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NEWS
January 13, 2010
Howard County has received eight hybrid buses for its 28-vehicle paratransit fleet, enabling the replacement of 10-year-old vehicles that have about 300,000 miles on them - double their expected life span and mileage. Howard Transit uses the vehicles to provide by-appointment transportation for handicapped residents. The new hybrid vehicles cost $200,000 each, with three paid for with federal stimulus money and three more with county funds. The other two vehicles were paid for with 80 percent federal money and 10 percent each from the state and the county.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Veolia Transportation warned state officials that it will be laying off 78 employees in Baltimore as it stops servicing a portion of an unspecified contract, but added that most could be hired by the new contractor. The cuts are expected March 3. Veolia's notice to the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said the workers are based at a Huntingdon Ave. location. Veolia's services in Baltimore include paratransit. State labor officials said the company hopes that employees who don't switch to the new contractor will find other jobs at Veolia.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Veolia Transportation warned state officials that it will be laying off 78 employees in Baltimore as it stops servicing a portion of an unspecified contract, but added that most could be hired by the new contractor. The cuts are expected March 3. Veolia's notice to the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said the workers are based at a Huntingdon Ave. location. Veolia's services in Baltimore include paratransit. State labor officials said the company hopes that employees who don't switch to the new contractor will find other jobs at Veolia.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
UPDATES: • Baltimore County Police are monitoring the bridge carrying Belair Road over the Gunpowder River, north of Perry Hall and south of Kingsville, as the bridge's culverts have been jammed with large amounts of debris. The Maryland Emergency Management Agency has also been alerted. •There will be full service on all MARC train lines on Wednesday, though delays may occur due to signal problems and flood-related speed restrictions, the Maryland Transit Administration said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
The Maryland Transit Administration has awarded the contract to operate a paratransit service for thousands of disabled Marylanders every day to two out-of-state companies - replacing a Baltimore company whose service drew widespread criticism. The MTA decision would replace Yellow Transportation/Connex, the company that has operated the door-to-door Mobility service in the Baltimore region for most of the past 16 years. The company has been the subject of many complaints by its customers and disability rights advocates but has also been credited with saving the program when another contractor defaulted in the late 1990s.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
The Maryland Disability Law Center is going to court today to try to force the state to address long-standing problems in the transit system for disabled riders. After years of feeling their complaints about the system have been ignored, center attorneys say they will file suit today in federal court in Baltimore to force the Maryland Transit Administration to comply with the law and start fixing a long list of maladies. Riders have recounted waiting hours for vans or other vehicles to pick them up, being stranded in the cold or dark and being taken on absurd, circuitous routes to their destinations, trips that sometimes end up taking two or three times longer than they should.
NEWS
September 17, 1997
RELIABILITY IS one of the pillars of a successful public transportation service. Travelers need to be sure that vehicles will arrive on time, at the right stop, when heading to work, medical appointments or to link up with connecting routes.Unfortunately, reliable service is becoming a myth for riders of the Howard Area Transit Service (HATS). Some of them filed more than 30 complaints against the bus system in the first eight weeks after Yellow Transportation began operating the suburban network.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
Howard County's public bus system will start a home pickup service this fall for disabled county residents who cannot reach existing bus stops.The new service will double the 75-cent regular fare that disabled people and seniors pay if they wait at a bus stop to ride ColumBUS, the county's public bus system. But it is expected eventually to allow disabled citizens who qualify for the service to go more places than they can with the county's other transit service for the disabled.Called the Americans with Disabilities Act ParaTransit (ADAPT)
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
The Howard County transportation board voted unanimously Tuesday night to ask county executive Ken Ulman to restore funding for Sunday bus service next fiscal year after hearing impassioned pleas from about 40 desperate Howard Transit riders and one bus driver at a public hearing. Although the budget for fiscal 2011 is already adopted and a second public hearing on transit cuts is scheduled for June 22, board chairwoman Carol Filipczak said the board must act now, without waiting for the next hearing or $1.9 million worth of higher fares and service cuts to take effect July 1. Continuing Sunday service, which provides buses every two hours, would cost $166,000, she said.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
UPDATES: • Baltimore County Police are monitoring the bridge carrying Belair Road over the Gunpowder River, north of Perry Hall and south of Kingsville, as the bridge's culverts have been jammed with large amounts of debris. The Maryland Emergency Management Agency has also been alerted. •There will be full service on all MARC train lines on Wednesday, though delays may occur due to signal problems and flood-related speed restrictions, the Maryland Transit Administration said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
The Howard County transportation board voted unanimously Tuesday night to ask county executive Ken Ulman to restore funding for Sunday bus service next fiscal year after hearing impassioned pleas from about 40 desperate Howard Transit riders and one bus driver at a public hearing. Although the budget for fiscal 2011 is already adopted and a second public hearing on transit cuts is scheduled for June 22, board chairwoman Carol Filipczak said the board must act now, without waiting for the next hearing or $1.9 million worth of higher fares and service cuts to take effect July 1. Continuing Sunday service, which provides buses every two hours, would cost $166,000, she said.
