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NEWS
February 4, 1997
Police logWest Friendship: 3000 block of Sobus Drive: A dishwasher was taken Thursday or Friday from a house under construction.Simpsonville: 6900 block of Parchment Rise: Someone tried to steal a 1993 Infiniti J30 on Saturday.Scaggsville: 10700 block of Glen Hannah Drive: A light green 1993 Ford Escort, Maryland license plate CML-091, was stolen Saturday or Sunday.Pub Date: 2/04/97
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
A museum banner above the Walters Art Museum in Mount Vernon fell Friday afternoon, shattering a giant window, drawing emergency crews and closing the museum's ticket office for the day. The sign is located on the Centre Street side of the museum, said Mona M. Rock, museum spokeswoman. No one was hurt and only one pane was shattered - though it was a large one, she said. "We're just grateful no one was injured and we'll be fine," she said. Because the ticket office is closed, Rock said, the exhibit "The Book of the Faiyum," will be free to patrons on Friday.
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NEWS
March 25, 1996
Police logHickory Ridge: 6900 block of Parchment Rise: Someone stole a bike from a garage Thursday.Dorsey's Search: 5400 block of Columbia Road: A red 1990 Honda Accord with Maryland tags YSC-332 was stolen Wednesday or Thursday.Town Center: 10200 block of Little Patuxent Parkway: A green 1992 Honda Accord with Maryland tags BFC-780 and a light gray 1989 Isuzu Sidekick with Maryland tags AAJ-38J were stolen Thursday from the parking lot of The Mall.Pub Date: 3/25/96
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | October 25, 2011
The ugliest exhibit in town just now is at the Walters Art Museum. Let me explain. "Lost and Found: The Secrets of Archimedes" is a fascinating show capping 12 years of scholarly research into a rare book that contains texts by that ancient Greek mathematician. It's the book itself that is a wreck. What's nearly miraculous is that the book survived at all. The story of how it survived is as striking as the texts it contains. Archimedes, who lived in the Greek city of Syracuse in the third century B.C., had long passed from the scene when a 10th-century scribe in Constantinople copied some of his math-related treatises onto goatskin parchment.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
Experts at the Walters Art Museum have taken the Archimedes Palimpsest to Stanford University in California in an effort to decipher some of the prized document's detail with a particle accelerator. A Webcast is planned for 7 p.m. today to announce the latest findings. Researchers at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory are using X-ray fluorescence to decode the ancient text. The process takes advantage of iron in the ink used by the ancient scribe who copied Archimedes' work onto parchment.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
In the 17th century, Gravelly was the location of some of the earliest Colonial settlements in Harford County. The Episcopal Spesutia Church is considered the first place of worship erected in St. George's Parish. The name Spesutia is derived from the Latin for Utie's Hope, in honor of Col. Nathaniel Utie, a settler who was granted an island near Havre de Grace. The first record in the parchment church register is that of "the birth of John Cook, son of John Cook, born at Bush River, on the 25th of September, in the year of our Lord, 1681."
NEWS
October 15, 1997
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Howard County.Elkridge: 6300 block of Woodcrest Drive: Someone broke into a garage Sunday or Monday. A bicycle was stolen.Ellicott City: 10300 block of Wetherburn Road: Someone stole a purse Saturday after intruders walked into the house through an unlocked garage.Ellicott City: 7000 block of Route 100: Someone broke into the Maryland Mass Transit Administration office Friday and stole a safe that weighed 100 pounds. The safe contained money and a train ticket validator.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1995
Bucky Levin is the kind of Jewish man who knows more about the glory days of the Baltimore Colts than about the intricacies of his faith. For years, he traveled with the team, owned 107 pairs of season tickets at Memorial Stadium and counted the players as friends.But at 84, with the cheers for Alan Ameche long silent and most of his life behind him, Mr. Levin finds himself embracing the Judaism of his East Baltimore childhood the way he used to hug football stars after a big victory."I'm definitely a Jew, there's no question," said Mr. Levin, referring to his heart as much as his heritage.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | October 25, 2011
The ugliest exhibit in town just now is at the Walters Art Museum. Let me explain. "Lost and Found: The Secrets of Archimedes" is a fascinating show capping 12 years of scholarly research into a rare book that contains texts by that ancient Greek mathematician. It's the book itself that is a wreck. What's nearly miraculous is that the book survived at all. The story of how it survived is as striking as the texts it contains. Archimedes, who lived in the Greek city of Syracuse in the third century B.C., had long passed from the scene when a 10th-century scribe in Constantinople copied some of his math-related treatises onto goatskin parchment.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun The Sun The Sunday Sun | April 13, 1991
Only The Best, Ellicott City, 461-1278. A restaurant with a name that sets so lofty a standard almost invites criticism. And while I wouldn't call it unequivocally "the best," this charming Ellicott City newcomer tries hard, and succeeds more often than not. Only The Best is a pleasantly attractive restaurant with a small but wide-ranging menu. We chose Salmon and Crab in Parchment ($17.95) and Wahoo in Beaujolais Sauce ($15.95) as our entrees and found them simply, but deliciously, prepared.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
In the 17th century, Gravelly was the location of some of the earliest Colonial settlements in Harford County. The Episcopal Spesutia Church is considered the first place of worship erected in St. George's Parish. The name Spesutia is derived from the Latin for Utie's Hope, in honor of Col. Nathaniel Utie, a settler who was granted an island near Havre de Grace. The first record in the parchment church register is that of "the birth of John Cook, son of John Cook, born at Bush River, on the 25th of September, in the year of our Lord, 1681."
