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By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | February 17, 1991
Criticism of proposed rules to govern fund raising in county schoolscame loud and clear from about 20 county residents at a public hearing Thursday.A ban on door-to-door sales and on individual prizes for top sales took the heaviest fire. But speakers also told the school board they saw increased red tape and loss of individual school autonomy in the proposed policy.The draft policy is the county school system's first effort to put formal regulations on fund raising. Its rules govern how individualschool organizations can raise money and how it can be spent.
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NEWS
By a Sun staff writer | May 7, 2014
Hereford High School parents who are upset about plans to change the school schedule throughout the county next year have filed a complaint in Circuit Court, seeking a temporary restraining order. The parents had filed a legal petition with the Baltimore County school board last month, requesting to keep the school's current schedule. They said in a press release Wednesday that they are seeking the restraining order because the school board has not overturned Superintendent Dallas Dance's decision and because classes are currently being scheduled for next year.
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NEWS
August 28, 1991
Area schools are preparing for the 1991-1992 academic year with orientation programs for parents and students.* Sandymount ElementarySchool students in grades one through five and their parents had orientation at the temporary school facility, 224 N. Center St., Westminster, yesterday.The program gave parents and students the opportunity to tourthe facility and learn school procedures.* North Middle School has scheduled an orientation to the building and programs at 7 p.m. today in the South Gym.In other school news:* June Dayhoff, a teacher at New Windsor Middle School, was awarded a Fellows Scholarshipfrom Indiana University of Pennsylvania to attend a training sessionentitled "Children of Alcoholics and Dysfunctional Families."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Hereford High School parents and students packed the Baltimore County school board meeting Tuesday night to protest the change in high school schedules. Carrying signs that said "No Voice, No Choice," the students said they didn't want to change their schedules to take double the number of classes in a semester. Currently, Hereford students have four subjects taken each day in periods that are about 90 minutes long. The students then take four different subjects the next semester, for a total of eight classes in a year.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Young children begin each school year full of wonder and eager to learn. They have a natural curiosity and an unending supply of questions. "Do fish fly?" "Why is the ocean blue?" In the past, questions like these may have been given a cursory response or even dismissed in the rush of the busy school day. With today's technology, however, teachers can direct students to sources that will quickly expand their knowledge and feed their appetite to learn.Search toolsThese web guides are uncomplicated, have easy-to-follow directions and search within a limited range of appropriate sites:* www.yahooligans.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
A young, boyish-looking man stood outside the cafeteria at Mount View Middle School on Wednesday night, greeting more than a dozen parents and students. Next to him was Linda Wise, the former principal of Marriotts Ridge High School, who was promoted this week to be the county school system's assistant superintendent of school administration. "This is our new principal, Pat Saunderson," Wise told parents and students. They had come to the middle school for a meeting on the opening of the county's 12th high school in August, but parents and students also got a chance to meet Saunderson for the first time since his appointment to replace Wise.
NEWS
By Donna Boller and Donna Boller,Staff report | March 15, 1992
Merging the School of Technology and Wilde Lake High School is turning out to be a tough sell for School Superintendent Michael E. Hickey.So are several other possibilities -- such as making the vocational-technical school into a countywide polytechnic school -- Hickey outlined for approximately 60 School of Technology parents and students last week."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
A low turnout at a meeting last spring has not deterred parents and students who are trying to start a private, nonprofit club for teen-agers in Carroll County.The group, called CC PRIDES, plans a membership drive and a radiothon from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Aug. 25 at Cranberry Mall. Disc jockey Captain Conners from WYCR in Hanover, Pa., will be there.A Friday night at the mall may be the most logical place for a membership drive: That's where many county teen-agers go on weekends. The mall is co-sponsoring the event with Pizza Hut of Maryland, Random House Inc. and Dean's Restaurant.
