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NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | December 19, 2007
How do I clean a bamboo steamer - the Chinese kind with interlocking baskets? You don't have to clean a bamboo steamer; in fact, you shouldn't. Residue from any dish-washing liquid would be absorbed by the porous bamboo. From a food-safety perspective, you have little to worry about. When you use your steamer, you are exposing it to very hot water vapor. Your dishwasher gets no hotter than the inside of the steamer. That said, food odors can work their way into the bamboo, but there's an easy fix: Don't steam food directly on the lattice surface of the steamer basket.
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By Donna Ellis | December 8, 2011
Despite the best efforts of the Calorie and Cholesterol Cops (CCC) to shame us, there are still those of us who really love to give gifts of goodies made by our own hands in our own kitchens. In order to be dietarily correct, however, I suppose we now have to carry on this annual culinary tradition (well, semi-annual, if you count our summertime zucchini bread orgy) with an eye to those on our gift list. Over-indulgers are definitely out. We probably should only give our homemade love to those who have managed to retain a grip on the old saw, "Moderation in all things.
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NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | November 23, 2005
Can I use wax paper instead of parchment paper when baking? Wax paper is paper that has been impregnated and coated with food-grade paraffin to make it stronger and more moisture-resistant than untreated paper. The Web site of Reynolds Consumer Products, maker of Cut-Rite wax paper, states that wax paper can be used in the oven as long as it never is exposed directly to heat. This means you can use it to line pans when you are baking cakes, brownies or muffins. For cookies, or anything else where the paper will be exposed to direct heat, you will need to use parchment paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011
While the en papillote ("in parchment") method of cooking might sound a little too fancy for tailgating, Mark Graham, in his Dinner Tonight column for the Chicago Tribune, has suggested that it's really nothing more than food wrapped in parchment paper and cooked. What may sound intimidating turns out to be a handy method for cooking at a tailgate or other outdoor party. The packets can be easily assembled at home and then grilled at the tailgate party. They travel well in a cooler of ice. Instead of parchment paper, which can be tricky for first-time users, his recipe uses foil for these salmon-and-veggie packets.
FEATURES
By Susanne Davis and Susanne Davis,Contributing Writer United Features Syndicate | May 30, 1993
Sealing a chop or a fish fillet in paper wrapping and popping it into a hot oven is hardly a new trick -- the French have done it for centuries. Louis XIV's mistress, Madame de Maintenon, is credited with inventing the technique. She had lamb chops trimmed of their fat and baked en papillote for those times when the royal digestion needed a respite from heavier fare.The beauty of this old method is its relevance to today's low-fat cooking. Meats, vegetables and fruits can all be prepared without adding a drop of fat. In the oven, steam rapidly builds up inside the package to cook the contents efficiently, without any loss of nutrients.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 13, 2005
The en papillote method of cooking may sound fancy and intimidating, but it's as simple as wrapping in parchment paper and cooking. Instead of parchment paper, which can be tricky for first-time users, we're using foil for these salmon-and-veggie packets. This dish is easily adaptable to the grill: Place the packets over indirect heat on a closed hot grill until the salmon is cooked through and the veggies are crisp-tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. The foil packets make for a fun presentation and are easy to clean up. Beverage pairing Try a crisp, well-chilled sauvignon blanc.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011
While the en papillote ("in parchment") method of cooking might sound a little too fancy for tailgating, Mark Graham, in his Dinner Tonight column for the Chicago Tribune, has suggested that it's really nothing more than food wrapped in parchment paper and cooked. What may sound intimidating turns out to be a handy method for cooking at a tailgate or other outdoor party. The packets can be easily assembled at home and then grilled at the tailgate party. They travel well in a cooler of ice. Instead of parchment paper, which can be tricky for first-time users, his recipe uses foil for these salmon-and-veggie packets.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | November 28, 2007
This time of year, a good rimmed baking sheet gets a real workout. Also known as a jellyroll pan, it's not only good for all those cookies you're baking, but for making sheet cakes and roasting vegetables. But cookies were on our mind, so we tested these pans with a simple rolled sugar-cookie recipe. All the cookies were baked in a preheated 375-degree oven on the upper middle rack. The sheet pans were tested ungreased, and no parchment paper was used. The prettiest and most uniformly browned cookies were produced on a moderately priced, uncoated restaurant supply pan we found online.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 19, 1997
I love recipes that can be used in more than one context. Risottos, for example, can be served as a first course or as an entree; a fresh fruit salad will work as salad or dessert; focaccias, those delicious Italian breads, can be presented as appetizers or as accompaniments to salads or soups.These mushroom flans are equally flexible. I've served them as a side dish with roast beef and as a first course. They can also be presented as the main course for a weekend brunch.These flans can be baked and unmolded a day ahead and then reheated when needed.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 26, 2008
Last fall, my husband and I were fortunate enough to take a weeklong cruise along the Dalmatian coast to the island of Corfu, then around the tip of Italy. The Greek isle turned out to be one of my favorite ports of call. As usual, the food got my attention. A small group of us decided to tour the center of Corfu's main town and to eat lunch in one of the many cafes that line its streets. The menu, all in Greek, was indecipherable, but fortunately our waiter helped. When I couldn't make up my mind about what to order, he suggested one of the restaurant's specialties - lamb and vegetables baked in parchment.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 26, 2008