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
Experts at the Walters Art Museum have taken the Archimedes Palimpsest to Stanford University in California in an effort to decipher some of the prized document's detail with a particle accelerator. A Webcast is planned for 7 p.m. today to announce the latest findings. Researchers at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory are using X-ray fluorescence to decode the ancient text. The process takes advantage of iron in the ink used by the ancient scribe who copied Archimedes' work onto parchment.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
The delicate art of cooking fish and poultry in parchment was once the province of fine restaurants, where the gently singed packet was laid before the diner like a rustic gift. Now this elegant way to prepare food is as available to the home cook as the roll of parchment paper on the grocery-store shelf. "It never goes out of style," said Richard Stuthmann, director of instruction at Baltimore International College culinary school. "But it was out of reach for the home cook for a long time," he said, because parchment was a product available primarily to professional cooks.
FEATURES
By James Dao and James Dao,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - Despite its imposing architecture and stunning collection, the National Archives has never quite made the A-list of tourist attractions here. Even the city's official convention Web site does not list it on a suggested tour. But this week the archives will take an important step toward making its building and its precious contents more inviting, not just to history buffs but to the general public. Today, the 216th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution, President Bush, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and congressional leaders are to take part in a ceremony rededicating the archives' grand rotunda, closed for renovations since July 5, 2001.
NEWS
By Fred Kaplan and Fred Kaplan,BOSTON GLOBE | November 16, 2000
MOUNT VERNON, N.Y. - Neil Yerman sits at his worktable, leaning forward with a jeweler's intensity, his white-gloved hand guiding a goose-feather quill across a calf-skin parchment, sketching in each fine stroke another wisp of God's presence. Yerman is a sofer, the Hebrew word for a scribe who writes holy Jewish documents, in Yerman's case Torahs. The Torah - the scrolled text of the Five Books of Moses, the Old Testament from Genesis to Deuteronomy - is the holiest of all documents, the centerpiece of religious observance, not just on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, but on every Sabbath and, to the most observant of Jews, every day. And by Jewish law, every Torah must be written out - painstakingly, following certain rules precisely - by hand.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Will Noel knows a treasure when he sees it. Lately he has been like a man just put down in Ali Baba's cave.The treasure Noel is contemplating these days is a thousand-year-old book, containing ideas that go even deeper in time. It is the most important ancient text ever to fall into the care of the Walters Art Gallery, where Noel is curator of manuscripts and rare books.It is a "palimpsest," a twice-used book. The Archimedes Palimpsest.The original texts in the book were inscribed in Greek in the 10th century, probably in Constantinople while it was still a capital of the Christian world, and before it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453 and became a capital of the Islamic world.
NEWS
By Fred Kaplan and Fred Kaplan,BOSTON GLOBE | November 16, 2000
MOUNT VERNON, N.Y. - Neil Yerman sits at his worktable, leaning forward with a jeweler's intensity, his white-gloved hand guiding a goose-feather quill across a calf-skin parchment, sketching in each fine stroke another wisp of God's presence. Yerman is a sofer, the Hebrew word for a scribe who writes holy Jewish documents, in Yerman's case Torahs. The Torah - the scrolled text of the Five Books of Moses, the Old Testament from Genesis to Deuteronomy - is the holiest of all documents, the centerpiece of religious observance, not just on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, but on every Sabbath and, to the most observant of Jews, every day. And by Jewish law, every Torah must be written out - painstakingly, following certain rules precisely - by hand.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Will Noel knows a treasure when he sees it. Lately he has been like a man just put down in Ali Baba's cave.The treasure Noel is contemplating these days is a thousand-year-old book, containing ideas that go even deeper in time. It is the most important ancient text ever to fall into the care of the Walters Art Gallery, where Noel is curator of manuscripts and rare books.It is a "palimpsest," a twice-used book. The Archimedes Palimpsest.The original texts in the book were inscribed in Greek in the 10th century, probably in Constantinople while it was still a capital of the Christian world, and before it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453 and became a capital of the Islamic world.
NEWS
October 15, 1997
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Howard County.Elkridge: 6300 block of Woodcrest Drive: Someone broke into a garage Sunday or Monday. A bicycle was stolen.Ellicott City: 10300 block of Wetherburn Road: Someone stole a purse Saturday after intruders walked into the house through an unlocked garage.Ellicott City: 7000 block of Route 100: Someone broke into the Maryland Mass Transit Administration office Friday and stole a safe that weighed 100 pounds. The safe contained money and a train ticket validator.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1997
Sealed in inert helium in a bulletproof, bombproof and lightproof shrine at the National Archives, the Declaration of Independence seems as sacred and immutable as the Ten Commandments.And though Thomas Jefferson, the "author" of the Declaration in American mythology and his own mind, may have been inspired in his writing, he was no Moses receiving the tablets from Jehovah. The Declaration has always been an evolving document, never unchanging.On this Fourth of July, the day on which we traditionally celebrate the signing of the parchment document by the Founders, the Declaration of Independence means something very different to us than it did to Thomas Jefferson and the signers.
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