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Parental Notification

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By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
An old fight resurfaced yesterday in Annapolis as opposing sides of the abortion debate squared off on a proposal to toughen the state's parental notification law for minors. The bill by Del. Carmen Amedori, a Carroll County Republican, would change current law so that only a judge - not a doctor, as is now allowed - could permit girls to bypass the state's parental notification requirement. "If my kid goes in for oral surgery, I have to be notified," Amedori said as she prepared to testify before the House Health and Government Operations committee hearing on the bill.
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NEWS
May 9, 2013
I write as someone who supports making reproductive choices available to all women, not as one of "those who support 'choice' at all costs," one of many misleading characterizations in Marta Mossburg's recent commentary ("After Gosnell, Md. should rethink late-term abortion," May 8). "Abortion is virtually available on demand throughout a pregnancy," she asserts. Under Maryland law, if the fetus is viable, an abortion may be performed only if "necessary to protect the life or health of the woman or if the fetus is affected by genetic defect or serious deformity or abnormality.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | August 14, 1992
,TC An article in The Sun yesterday incorrectly characterized a provision in the abortion law that Maryland voters will consider in November's referendum. The law contains a provision that doctors notify a teen-ager's parents before her abortion, but it also includes exceptions to that requirement.The Sun regrets the error.While politicians were talking about laws requiring parents to be notified before a teen-ager's abortion, most of the 334 pregnant girls studied in Baltimore were talking to their parents, a Johns Hopkins researcher reports.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | March 19, 2006
RECENT STUDIES ON TEEN pregnancy and abortion invite us to connect the statistical dots. But when we do, we don't get much of a picture. The Guttmacher Institute, a research group that focuses on sexual health and family issues, reports that 33 states have made it more difficult for poor women and teenagers to get reproductive health care. At a time when the public debate on abortion is roaring to new life, it doesn't make much sense to limit a woman's access to information and services that will prevent an unintended pregnancy, but there you have it. In related news, The New York Times reported that its analysis of data shows that laws that require minors to notify their parents or get their permission to have an abortion have not reduced the number of teen abortions, as had been hoped.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
With the new Republican governor providing a backdrop of cautious optimism, about 30 anti-abortion legislators met yesterday in Annapolis to discuss what abortion-related bills they will propose this session. Although those who attended described the meeting largely as a brainstorming session, the lawmakers did agree on some guidelines: They won't push for anything too controversial and instead will concentrate on one or two anti-abortion measures they believe are supported by most Marylanders.
NEWS
November 1, 1992
Voters who want to keep abortion safe and accessible even if the Supreme Court overturns Roe vs. Wade should vote FOR Question 6. Otherwise, Maryland could revert to a 1968 law that restricts abortions to hospitals and requires women to obtain the permission of a hospital review board.Question 6 assures women access to abortion early in pregnancy, but imposes severe restrictions after a fetus has reached viability. It also gives the state a parental notification requirement, along with a bypass procedure required by the Supreme Court.
NEWS
August 17, 1992
After two draft versions and ample opportunity for public comment, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. produced a ballot description of the abortion law Marylanders will vote on in November that is as fair and accurate as a 100-word summary could be. It begins, logically enough, by addressing the main thrust of the legislation. In this case, that means informing voters that the law in question largely continues the status quo on abortion by restricting state interference in the decision.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | September 25, 1992
Several Protestant clergy gathered in Annapolis yesterday to voice their opposition to Maryland's proposed abortion law, saying they have urged parishioners to vote against the measure in the Nov. 3 referendum."
