park at Camden Yards at 10:15 p.m. And Fred Tyler was in the middle of all of it. The Arnold resident has been the visiting clubhouse manager for the Orioles since...
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Bill Ordine and Childs Walker and Bill Ordine,Sun reporters | April 8, 2007
When Camden Yards hosted its first home opener 15 years ago, many already regarded it as a triumph for Baltimore and the Orioles. "Field of Dreams Comes True in Baltimore," gushed the headline in The New York Times. Less obvious was that the park - with its brick exterior, exposed metalwork, city backdrop and incorporation of existing architecture - would become the template for a generation of baseball stadiums. Today, with a more modern park featuring concrete and glass rising up along the Anacostia waterfront in Washington, that wave might be over.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | August 7, 1998
The red brick walls are there. So are the arched gateways and wide concourses that offer sweeping views of the city.But the real story of the Baltimore Ravens' $220 million football stadium is not how much it has in common with its acclaimed green cousin to the north, Oriole Park at Camden Yards. It's how different the two turned out to be -- in size, scale and character.Although there is a certain resemblance between the two structures, visitors will discover, starting with tomorrow's preseason opener, that the Ravens' home is a bird of a different feather.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Ed.gunts@baltsun.com | August 29, 2009
A Marylander who helped shape Oriole Park at Camden Yards and later guided the preservation and expansion of Boston's Fenway Park is looking for a new challenge. Roland Park resident Janet Marie Smith stepped down this summer as senior vice president in charge of planning and development for the Boston Red Sox, a position she has held for the past eight years. Smith said she left the Red Sox last month because her work in Boston was winding down and, after commuting between Baltimore and New England on a weekly basis for years, she is looking for planning opportunities closer to home.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 2, 2009
Thomas A. Gorman III, a mechanical contractor whose work included Oriole Park at Camden Yards, died Tuesday of complications from surgery at the Brightwood Rehabilitation Center. The Timonium resident was 80. Born in Johnstown, Pa., he lost his left arm in a high school bus accident at 16. He attended the University of Pittsburgh and then the Johns Hopkins University after moving to Baltimore in the early 1950s to work as a draftsman and project manager for the Lloyd E. Mitchell Co. In 1964, he founded his own business, T.A. Gorman Inc., in Towson.
NEWS
By Photos by Gene Sweeney Jr. and Photos by Gene Sweeney Jr.,Sun photographer | April 9, 2007
Amonth before opening day, activity picked up at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, as the grounds crew got the grass and base paths ready for the season. Lines were painted, seating was refurbished and the field was prepared for the Orioles' 15th year at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Bill Ordine and Childs Walker and Bill Ordine,Sun reporters | April 8, 2007
When Camden Yards hosted its first home opener 15 years ago, many already regarded it as a triumph for Baltimore and the Orioles. "Field of Dreams Comes True in Baltimore," gushed the headline in The New York Times. Less obvious was that the park - with its brick exterior, exposed metalwork, city backdrop and incorporation of existing architecture - would become the template for a generation of baseball stadiums. Today, with a more modern park featuring concrete and glass rising up along the Anacostia waterfront in Washington, that wave might be over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ASHLIE BAYLOR] | March 22, 2007
Conquer the stadiums The lowdown -- Health buff or not, run, walk or jog Saturday as the American Lung Association of Maryland hosts the Baltimore Stadium Trek: From the O-Zone to the End Zone. Starting at Oriole Park, participants will run or walk to the top of the stands and back, then go to nearby M&T Bank Stadium and do the same thing there. A Celebration Tailgate follows the Trek. The pledge-based event will raise money for the association. If you go -- Registration is 8 a.m.-9 a.m. The trek starts at 9:30 a.m. at the entrance of the Oriole Park at Camden Yards, 333 W. Camden St. The registration fee is $25. Call 410-560-2120 or go to marylandlung.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun Reporter | February 16, 2007
Ravens fans, still smarting from last month's playoff loss to the Super Bowl champion Indianapolis Colts, probably can't wait for next football season to begin. But for some folks, it may be starting just one weekend too soon. A preseason scrimmage in early August apparently sacked Baltimore's chance to land a date on the reunion concert tour of the rock group the Police. An event promoter called the Ravens offering to broker an agreement between the rock group and the team for use of M&T Bank Stadium, a club official confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
March 29, 1992
The grass at Oriole Park at Camden Yards is Maryland Bluegrass sod, grown in Salisbury.
FEATURES
May 18, 1994
Amoco's LaserfestOriole Park at Camden Yards. A laser shows follows the Orioles-Red Sox game. Orioles game tickets required.
NEWS
September 17, 2006
William Beverly Campbell, a former Gilman School teacher, administrator and coach, died of a heart attack Sunday while playing tennis near his home in Sunriver, Ore. The former Roland Park resident was 72. Born in Baltimore and raised in Towson, he was the son of Bruce Spotswood Campbell and Virginia MacLean Tyler Campbell, owners of the Harry T. Campbell materials supply quarry in Baltimore County. A 1952 Gilman School graduate, Mr. Campbell earned a bachelor's degree in economics at Princeton University, where he was a four-year All-American lacrosse goalie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH MARSTON | July 6, 2006
CHRISTIAN FESTIVAL The Billy Graham Evangelistic Association will hold the Metro Maryland Festival tomorrow through Sunday at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. The event includes music by American Idol finalist George Huff, Andrae Crouch and Randy Travis, as well as speeches from Franklin Graham, Billy Graham's son. Billy Graham will also speak, health permitting. Saturday morning features KidzFest. ....................... The festival events are at 7 p.m. tomorrow, 7 p.m. Saturday and 4 p.m. Sunday . KidzFest will be at 10 a.m. Saturday.
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