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By David Tayman, D.V.M | June 10, 2014
Q: Considering the cold, snowy winter we just had, can pet owners look forward to any relief this year in dealing with fleas, ticks and other parasites? A: Ahh, if only! Cold winters may reduce the parasite population, but these hardy and horrifying pests always make a comeback. So knowing your prevention options is as important as ever. External parasites include fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and sarcoptic mange. Fleas can cause maddening allergic skin reactions and transmit a scary variety of viral and bacterial diseases (as well as some internal parasites)
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NEWS
By David Tayman, D.V.M | June 10, 2014
Q: Considering the cold, snowy winter we just had, can pet owners look forward to any relief this year in dealing with fleas, ticks and other parasites? A: Ahh, if only! Cold winters may reduce the parasite population, but these hardy and horrifying pests always make a comeback. So knowing your prevention options is as important as ever. External parasites include fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and sarcoptic mange. Fleas can cause maddening allergic skin reactions and transmit a scary variety of viral and bacterial diseases (as well as some internal parasites)
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NEWS
By Sara Engram | February 8, 1998
IN THIS country, major medical news usually consists of high-technology advances in treating big killers like cancer or heart disease. In many parts of the world, it takes far less sophistication to have lifesaving results."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
At a lab on the edge of the Johns Hopkins University's East Baltimore medical campus, researchers grow tumors on mice so they can try and cure them. But one day, the cancer wouldn't grow. They tried again and again for months. Figuring there must be something different about this batch of mice, they finally discovered the rodents had been given a drug to prevent pinworm. Three years later, the common parasite treatment that retails for a few dollars a dose is being given to terminal brain cancer patients in a trial that could lead to more widespread use. Researchers who toiled for years for such a discovery said they still are investigating how it works.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
Eric Hoberg knows a lot about parasitic relationships.Not people. Organisms.He is one of about two dozen scientists in the world drawn to the stomachs of sea birds, the intestines of sheep and the lungs of deer -- in short, to the haunts of creatures that live inside other creatures.The 43-year-old parasitologist has gone literally around the world in pursuit of lungworms, tapeworms, flukes and other dependent critters, returning, usually with his "souvenirs," to his cramped office in a chilly basement storage room of the federal Beltsville Agricultural Research Center.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | March 21, 1992
Is it effective to treat your pet for worms using over-the-counter medications? The answer is often no.That's because our animals can harbor a confusing, potentially dangerous collection of internal parasites, such as roundworms, tapeworms, whipworms and heart- worms. Without knowing just what your pet has and the proper medication and dosage to eradicate the pests, you may be wasting your money and not helping your pet at all.A veterinarian can diagnose what's bugging your pet and prescribe the proper course of treatment.
NEWS
September 24, 1995
IF THE WORLD is your oyster, pray that it's in better shape than those beleaguered bivalves of the Chesapeake Bay.Just when watermen thought the worst had passed, and last season's harvest proved to be the best in three years, comes the news that two natural parasites have infected much of the bay's oyster population.Maryland's hot, dry summer this year nurtured the resurgence of deadly microorganisms MSX and Dermo. Reduced freshwater flows in spring raised the salinity of the bay to near-record levels, promoting explosive growth of the parasites.
NEWS
May 6, 1996
START WITH THE understanding that oysters are a foundation of the Chesapeake Bay's ecosystem, not just an appealing appetizer. Their health is fundamental to the health of the bay and the other fisheries of the estuary, as these mollusks purify millions of gallons of water daily and consume excess algae.Recovery of this important shellfish population relies on human efforts in replanting shells to which oyster larvae can attach, rebuilding oyster reefs to create natural habitat and moving oyster seed from hatchery to bay waters.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
In another blow for Maryland's beleaguered watermen, scientists say that the Chesapeake Bay's oysters are sick and dying again, less than a year after they seemed to be recovering from a seven-year bout with parasitic diseases.Spurred by the summer's drought, which made the bay's water much saltier than usual, the oyster diseases MSX and Dermo have returned with a vengeance.Oysters throughout the bay are infected with one or the other disease. Hardest hit is the lower bay, where MSX already has killed off more than half of the population, scientists say."
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2004
Schistosoma is not a pleasant creature. A parasitic worm about a centimeter long, it begins life by infecting snails and eventually emigrates to whatever body of water its host inhabits. When the creature crosses paths with a human, it grabs hold and burrows under the skin, making its way to the intestines or bladder, where it can live for more than a decade, gorging on blood cells. The worm, which infects 200 million people globally, can cause a variety of problems, from fever to liver damage.
FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Honeybees responsible for pollinating crops worth billions of dollars are under attack from a cocktail of fungicides and pesticides that weaken colonies and make them susceptible to a deadly parasite, according to a study by the University of Maryland and federal agriculture researchers. The report, published in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE this week, said contaminated pollen from seven different test crops on the East Coast reduced the ability of healthy bees to fend off a parasite that causes them to starve to death.
