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NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 1996
THE HAMMOND HIGH Boosters gratefully acknowledge the hours of time and the expertise given by parents and friends of the school. Without the dedicated efforts of these many volunteers, the school could not offer as rich an experience to its students.Of course, Hammond is particularly lucky in having parent volunteers. There are so many, their names have to be spread over several columns or the column would read like a phone directory.So here's a tip of the ol' hat to Becky Griffin, Sue Hanson, Maria Kyritsopoulos, Cindy Jones, Peter Jones, Mutsuko Kennerly, Marge Lally and Jeanette Lazarofsky.
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NEWS
November 22, 2013
The Greater Laurel United Soccer Club's fall season ended on Nov. 9; 301 boys and girls ages 4-18 took part in the program. All of this could not have been possible without the help of our dedicated volunteers. We would like to thank the following: U6: Gary Aldred, Emillee Carr, Ben Morgan; U8 Boys: Sid Zook, Jeremy Newkirk, Fred Agyeman, Andy Vernor, Mesmin Germain, Brian Smith, Antonio Portillo, Pam Dean, Brian Dean; U8 Girls: Beverly Gebhardt, Kevin Kenealy; U10 Boys: Joseph Bailor, Doug Spicher, Dion Johnson, Lars Kvale, Andrew Le; U10 Girls: Diego Rua, Psyche Forson, Kirk Zack, Joe Berry, Dion Johnson; U12 Boys: Jaime Blanco, John Camarano, Ben Morgan, Jim Murray; U12 Girls: Erin Justice, Karen Frederick, Michael Hicks; U14 Boys: Erin Justice, Dan Bowlds, Terry Butler; U14 Girls: Joe Berry, Bryan Bayer; high school boys: Mauricio Vargas; and youth referee coordinator: David Durnbaugh.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 1997
NORTH CALDWELL, N.J. -- All the attempts by a succession of governors to equalize educational programs in New Jersey's richest and poorest school districts -- including Gov. Christine Todd Whitman's new statewide curriculum standards -- never factored in people such as Linda McCabe.McCabe, who has two children in grade school here, a fondness for French painters and an enviable amount of free time, regularly visits her son's fourth-grade class to teach art appreciation. When she is not discussing the merits of still lifes, she might be planning a class party, serving tacos in the school cafeteria or raising money for new playground equipment.
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Lisa Schlossnagle is accustomed to giving her time to Fulton Elementary School. As a parent and volunteer, she spends time aiding teachers in her daughters' classrooms, representing the school as its PTA delegate, and attending countywide meetings report on issues facing the school system. She has taken roles at the classroom level, including as a tutor for the A-OK (Assist Our Kids) program, and at the systemwide level as a representative on the committee that worked on redistricting proposals last year.
NEWS
December 19, 1990
ELDERSBURG - Carrolltowne Elementary School opened up its own computer lab to students in October after purchasing the computers last year through the Giant Food "Apples for Students" program.Principal Ronald Burinsky is especially proud of the school's program since all of the computers were self-acquired. Two other schools in the county have complete computer labs, but they were donated by Potomac Edison Co.The school's goal this year is to give every student the opportunity to use and develop some knowledge of a computer.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | June 28, 1993
The end of the school year couldn't have arrived soon enough for Carroll County teachers and students, who had to go four days later than usual last week.But elementary teachers were also struggling to find time to record grades and permanent records, which had to be done by the last day.Some principals came through with innovative ideas, such as having parent volunteers come in. A few principals even took over classes themselves for a while.This year was the first time teachers weren't given an extra paid day after students had left.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | March 25, 2007
A group of students waiting their turn to be interviewed at Atholton High School joked with one another about what they would say if they were asked the "vegetable question." For two days last week, the school's juniors took part in the Junior Interview Clinic, practicing job-interview skills with parent volunteers as part of a springtime ritual that has long been a graduation requirement throughout the county. By the second day of the clinics, Wednesday afternoon, word had spread that one interviewer asked a student this question: "If you were a vegetable, what kind of vegetable would you be, and why?"
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | January 5, 2007
If Tuesday's first dress rehearsal was any indication, the Children's Theatre of Annapolis production of Bye Bye Birdie is going to pack an energetic wallop. Naturally exuberant, the well-primed group of 20 young performers was coaxed to higher levels by music director Kevin Kimble and never missed a step of the intricate dance routines. "The 38-member cast has worked incredibly hard, and you can feel the excitement from them and the crew at every rehearsal," producer Deb Engler said.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 1999
EVERY PUPIL entering Spring Garden Elementary School will see a large tree that climbs the foyer wall and arches its branches, which hang from the ceiling.The tree was built by every pupil, and many parents, for an Earth Day celebration late in the school year.It was planned by art teacher Jan VanBibber so that each of the school's 850 or so pupils would gain sculptural art experience. A group of parents modeled armature of chicken wire, plastic pipe and wood (donated by parent Joe Ibex).
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Parent volunteers will begin polling other parents of Moun Airy Elementary School first- and second-graders tomorrow in an effort to help state and county officials determine what in the building might be making some students sick.The only test results to provide a clue so far came just over a week ago, when school officials learned that Room 144, a former first-grade classroom, contained a high level of bacteria. The bacteria level is six times the normal rate.The school sent a survey in May to parents, but the low rate of return and other problems prevented officials from drawing any conclusions from it.State environmental officials are involved with county health and school officials in investigating causes of student illnesses at the so-called "sick school."
