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By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
From Liz Atwood: I can't believe I've come to the point where I actually would like to see the kids wasting their time playing video games.  What has driven me to this drastic change? Lately the kids have taken to wasting their time texting friends and posting pictures on Instagram and Twitter. Their new preoccupation with social media sets up a whole new challenge. In the past, I only needed to look at the rating on a game box to get a sense of whether the content was inappropriate.
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By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
My son's English teacher recently told me she was worried about how he was doing in her class. I had a long talk with him, and a few hours later he came to me asking for help understanding the directions for a research project. Good, I think. He's taking the warning seriously and getting to work. But as I started to look over the instructions, he pulled out his phone and began Snapchatting with friends. I told him to put the phone away, but he kept sneaking peeks at it even as I tried to talk with him about the assignment.
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIST | August 10, 2006
A few weeks ago, a friend had a cable jack installed in his bedroom, then slowly went bananas trying to get his TV to work properly. No matter what he tried, it would always skip some channels. Naturally, he blamed the cable company, which responded by dispatching a young technician to check out the signal and the new wall jack. Nothing wrong with either one. Then the lad had an inspiration: He pressed the setup button on the remote control, inspected an on-screen menu and pronounced the problem solved.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
From Liz Atwood: I can't believe I've come to the point where I actually would like to see the kids wasting their time playing video games.  What has driven me to this drastic change? Lately the kids have taken to wasting their time texting friends and posting pictures on Instagram and Twitter. Their new preoccupation with social media sets up a whole new challenge. In the past, I only needed to look at the rating on a game box to get a sense of whether the content was inappropriate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Hill and Jennifer Hill,COX NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2001
"Do I have a screen name?" my younger son asked, as we were driving home from school one day. "Yes," I answered somewhat warily, wondering what prompted the question and where it was leading. I knew the day was coming when the boys would no longer be content to roam the Internet using their mother's handle. Still it was disconcerting, similar to the way I felt when each boy told me I was no longer needed to walk them to class, a gentle but firm loosening of the apron strings. "What is it?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph Menn and Joseph Menn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2004
In the years since the federal government passed the 1998 law aimed at protecting children while they use the Internet, technology has made the job substantially easier. At the same time, the purveyors of adult material have become more aggressive as they seek to reach unwitting audiences of all ages. In their ruling Tuesday prohibiting enforcement of the Child Online Protection Act, five Supreme Court justices suggested that software filters could do more than a federal law to shield minors from inappropriate Web content.
NEWS
January 19, 2002
Violent video games are no way for kids to express themselves It's troubling, though not surprising, that one who sneeringly ridicules the idea of God ("How can anyone possibly believe in God?" Opinion*Commentary, Jan. 3) encourages his pre-teen son to play video games in which the chief goal is to devalue the life of other human beings ("Video games are the place to be bad," Opinion*Commentary, Jan. 11). I suppose this is part of the ennobling humanism that atheists appeal to. But I have a simple question for Crispin Sartwell: What would be your reaction if you happened upon a group of older teen-age boys in your neighborhood playing a video game in which the goal is to rape and murder 11-year-old boys?
NEWS
April 7, 1997
Balloon pollution at Oriole ParkAs part of the 1997 opening day festivities at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, approximately 3,000 balloons were released into the air.As I sat there staring in amazement, I wondered if the Orioles organization gave any thought to what would happen to those balloons after they were released.Those balloons will end up in the bay, streams and possibly being eaten by animals. As a high school senior, I am very concerned about the environment. I would have thought that a team that was concerned enough about their fans to postpone opening day would have shown a little more intelligence.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
My son's English teacher recently told me she was worried about how he was doing in her class. I had a long talk with him, and a few hours later he came to me asking for help understanding the directions for a research project. Good, I think. He's taking the warning seriously and getting to work. But as I started to look over the instructions, he pulled out his phone and began Snapchatting with friends. I told him to put the phone away, but he kept sneaking peeks at it even as I tried to talk with him about the assignment.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | February 17, 2010
Sixteen-year-old Arnold James has a hard time picturing life without his cell phone. "It would probably be like drug addicts feel when they're getting off of drugs," says the Wilde Lake High School student, who often uses his phone during school hours. "Sometimes your cell phone is a relief from the busy-ness at school and all the assignments." American youngsters such as James are now using cell phones, iPods and other electronic devices for an average of 7 1/2 hours daily - more than the equivalent of a full day of school, according to a recent national study tracking entertainment media habits.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | February 17, 2010
Sixteen-year-old Arnold James has a hard time picturing life without his cell phone. "It would probably be like drug addicts feel when they're getting off of drugs," says the Wilde Lake High School student, who often uses his phone during school hours. "Sometimes your cell phone is a relief from the busy-ness at school and all the assignments." American youngsters such as James are now using cell phones, iPods and other electronic devices for an average of 7 1/2 hours daily - more than the equivalent of a full day of school, according to a recent national study tracking entertainment media habits.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIST | August 10, 2006
A few weeks ago, a friend had a cable jack installed in his bedroom, then slowly went bananas trying to get his TV to work properly. No matter what he tried, it would always skip some channels. Naturally, he blamed the cable company, which responded by dispatching a young technician to check out the signal and the new wall jack. Nothing wrong with either one. Then the lad had an inspiration: He pressed the setup button on the remote control, inspected an on-screen menu and pronounced the problem solved.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph Menn and Joseph Menn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2004
In the years since the federal government passed the 1998 law aimed at protecting children while they use the Internet, technology has made the job substantially easier. At the same time, the purveyors of adult material have become more aggressive as they seek to reach unwitting audiences of all ages. In their ruling Tuesday prohibiting enforcement of the Child Online Protection Act, five Supreme Court justices suggested that software filters could do more than a federal law to shield minors from inappropriate Web content.