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | February 20, 1991
She was barely 18, a college student, and she was -- by he own description -- "careless, stupid and ignorant."She also was pregnant and her first thought was, "I have to get rid of it." Her second thought: "My parents cannot know about this."Call her Laura, said this woman, whose name is not Laura and whose parents still don't know that she had an abortion, even though 12 years have passed.And tell her story, she added, because it is relevant to the abortion-rights bill passed by the Maryland legislature this week.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
Five hours of hearings on the abortion issue yesterday changed no minds. The subject is well known to all 188 members of the General Assembly. Every delegate and senator has taken a position. In 1991, unlike 1990, legislative leaders have made it clear the matter will be voted upon in both the House and the Senate.Pro-abortion advocates have the upper hand. A majority of lawmakers seems committed to giving women the same right to an abortion in the initial stages of pregnancy that the Supreme Court stipulated in its Roe vs. Wade decision.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | November 9, 2005
CHICAGO -- Samuel A. Alito Jr. was nominated to the Supreme Court on Halloween morning, and it was soon clear he wouldn't need a costume to go trick-or-treating: His critics had already made him unrecognizable. What did we "learn" about this obscure federal appeals court judge? We heard that he is a hard-edged ideologue in the mold of Justice Antonin Scalia, so much so that he has been nicknamed "Scalito." We found out that he is against abortion rights. We were told he is likely to, in the words of National Public Radio correspondent Nina Totenberg, "eviscerate" the court's 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 19, 2005
BOSTON -- Now that we have waved "Bye, Bye, Brownie" to Michael Brown, the hapless head of FEMA, could we turn our sights back to another agency on the skids: the Food and Drug Administration? If FEMA is an example of a government run on cronyism, the FDA has become a portrait of a government run on ideology. After its blunders over Vioxx and defective heart devices, it has now deliberately tanked the homeland emergency contraceptives. Days before Katrina hit New Orleans and flooded the news, FDA chief Lester Crawford announced that he was indefinitely postponing the sale of Plan B over the counter.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 2, 2005
BOSTON - I won my merit badge in Raising a Teenager. I still wear this small and rather tattered patch on my maternal sleeve. So I get it. I understand the fear that your 15-year-old is in trouble and you're out of the loop. I understand the anger that someone else is with your 17-year-old in a crisis and you don't even know about it. This is why the laws requiring parental notification and consent have fared so much better than anything else on the anti-abortion wish list. No one thinks a teenage girl should go through the trauma of an unwanted pregnancy or the decision about abortion without a caring parent.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
The Carroll County school system's new search-and-seizure policy will require school officials to make "a reasonable attempt" to contact a parent after a student is searched on a school-sponsored trip. "I'm not convinced I like the `after' thing, but I'm glad [the policy] includes parent notification," said board member Laura K. Rhodes, who joined other members in approving the policy yesterday. At a board meeting two weeks ago, Rhodes asked for a parent-notification provision in the policy, which prompted school officials to rework it. At that time, she said she would prefer parents be notified before a search is conducted except in those cases where there is "clear and present danger."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2003
For teen-age drivers, getting a traffic ticket has just gotten worse. On top of the fines all motorists have to pay, teens will have a Maryland state trooper calling their parents about their driving mishaps. Under a policy announced yesterday, troopers will contact parents whenever a 16- or 17-year-old driver is pulled over for a motor vehicle infraction - whether it's for speeding, not wearing a seat belt or being at fault in an accident. At the traffic stop, troopers will ask teens for their parents' names and contact information, which will be forwarded to duty officers who will try to call parents and inform them of the violation.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and David Nitkin and Stephanie Desmon and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
A Senate committee killed legislation yesterday to allow women to get the so-called morning-after pill from pharmacists without having to see a doctor, one day after the measure won approval from the House of Delegates. The Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 6-5 to defeat the emergency contraception measure, which would have set regulations governing how women could get access to drugs used to prevent pregnancy. Proponents said the legislation would decrease the number of abortions performed in the state, while some opponents worried it would encourage young women to be promiscuous.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2003
For teen-age drivers, getting a traffic ticket has just gotten worse. On top of the fines all motorists have to pay, teens will have a Maryland state trooper calling their parents about their driving mishaps. Under a policy announced yesterday, troopers will contact parents whenever a 16- or 17-year-old driver is pulled over for a motor vehicle infraction - whether it's for speeding, not wearing a seat belt or being at fault in an accident. At the traffic stop, troopers will ask teens for their parents' names and contact information, which will be forwarded to duty officers who will try to call parents and inform them of the violation.
NEWS
October 4, 1992
Opponents of Question 6, the abortion law on the Novembe ballot, maintain the bill would allow minors to obtain abortions without their parents' knowledge. They say the law's provision requiring a physician to notify a parent has exceptions that make the requirement meaningless.Here are the facts: Currently, a girl under 18 years old can get an abortion in Maryland without parental involvement. If Question 6 passes, this state would have a parental notification requirement that meets constitutional muster.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
An old fight resurfaced yesterday in Annapolis as opposing sides of the abortion debate squared off on a proposal to toughen the state's parental notification law for minors. The bill by Del. Carmen Amedori, a Carroll County Republican, would change current law so that only a judge - not a doctor, as is now allowed - could permit girls to bypass the state's parental notification requirement. "If my kid goes in for oral surgery, I have to be notified," Amedori said as she prepared to testify before the House Health and Government Operations committee hearing on the bill.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2003
Sending a signal he will not waver on his deeply held beliefs, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele will break from the new Republican administration's stance on abortion tonight by joining the annual Annapolis March for Life rally. Steele's participation in the event is energizing members of Maryland's anti-abortion community, who say it is the first time in recent memory that a statewide elected official has actively embraced their cause. "It is an encouragement to the pro-life folks to see a newly elected official standing up for life," said David Lam, executive director of Maryland Right to Life, a sponsor of tonight's event.
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