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By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
In the wake of an April school board decision to eliminate eight half-days of teacher planning time, parents and teachers union officials will meet in an effort to carve out time for planning during the school day.Parents and teachers plan to find a solution to the problem at the meeting, said Jean R. Thomas, president of the Harford County Education Association. School board members have been invited to attend.Kathy Carmello, who originated the idea of forming the committee, said parents want teachers to know they have not been forgotten.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
Howard County Board of Education candidate Robert Ballinger has been a fixture at this year's county fair. He has been gathering ideas from county residents on what they believe works in the school system and what could be changed. He has discovered that people don't mind taking a break from the shows, auctions and food lines to offer their opinions. "They talk about individual issues with the schools. They think that teachers in the classroom, knowing the students and knowing the involvement of the families, should have more leeway," said Ballinger, who lives in the Dorsey Hall community in Ellicott City.
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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2000
This year, pupils at a middle school in Ellicott City have a midday class on the stage in the cafeteria - the last possible space that the principal could find to squeeze them in. Never mind the din from the lunchroom or the smell of taco salad wafting in. Some Howard County high schools have one-way hallways and stairwells to control the throbbing stampedes that are released each time a bell rings. "You have to literally put your fists up and shove your way through," said Mount Hebron High School junior Rebecca Schwartz, 16. "Some of the seniors enjoy mooing while they're doing it, pretending they're cattle."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | January 12, 2010
Opponents of a Baltimore County student tracking system that was to be made mandatory this month are expected to continue voicing their concerns at the county school board meeting tonight. The tracking system, which would require teachers to grade students on their mastery of about 100 skills in each subject, has angered teachers, who say it is burdensome and redundant. Superintendent Joe A. Hairston pulled back from an order to make the system mandatory by the end of the second marking period, but opposition to the program has continued to build.
NEWS
By Scott Carlson and Scott Carlson,[Special to The Sun ] | September 3, 2006
IAN CHISHOLM, A fourth- and fifth-grade teacher at Chatsworth School in Reisterstown, remembers one of the first conflicts he had with a parent, many years ago, when he was new to the profession. He had been covering the topic of evolution one week, when he got a visit from a mother of a child in his class. She was livid. Evolution contradicted the Bible lessons she gave her son at home, and the boy felt confused and caught between the two of them. Despite being a young teacher, Chisholm responded in a way experts would say was wise: He sat and listened.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Orioles baseball veteran Pat Kelly and representatives from local law enforcement agencies will make presentations to the Westminster Elementary "Just Say No" club Friday.This is the school's first club program for fifth-graders this year.In other drug-prevention news, East Middle will play host to a Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Seminar for the community, parents and teachers at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 15.
NEWS
March 14, 1995
In East Baltimore, 200 children are enrolled in the Oliver Community School-Based Asthma Program, a pilot project that educates children, parents and teachers -- and even sends health workers into homes to fight conditions that worsen asthma.Of those children, one-quarter used to go to the emergency room at least once during a six-month period. That has been cut to 5 percent over six months, said the asthma project's director, Dr. Peyton Eggleston of Johns Hopkins University Hospital.Article on Page 1E
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 17, 2001
How do families arm themselves for the homework drill? Some schools - check with yours - run homework hot lines that parents and students can call to get assignment information. There's help on the Internet, too. Here are some Web sites where children can get help with their homework and others that offer parents tips on handling homework. For Students www.about.com - Links to topics ranging from the arts to social studies. www.studyweb.com - Online calculators, dictionaries, quizzes and links to information from economics to world history.
NEWS
April 10, 1992
Parents of Middle River Middle School students, angered by furloughs and budget cuts, staged a protest outside the school yesterday afternoon.Protests and demonstrations have become commonplace throughout Baltimore County in the past few weeks as parents, teachers and students seek to convey their unhappiness over how state and county fiscal policy is affecting education.Teachers from Hillcrest Elementary School in Catonsville, who demonstrated earlier this week, staged protests yesterday as well.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | May 15, 1991
Marilyn Turcotte was a little nervous about leaving her car parked at the Harman Elementary School, but she didn't have much choice when told space was limited at the campground where she was to accompany second-graders on an overnight trip.The bad news for Turcotte and 13 other parents and teachers came just after breakfast yesterday, when they were summoned to a tent and told their cars had been vandalized. Turcotte's 1989 Nissan Sentra was set afire and gutted."I planned on driving down," Turcotte said yesterday while standing in the school parking lot near where her car had been parked.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | June 8, 2008
When River Hill High School 10th-grader Kelsey Balimtas sits down to do her homework, her cell phone and computer are always right in front of her. She would like to stay completely focused on the textbook, but honestly, she says, she just can't. Her cell phone calls to her with an irresistible buzz she can't ignore. She bounces from homework to text message to Facebook and back to homework. "I think the quality of my homework is decreased," she admitted. And so do college professors and high school teachers, who say this constantly plugged-in generation is less able to focus on subjects that take deep concentration.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | January 14, 2007
Newborns begin life as natural poets, loving the sound of their own gurgles and coos. And, with the encouragement of parents and teachers, children can continue to write and enjoy poetry into their high school years and beyond. A group of elementary students in Detroit, Mich., wrote poetry on the subject of what seashells might say if they could speak to us. I was especially charmed by Tatiana Ziglar's short poem, which alludes to the way in which poets learn to be attentive to the world.