Last fall, my husband and I were fortunate enough to take a weeklong cruise along the Dalmatian coast to the island of Corfu, then around the tip of Italy. The Greek isle turned out to be one of my favorite ports of call. As usual, the food got my attention. A small group of us decided to tour the center of Corfu's main town and to eat lunch in one of the many cafes that line its streets. The menu, all in Greek, was indecipherable, but fortunately our waiter helped. When I couldn't make up my mind about what to order, he suggested one of the restaurant's specialties - lamb and vegetables baked in parchment.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | December 19, 2007
How do I clean a bamboo steamer - the Chinese kind with interlocking baskets? You don't have to clean a bamboo steamer; in fact, you shouldn't. Residue from any dish-washing liquid would be absorbed by the porous bamboo. From a food-safety perspective, you have little to worry about. When you use your steamer, you are exposing it to very hot water vapor. Your dishwasher gets no hotter than the inside of the steamer. That said, food odors can work their way into the bamboo, but there's an easy fix: Don't steam food directly on the lattice surface of the steamer basket.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | November 28, 2007
This time of year, a good rimmed baking sheet gets a real workout. Also known as a jellyroll pan, it's not only good for all those cookies you're baking, but for making sheet cakes and roasting vegetables. But cookies were on our mind, so we tested these pans with a simple rolled sugar-cookie recipe. All the cookies were baked in a preheated 375-degree oven on the upper middle rack. The sheet pans were tested ungreased, and no parchment paper was used. The prettiest and most uniformly browned cookies were produced on a moderately priced, uncoated restaurant supply pan we found online.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
The delicate art of cooking fish and poultry in parchment was once the province of fine restaurants, where the gently singed packet was laid before the diner like a rustic gift. Now this elegant way to prepare food is as available to the home cook as the roll of parchment paper on the grocery-store shelf. "It never goes out of style," said Richard Stuthmann, director of instruction at Baltimore International College culinary school. "But it was out of reach for the home cook for a long time," he said, because parchment was a product available primarily to professional cooks.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | November 23, 2005
Can I use wax paper instead of parchment paper when baking? Wax paper is paper that has been impregnated and coated with food-grade paraffin to make it stronger and more moisture-resistant than untreated paper. The Web site of Reynolds Consumer Products, maker of Cut-Rite wax paper, states that wax paper can be used in the oven as long as it never is exposed directly to heat. This means you can use it to line pans when you are baking cakes, brownies or muffins. For cookies, or anything else where the paper will be exposed to direct heat, you will need to use parchment paper.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 13, 2005
The en papillote method of cooking may sound fancy and intimidating, but it's as simple as wrapping in parchment paper and cooking. Instead of parchment paper, which can be tricky for first-time users, we're using foil for these salmon-and-veggie packets. This dish is easily adaptable to the grill: Place the packets over indirect heat on a closed hot grill until the salmon is cooked through and the veggies are crisp-tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. The foil packets make for a fun presentation and are easy to clean up. Beverage pairing Try a crisp, well-chilled sauvignon blanc.
FEATURES
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 15, 1998
For most of the year, raspberries fall into the break-the-budget category, but for several weeks every summer most of us can feast on local raspberries at an affordable price.This is great news, since fresh raspberries are ready to use and add instant luxury to lazy summer desserts. If you want a truly instant dessert, just fill stemmed glasses with raspberries and whipped cream or cover vanilla ice cream with a handful of the berries.When choosing containers of raspberries, look for cartons that have no juice leaking out of the bottom and are filled with dark red berries without stems or hulls.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | December 8, 2011
Despite the best efforts of the Calorie and Cholesterol Cops (CCC) to shame us, there are still those of us who really love to give gifts of goodies made by our own hands in our own kitchens. In order to be dietarily correct, however, I suppose we now have to carry on this annual culinary tradition (well, semi-annual, if you count our summertime zucchini bread orgy) with an eye to those on our gift list. Over-indulgers are definitely out. We probably should only give our homemade love to those who have managed to retain a grip on the old saw, "Moderation in all things.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2003
Mary Engelbreit proclaims herself an unskilled cook. So it is a bit surprising that the popular artist, whose works adorn posters, greeting cards and home accents, has written a cookbook on party food. To whom the book is addressed is a bit of a mystery. The title, You're Invited: A Cookbook for Special Occasions (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2003, $29.95), would seem to imply that this is a manual for those looking for ideas on what to bring to the next potluck. The recipes and guidelines, however, are directed to the party host.
FEATURES
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 15, 1998
For most of the year, raspberries fall into the break-the-budget category, but for several weeks every summer most of us can feast on local raspberries at an affordable price.This is great news, since fresh raspberries are ready to use and add instant luxury to lazy summer desserts. If you want a truly instant dessert, just fill stemmed glasses with raspberries and whipped cream or cover vanilla ice cream with a handful of the berries.When choosing containers of raspberries, look for cartons that have no juice leaking out of the bottom and are filled with dark red berries without stems or hulls.
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