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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
Froggy is back -- this time on parole.The "gangster" version of the folk tale "Froggy Went A-Courtin' " is no longer banned from Baltimore County elementary school libraries but will be accessible only to parents and teachers to read with children.School Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione accepted a recommendation Friday to overturn the ban on children's author Kevin O'Malley's satirical version of the Froggy story, which ends with the amphibian in a cell wearing prison stripes.The recommendation, from Phyllis Bailey, associate superintendent for educational support services, includes changing the procedure for reviewing books that are the subject complaints.
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NEWS
February 11, 1997
John and Joseph Verde of Gambrills are finalists in the 15th Annual Duracell/National Science Teachers Association Scholarship Competition.The brothers, who attend Arundel High School, invented battery-powered devices, two of 100 inventions that will be submitted for final judging.John, a senior, invented "Jar-O-Matic." Joseph, a sophomore, invented "Temp-Safe."Forty-one first- through fourth-place winners will be named in early April. All 100 finalists are eligible to win at least a $100 savings bond and compete for the first prize of a $20,000 savings bond and for five second-place $10,000 bonds.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | January 14, 2007
Newborns begin life as natural poets, loving the sound of their own gurgles and coos. And, with the encouragement of parents and teachers, children can continue to write and enjoy poetry into their high school years and beyond. A group of elementary students in Detroit, Mich., wrote poetry on the subject of what seashells might say if they could speak to us. I was especially charmed by Tatiana Ziglar's short poem, which alludes to the way in which poets learn to be attentive to the world.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
They want their elementary school children to have books in their libraries and middle schoolers not to be afraid as they walk to and from school. They believe that high schoolers shouldn't have to learn with 50 students in a classroom.It seems so little, but for years parents and teachers in Baltimore haven't asked for much and have expected even less.Yesterday, 90 parents, teachers and neighbors from Southeast Baltimore who met at a local church were like many others dissatisfied with the state of the city's schools, except for one crucial distinction: They say they're going to do something about it.With few grass-roots community and parent groups pushing for better schools, the efforts of the Southeast Education Task Force are unusual.
NEWS
February 28, 1991
J. Russell Gilbert, 83, a retired personnel administrator for the Western Electric Co. Inc., died Sunday of cancer at a nursing home in Gettysburg, Pa.Funeral services were being held today at St. Stephen Lutheran Church, Wilkens Avenue and Courtney Road.Mr. Gilbert, who lived in Arbutus, continued to work part time after his retirement in 1972 after 40 years of service at Western Electric's Point Breeze plant.A member since 1954 of the Telephone Pioneers of America, which has a program for the deaf, he became active as a volunteer for the Infant Hearing Assessment Program at the University of Maryland Medical School.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | June 19, 1993
After months of silence about the controversy surrounding school Superintendent Stuart Berger, Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden stepped into the fight yesterday as peacemaker.Mr. Hayden, a former school board president, called for a public meeting next week at which teachers, parents, school board members and administrators can discuss their differences. Another former school board president, Donald Pearce, who appeared with Mr. Hayden, will chair the meeting, the executive said.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 1996
RIVER HILL Raptors emerged undefeated this summer in their division of the Columbia Neighborhood Swim League. Formed only last year in Columbia's newest village, the team includes 184 youngsters ages 5 to 18. They defeated teams from Harper's Choice, Clemens Crossing, Clary's Forest/Hawthorn, Dorsey's Search and Huntington."
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
Baltimore County school officials are taking a new approach to setting school attendance boundaries, and parents and other community members in the Woodlawn area have gladly consented to be the guinea pigs. For the first time, parents, teachers and others have joined to decide boundaries for Dogwood Elementary School, which will open in the fall. The school is being built to relieve crowding at Chadwick, Powhatan and Winfield elementary schools, which are in an area dense with apartment complexes and dotted with new housing developments.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | March 3, 2006
Stressed-out Girls: Helping Them Thrive in the Age of Pressure By Roni Cohen-Sandler Viking/$24.95 It's no piece of cake being a young girl in today's competitive world. This book, published last year, paints a troubling picture of the pressures adolescent girls face. Even to an adult the list is exhausting: Acceptance to the "right" school, excelling at sports and academics, performing well on the SATs, getting into the "right" college. Cohen-Sandler is clinical psychologist and author of I'm Not Mad, I Just Hate You!
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