HEALTH
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | July 10, 2013
A new study has been making the rounds in the media concerning the health dangers of parasites found in cat poop. Dr. Robert H. Yolken, director of developmental neurovirology at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, and research psychiatrist Dr. E. Fuller Torrey spell out the public health concerns related to the eggs of Toxoplasma gondii microbes that are found in infected cats' feces. The Baltimore Sun did a story on Yolken's research on the possible link between the parasites and schizophrenia in 2010: "I couldn't understand why a disease like schizophrenia persists in humans," Yolken told The Sun. Through much of our history, "people who have these diseases don't reproduce very well, either because they're sick, or they've been locked up, or because they were killed.
FEATURES
By Bailey Shiffler and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Summer sickness isn't limited to humans -- watch for these common hot weather pet problems. Paw burns or cuts What it looks like: Your pet will likely be limping or avoiding walking on the affected paw, says Kim Hammond, owner and director of Falls Road Animal Hospital. The paw might be red, and the pad might be cracked, he said. What to do: If the pad is torn, raw or bleeding, Hammond recommends you take your pet to its vet for a checkup, as this can lead to infection.
NEWS
By David Nakamura, The Washington Post | May 2, 2011
Canterbury Farms on Maryland's Eastern Shore is the nation's largest breeder of Polish Arabian stallions, a place where horses "feel at home," according to its website, and where a walk among the paddocks "will leave you with the feeling that you are visiting puppies in horse clothing. " But when investigators from Queen Anne's County arrived two weeks ago, they found that many of the farm's 146 horses were emaciated, including more than a dozen that each was 300 pounds underweight, officials said.
NEWS
March 24, 2011
Candus Thomson 's article in The Baltimore Sun, ("Destructive parasite infecting state capital," March 20), was insightful, perceptive and right on the mark. Annapolis is infested by a terribly destructive parasite, Legislativus horribilis, the main properties of which are "no backbone or vision. " This parasite has harmed our wetlands and wildlife areas (e.g., Program Open Space), hurt our fisheries, failed to back up our wonderful Natural Resources Police in their efforts to keep poachers from stealing oysters and fish, failed to protect our menhaden stocks and lacked the backbone to restore our beautiful Chesapeake Bay from its current status of "cesspool.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2010
Johns Hopkins University scientists trying to determine why people develop serious mental illness are focusing on an unlikely factor: a common parasite spread by cats. The researchers say the microbes, called Toxoplasma gondii , invade the human brain and appear to upset its chemistry — creating, in some people, the psychotic behaviors recognized as schizophrenia. If tackling the parasite can help solve the mystery of schizophrenia, "it's a pretty good opportunity … to relieve a pretty large burden of disease," said Dr. Robert H. Yolken, director of developmental neurobiology at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
The Asian oyster touted as a replacement for the vanishing Chesapeake Bay species is a host to parasites in Chinese and Japanese waters similar to one that has already decimated the native oyster, scientists reported yesterday. Researchers from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science said genetic and microscopic studies of the Asian bivalves have identified two Perkinsus parasites related to the microbe that produces deadly dermo infections in bay oysters, plus a herpes virus that could threaten oyster hatcheries.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
A Johns Hopkins study shows that anglers who fish Baltimore's urban tributaries risk getting sick because so many fish are infected with parasites that can cause stomach ailments and, in rare cases, fatalities. Worse yet, those most likely to eat their catch regularly are the ones least aware of the dangers, according to Ellen K. Silbergeld, an epidemiologist and a toxicologist at the university's Bloomberg School of Public Health. Silbergeld surveyed the habits of 1,000 licensed fishermen by mail and interviewed 70 urban anglers at popular fishing spots in and around the city.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Mary Gail Hare and Laura McCandlish and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporters | April 14, 2007
At the request of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Carroll County Humane Society will trap wild animals living in the vicinity of a quarantined Marston farm beginning Monday in order to test them for a potentially deadly parasite, officials said yesterday. Raccoons, possums, foxes and skunks, all of which may feed on carcasses, will be captured in box traps, euthanized and tested for "trichinella spiralis" to determine if pigs escaping from the farm infected surrounding wildlife.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 23, 2007
ACCIDENT -- Mark Harmon remembers the first hint of something funny with the trout at the state's Bear Creek hatchery in Western Maryland. The fish were swimming in circles. "You ever see a puppy chasing its tail? That's what they looked like," said Harmon, the hatchery's assistant manager. As it turns out, the fishes' spines and skulls were being deformed by a deadly parasite called Myxobolus cerebralis. The microscopic species causes an infection known as "whirling disease" that has decimated trout populations in Colorado, Montana and other Western states.
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