NEWS
January 13, 2010
Howard County has received eight hybrid buses for its 28-vehicle paratransit fleet, enabling the replacement of 10-year-old vehicles that have about 300,000 miles on them - double their expected life span and mileage. Howard Transit uses the vehicles to provide by-appointment transportation for handicapped residents. The new hybrid vehicles cost $200,000 each, with three paid for with federal stimulus money and three more with county funds. The other two vehicles were paid for with 80 percent federal money and 10 percent each from the state and the county.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
The provider of van and bus services for Baltimore's disabled won an apparent victory yesterday as the state Board of Public Works deferred action so the company can appeal the award of a $43 million contract to two rival companies to take over the work. The board refused to award the contract after a marathon meeting dominated by accusations from two disappointed bidders that high Ehrlich administration officials rigged the procurement process for the transportation service as well as another lucrative contract to serve vulnerable Marylanders.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
The state Board of Public Works made a last-minute decision yesterday to delay the award of $43 million in contracts for transportation for the disabled to two out-of-state companies after a losing bidder filed a toughly worded protest. The move to take the contracts off the agenda clearly surprised some Department of Transportation officials, who arrived at the meeting expecting to present the contracts for approval despite a pending appeal by Yellow Transportation. The item was deferred to the next board meeting even though several disabled people came to Annapolis to weigh in on the disputed award to Laidlaw Transit Services of Overland Park, Kan., and MV Transportation of Fairfield, Calif.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
The Maryland Transit Administration has awarded the contract to operate a paratransit service for thousands of disabled Marylanders every day to two out-of-state companies - replacing a Baltimore company whose service drew widespread criticism. The MTA decision would replace Yellow Transportation/Connex, the company that has operated the door-to-door Mobility service in the Baltimore region for most of the past 16 years. The company has been the subject of many complaints by its customers and disability rights advocates but has also been credited with saving the program when another contractor defaulted in the late 1990s.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
The Maryland Disability Law Center is going to court today to try to force the state to address long-standing problems in the transit system for disabled riders. After years of feeling their complaints about the system have been ignored, center attorneys say they will file suit today in federal court in Baltimore to force the Maryland Transit Administration to comply with the law and start fixing a long list of maladies. Riders have recounted waiting hours for vans or other vehicles to pick them up, being stranded in the cold or dark and being taken on absurd, circuitous routes to their destinations, trips that sometimes end up taking two or three times longer than they should.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
The state Board of Public Works made a last-minute decision yesterday to delay the award of $43 million in contracts for transportation for the disabled to two out-of-state companies after a losing bidder filed a toughly worded protest. The move to take the contracts off the agenda clearly surprised some Department of Transportation officials, who arrived at the meeting expecting to present the contracts for approval despite a pending appeal by Yellow Transportation. The item was deferred to the next board meeting even though several disabled people came to Annapolis to weigh in on the disputed award to Laidlaw Transit Services of Overland Park, Kan., and MV Transportation of Fairfield, Calif.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
The provider of van and bus services for Baltimore's disabled won an apparent victory yesterday as the state Board of Public Works deferred action so the company can appeal the award of a $43 million contract to two rival companies to take over the work. The board refused to award the contract after a marathon meeting dominated by accusations from two disappointed bidders that high Ehrlich administration officials rigged the procurement process for the transportation service as well as another lucrative contract to serve vulnerable Marylanders.
NEWS
September 17, 1997
RELIABILITY IS one of the pillars of a successful public transportation service. Travelers need to be sure that vehicles will arrive on time, at the right stop, when heading to work, medical appointments or to link up with connecting routes.Unfortunately, reliable service is becoming a myth for riders of the Howard Area Transit Service (HATS). Some of them filed more than 30 complaints against the bus system in the first eight weeks after Yellow Transportation began operating the suburban network.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
Howard County's public bus system will start a home pickup service this fall for disabled county residents who cannot reach existing bus stops.The new service will double the 75-cent regular fare that disabled people and seniors pay if they wait at a bus stop to ride ColumBUS, the county's public bus system. But it is expected eventually to allow disabled citizens who qualify for the service to go more places than they can with the county's other transit service for the disabled.Called the Americans with Disabilities Act ParaTransit (ADAPT)
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