NEWS
February 7, 2003
FAFSA is a four-letter word in some households. In others, it's a mystery. As millions of parents and college students know, FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid, the 1040-like form college-bound students must submit to be eligible for financial assistance. Uncle Sam's computers look over the form and determine how much students and their families should be expected to contribute toward paying for college. The rest can be made up through grants, loans and work-study.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media services | June 10, 2007
When Polonius in Shakespeare's play Hamlet said, "Neither a borrower nor a lender be," he was a fortunate man. He did not have a student loan, revolving credit debt, a car loan, a home equity loan or a mortgage. In today's society, young people are weaned early on credit dependency: Credit-card issuers can snare them before high school graduation, stepping up pressure at college orientation. Issuers bet mom and dad will step in with the cash if the student falls too far in the hole. Too often parents and children view approval of a college loan with the same gusto as a college scholarship or money saved for college.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
They have asked a date, found the perfect dress, matched the shoes and made the appointments for hair and nails. But the seniors and their parents at Maryvale Preparatory School must add one more thing to their to-do list before prom night Friday. The all-girls Catholic school in Brooklandville established an unusual pre-prom tradition 26 years ago, when it made an alcohol education program mandatory for students and parents. "Because of all the things going on related to drinking, including a horrific accident, we decided then that we had to do something," said Sister Shawn Marie Maguire, who has overseen the school since 1981.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
It was hard to tell whether his eyes were actually open when Derek Jones shuffled into his dimly lit kitchen at 5:45 a.m., the smell of bacon in the air. The 16-year-old didn't speak, but took directions from his mother who whispered: "I have your coffee made and your breakfast sandwich ready. " Within minutes he had munched on a banana, downed a cup of java, grabbed his egg bagel and backpack and was in the car on his way to the bus stop with his father. By 6:12 a.m. he was boarding the bus, and by 7:17 a.m., whether ready to learn or not, Jones was in his pre-calculus class at South River High School in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 4, 2010
Parents at the Cardinal Gibbons School vowed Thursday to fight its planned closing. Less than 24 hours after the Archdiocese of Baltimore announced it would shut the high school down at the end of the school year, parents had scheduled a rally on the Wilkens Avenue campus for 2 p.m. Saturday and were planning to launch a fundraising campaign to pay a debt of $1.3 million. "We know this will be difficult, but we have to try," said Chris Schene, whose son, Gregory is a junior at the school.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
Parents and students will have a chance to learn how to pursue a college career in music tomorrow at River Hill High School. A two-hour event, "So You Want to Major in Music," is open to all county high school students and their parents. The session, which is to begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held in the school auditorium, is sponsored by the school's music department and the school system's Fine Arts Advisory Council. joe_fischer@hcpss.org. Parent honored State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Nancy S. Grasmick made her way to Mount Hebron High School on Wednesday to honor parent Larry Walker as part of American Education Week activities.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
An independent study has shown that students, parents and teachers back the theories behind the countywide high school reform, but they have little faith in the program's execution. Teachers, parents and students panned the overhaul of Harford County public high schools, called the Comprehensive Secondary School Reform Plan, which introduced longer class periods, required students to take more credits for graduation and called for freshmen to select career pathways, starting in 2006. While some school officials called the widespread discontent a communication issue, others, according to the report, said the reform plan was hastily approved as a "done deal preordained by the central administration," despite objections raised by the affected groups and the lack of research.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | January 3, 2008
This was supposed to be an exciting week at Maritime Industries Academy, with students preparing for a Jan. 9 visit from the secretary of the Navy. Instead, the little Baltimore high school - in a strip mall in the 700 block of W. North Ave. - is in turmoil, railing over the sudden departure of the principal and the assistant principal. Dozens of parents and students marched about 10 blocks to school system headquarters yesterday morning in support of Principal Marco T. Clark, who has resigned, and Assistant Principal Kevin Brooks, who was placed on paid administrative leave.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
The "Baltimore and Beyond" report recommendation for "public charter schools" is not new -- it is the liberal version of the voucher plans advanced 20 years ago -- but it is in consonance with the latest thrust in education reform.Under the "Baltimore and Beyond" proposals, teachers, principals or civic organizations could form their own schools, independent of the local school bureaucracy. The schools would receive a per-pupil payment from state and local governments equal to the average spent in public schools.
NEWS
By HOWARD LIBIT and HOWARD LIBIT,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
Howard County's technology magnet program has stolen the hearts of parents and students and threatens to steal the school system's budget -- a remarkable rush of popularity for a program still in its infancy.But its success is such that the county school board has had to limit enrollment for next year and will use a lottery to decide who will be admitted to the two magnet high schools in the fall -- causing hard feelings among scores of parents and students.Some parents are threatening legal action, saying the board broke its promise to make the program available to anyone who wanted it."
NEWS
September 14, 2007
As another deadline looms next week for students to show proof of immunization or be kept out of class, Baltimore school principals and staff should be making every effort to ensure that parents and students comply with the vaccine requirements. And parents need to stop being a roadblock to their children's education. Required immunizations against chickenpox and hepatitis B reflect growing concerns that these diseases can have serious consequences for children well beyond kindergarten.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | August 28, 2007
In what has become a back-to-school ritual, more than 120 Morgan State University students showed up for the first day of classes yesterday and discovered they were temporarily homeless. Throughout the morning, scores of irate parents and students overwhelmed the residential housing office - which had yet to assign them dormitory rooms. "I'm going to pull him out of here, bottom line," a visibly upset Ron Hargrove said of his son Matthew, a sophomore. "There's no reason why we have to be going through this kind of stuff.
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