EXPLORE
By Eileen D'Andrea, eileendandrea@comcast.net | June 14, 2011
Mount Washington Elementary School hosted the annual Swing Into Spring fundraiser/party/auction to raise money for the school PTO. A wonderful event, held at the Mount Washington Conference Center, this year boasted one of the highest attendance records ever. I got to mingle and chat with tons of parents and friends of the school, including Felice Shore and Gregg Nass, Jason Loviglio and Anne Wolf, Marissa Feinsilver and Joe Urban, Madeleine Shea and Curt McKnight, Anath Ranon and Ellen Lichtman, Eddie Seidel and Shania Kroiz, Eric and Julie Salsbery, Joyce and Russell Holbrook, Cathy and Patrick McElroy, Nicole and Bill Selway, Jill Feinberg and David Fishkin, Phil Rhodes, Rebecca and Mike Bainum, Laura Laing and Gina Foringer, Cecilia Meisner, Terri Lough, Karen and Bob Brown, Kirsten and Larry Mackin, Lisa and Mark Kelemen, Charlie Nass and Jeannine August, Stuart Caplan and Rachael Levine.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | November 14, 2007
Matt DeCaro, a junior at Wilde Lake High School, had been rehearsing the same line for weeks: "Second to the right, and straight on to morning," he said. But this time, when he pointed to the sky, his body slowly lifted off the floor. He was flying back and forth across the stage, and so were the actors playing the three Darling children, Wendy, John and Michael. Wilde Lake, home to the 750-seat Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts, has long been known for the high quality of its student productions.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | March 25, 2007
A group of students waiting their turn to be interviewed at Atholton High School joked with one another about what they would say if they were asked the "vegetable question." For two days last week, the school's juniors took part in the Junior Interview Clinic, practicing job-interview skills with parent volunteers as part of a springtime ritual that has long been a graduation requirement throughout the county. By the second day of the clinics, Wednesday afternoon, word had spread that one interviewer asked a student this question: "If you were a vegetable, what kind of vegetable would you be, and why?"
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | January 5, 2007
If Tuesday's first dress rehearsal was any indication, the Children's Theatre of Annapolis production of Bye Bye Birdie is going to pack an energetic wallop. Naturally exuberant, the well-primed group of 20 young performers was coaxed to higher levels by music director Kevin Kimble and never missed a step of the intricate dance routines. "The 38-member cast has worked incredibly hard, and you can feel the excitement from them and the crew at every rehearsal," producer Deb Engler said.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2005
As president of the PTA at Deale Elementary School, Denise Motz finds that one of her challenges is making sure she taps all that wonderful volunteer energy offered by parents, especially the ones who want to help from home. She found ideas at a workshop Tuesday called Building Successful Partnerships, one of a dozen such workshops offered at the ninth annual Parent and School Volunteer Conference. Building Successful Partnerships was the theme of the conference. "They always share good information for us to take back," Motz said.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Sara Neufeld and Jennifer McMenamin and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
Thirteen Cockeysville Middle School pupils were injured yesterday morning when two school buses collided on the way to a state band festival in Frederick. All of the injured children, including a 13-year-old girl airlifted to Johns Hopkins Hospital with neck and jaw pain, were released yesterday afternoon. The school's band -- despite missing half its clarinet section, three horn players and a saxophonist -- went on to the state contest, where the group earned the highest rating possible.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | December 20, 1994
Friday morning found students at Eldersburg Elementary School laboriously writing, coloring and painting cards and presents for Christmas instead of studying science and social studies.Parent volunteers wandered around the four open space suites helping students sponge paint brown paper bags that would hold their Christmas present to their parents and making sure gifts had names on them. Little hands were colored red, green, yellow and blue from the paint.Students who had finished decorating a craft sat at their desks coloring and writing cheery messages to area nursing home residents using marking pens provided by a parent volunteer.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1994
Red tape, an improved economy and lost momentum finally took their toll on the parent volunteers at Jessup Elementary School who thought they could enclose the open spaces that once were the educational rage faster and cheaper than school officials.The Anne Arundel County Board of Education has taken over the $100,000 project."We would have loved to have seen the volunteers pull this off, but everything worked against them," said Ralph Luther, director of operations and maintenance for county schools.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 1999
EVERY PUPIL entering Spring Garden Elementary School will see a large tree that climbs the foyer wall and arches its branches, which hang from the ceiling.The tree was built by every pupil, and many parents, for an Earth Day celebration late in the school year.It was planned by art teacher Jan VanBibber so that each of the school's 850 or so pupils would gain sculptural art experience. A group of parents modeled armature of chicken wire, plastic pipe and wood (donated by parent Joe Ibex).
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1998
BROOKLYN PARK Middle School is sponsoring two meetings parents may wish to attend Tuesday.The first is a volunteer orientation at 9: 30 a.m. for anyone who helps with clerical pool duties, principal's newsletter, student government, team volunteers, fund raising, media center, guidance office and reading programs.The second meeting is a workshop called "What's New in Special Education?" from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the media center. This is an informal information session.Information: 410-691-4344.
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