NEWS
By Scott Carlson and Scott Carlson,[Special to The Sun ] | September 3, 2006
IAN CHISHOLM, A fourth- and fifth-grade teacher at Chatsworth School in Reisterstown, remembers one of the first conflicts he had with a parent, many years ago, when he was new to the profession. He had been covering the topic of evolution one week, when he got a visit from a mother of a child in his class. She was livid. Evolution contradicted the Bible lessons she gave her son at home, and the boy felt confused and caught between the two of them. Despite being a young teacher, Chisholm responded in a way experts would say was wise: He sat and listened.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | March 3, 2006
Stressed-out Girls: Helping Them Thrive in the Age of Pressure By Roni Cohen-Sandler Viking/$24.95 It's no piece of cake being a young girl in today's competitive world. This book, published last year, paints a troubling picture of the pressures adolescent girls face. Even to an adult the list is exhausting: Acceptance to the "right" school, excelling at sports and academics, performing well on the SATs, getting into the "right" college. Cohen-Sandler is clinical psychologist and author of I'm Not Mad, I Just Hate You!
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | February 20, 2005
MEL LEVINE has been a pediatrician for more than 30 years, and in that time he has watched some of his toddlers take their first, unsteady steps into adulthood. Not only are these children remarkably unprepared to be grown-ups, he has concluded, but their parents and teachers have actually made it more difficult. In his new book Ready or Not, Here Life Comes (Simon & Schuster, $26), he paints a picture of these unfocused, unsettled and ill-equipped twentysomethings wandering aimlessly on the employment landscape.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
Howard County's NAACP chapter says racism is flavoring the emotional furor among white parents and staff at Centennial High School over the county school board's decision clearing two black school administrators of unethical behavior. In a two-page, paid advertisement in Patuxent Publishing newspapers yesterday, local NAACP President Jenkins Odoms Jr., attributed the parents' and teachers' anger to "an underlying core of racism in Howard County, which has become embedded in the culture of some of our schools.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
Froggy is back -- this time on parole.The "gangster" version of the folk tale "Froggy Went A-Courtin' " is no longer banned from Baltimore County elementary school libraries but will be accessible only to parents and teachers to read with children.School Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione accepted a recommendation Friday to overturn the ban on children's author Kevin O'Malley's satirical version of the Froggy story, which ends with the amphibian in a cell wearing prison stripes.The recommendation, from Phyllis Bailey, associate superintendent for educational support services, includes changing the procedure for reviewing books that are the subject complaints.
NEWS
February 11, 1997
John and Joseph Verde of Gambrills are finalists in the 15th Annual Duracell/National Science Teachers Association Scholarship Competition.The brothers, who attend Arundel High School, invented battery-powered devices, two of 100 inventions that will be submitted for final judging.John, a senior, invented "Jar-O-Matic." Joseph, a sophomore, invented "Temp-Safe."Forty-one first- through fourth-place winners will be named in early April. All 100 finalists are eligible to win at least a $100 savings bond and compete for the first prize of a $20,000 savings bond and for five second-place $10,000 bonds.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2004
A stroll along the colorful halls of Hammond Elementary School reveals no evidence of the power struggle that threatens to turn neighbors against one another and teachers against parents. "It's become divisive in the community," said Nancy Trudel, a parent who has heard rumblings of the unrest, but is unsure of its origin or basis. Tucked away in a back room last week at the North Laurel school, a group of 11 educators detailed what they say is harassment by a small group of parents they contend can't separate fact from fiction.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2004
A teacher who alleged that ousted Annapolis High School principal Deborah Williams tried to run her vehicle off the road last week withdrew her request for a restraining order in court yesterday. An attorney for Spanish teacher Milagros M. Cancel declined to comment on why her client dropped her civil complaint against Williams, who was forced out of her job last week for unrelated reasons. Outside court yesterday, Williams declined to comment about the case. She hugged friends and was met with applause from about 30 supporters who attended the brief morning hearing.
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