NEWS
January 19, 2002
Violent video games are no way for kids to express themselves It's troubling, though not surprising, that one who sneeringly ridicules the idea of God ("How can anyone possibly believe in God?" Opinion*Commentary, Jan. 3) encourages his pre-teen son to play video games in which the chief goal is to devalue the life of other human beings ("Video games are the place to be bad," Opinion*Commentary, Jan. 11). I suppose this is part of the ennobling humanism that atheists appeal to. But I have a simple question for Crispin Sartwell: What would be your reaction if you happened upon a group of older teen-age boys in your neighborhood playing a video game in which the goal is to rape and murder 11-year-old boys?
NEWS
By Mark W. Merrill | January 13, 2002
TAMPA, Fla. - When I arrived at work on Monday, I saw firsthand what can happen when a child feels as if his life is more than he can bear. I work in the downtown Tampa office building hit by the Cessna airplane flown by 15-year-old Charles Bishop. Since the crash, witnesses and reporters have made comparisons to Sept. 11. Concern has been raised over Charles' ability to fly into restricted air space over MacDill Air Force Base and the ease with which he stole the airplane in the first place.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2001
Before the Saturday afternoon youth soccer match in Columbia can begin, the 17-year-old referee gets an earful from the two head coaches. One warns him that parents from the two teams can't watch from the same sideline without risking a rumble; the other warns him of a father of one 12-year-old player who has gotten thrown off the field in a previous game for verbal abuse. Aaron Riner, a senior at Liberty High School and the match's head referee, can only shake his head and smile. He's heard it all before.
NEWS
By Mark W. Merrill | January 13, 2002
TAMPA, Fla. - When I arrived at work on Monday, I saw firsthand what can happen when a child feels as if his life is more than he can bear. I work in the downtown Tampa office building hit by the Cessna airplane flown by 15-year-old Charles Bishop. Since the crash, witnesses and reporters have made comparisons to Sept. 11. Concern has been raised over Charles' ability to fly into restricted air space over MacDill Air Force Base and the ease with which he stole the airplane in the first place.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 21, 1993
Ruth Taggart worried that her children, Christian, 12, and Justina, 16, watched too much television.So last spring the Torrance, Calif., single parent bought TV Allowance, a device resembling a desktop calculator and costing about $100, that limits TV time to nine hours a week for each child.Parents preset the machine, giving each child an access number and entering the number of hours of TV watching allowed. When time's up, the child's number won't turn on the set. The parent has an override code number.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Hill and Jennifer Hill,COX NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2001
"Do I have a screen name?" my younger son asked, as we were driving home from school one day. "Yes," I answered somewhat warily, wondering what prompted the question and where it was leading. I knew the day was coming when the boys would no longer be content to roam the Internet using their mother's handle. Still it was disconcerting, similar to the way I felt when each boy told me I was no longer needed to walk them to class, a gentle but firm loosening of the apron strings. "What is it?"
NEWS
April 7, 1997
Balloon pollution at Oriole ParkAs part of the 1997 opening day festivities at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, approximately 3,000 balloons were released into the air.As I sat there staring in amazement, I wondered if the Orioles organization gave any thought to what would happen to those balloons after they were released.Those balloons will end up in the bay, streams and possibly being eaten by animals. As a high school senior, I am very concerned about the environment. I would have thought that a team that was concerned enough about their fans to postpone opening day would have shown a little more intelligence.
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