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NEWS
February 2, 2010
I am writing this in response to Diane Kelly's letter regarding radio station WTMD potentially occupying the Senator Theatre (Readers respond, Feb. 2). Ms. Kelly, your comments regarding the proposal smack of unwarranted paranoia. Yes, it is true that Towson University has no control over students when they are off campus. They are, after all, young adults and are responsible for their behavior, whether it be on or off campus. However, you seemingly have a jaundiced perception of these students as drunken, despicable louts who urinate on the neighbors' lawns at odd hours of the night.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 10, 2013
We're living in the eye of a perfect storm of weather anxiety - climate change and extreme storms, increasingly accurate forecasts by meteorologists, and the power and desire of news media to fully exploit our fears. Even a day or two of rain stirs a little panic now. By the time it reached Maryland and the mid-Atlantic late last week, Tropical Storm Andrea had turned into nothing but intermittently heavy rains and gusty winds. Yet you could almost sense the region's collective blood pressure rise as the storm approached.
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NEWS
November 30, 2011
In October, protesters against genetically modified foods marched through Baltimore on their way to Washington. Their goal is to make Congress require that all genetically modified foods be labeled as such, but the effect will to spread superstition rather than increase awareness about these products. The witch hunt against genetically modified foods has been gaining traction. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 93 percent of the soybeans and 86 percent of the corn grown in the U.S. in 2009 were genetically modified crops.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
For those who missed it, the National Rifle Association's top executive got worked up into a full lather at the group's annual conference this weekend in St. Louis. Wayne LaPierre's ire was aimed at the "sensational" coverage of the Trayvon Martin killing - although he didn't mention either the victim or the shooter by name. The NRA's beef is essentially this: Lots of people are getting killed every day without nearly so much mainstream media coverage. Why so much attention to this particular case?
NEWS
By R. Richard Banks | January 3, 1991
PARANOIA often blurs the boundary between the rational and the absurd.When a U.S. Department of Education official recently observed that universities cannot sponsor race-exclusive scholarships, the ensuing uproar forced the administration to recant.After the blizzard of criticism, Michael Williams, the Education Department official, declared that his view had been "legally correct" but "politically naive." Not only was his view legally correct; it made sense.In the swirl of America's racial maelstrom, common sense and logical reasoning are early casualties.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 27, 1997
TNT offers a double dose of presidential paranoia tonight, courtesy of director John Frankenheimer (whose most recent work, "George Wallace," debuted on TNT last weekend). Both are taut, suspenseful and pretty much guaranteed to hook you, once started, into watching the whole thing.First up is "The Manchurian Candidate" (8 p.m.-10: 45 p.m.), with Laurence Harvey as a brainwashed Korean War vet with his sights set on the White House. Frank Sinatra is the commanding officer whose brain has been similarly programmed, although perhaps not as well.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 25, 2007
Paranoia strikes deep ... into your life it will creep," were words in the 1967 Buffalo Springfield hit "For What It's Worth." The song, which told of police handling a disturbance involving young people, came to symbolize the divisions within the turbulent 1960s. Paranoia did not end then. While most evident today in politics, business can claim its fair share. U.S. companies, especially those that are innovative or undergoing change, worry night and day. They worry about U.S. competitors, foreign competitors, shareholders and employees who know too much or talk too much.
NEWS
By CHARLES LANE | August 27, 1995
Did even Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. ever imagine that the cop who found the bloody glove at O. J. Simpson's house, Mark Fuhrman, would say on tape all those ugly things everybody now knows that he said? Seems Detective Fuhrman is dumb enough to use the "n-word," then deny it under oath. Now you can't just dismiss the defense theory that O. J. was set up.The prosecutors in Oklahoma City better not take a conviction for granted, either. At about the time the Fuhrman tapes surfaced, the paranoid fantasies of the ultra-right also received an unexpected fillip.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | May 31, 1994
Leaders of the Nation of Islam believe there is a Jewish conspiracy to destroy their faith and cripple the black community -- a conspiracy aided by the highest powers in the land and abetted by blacks whom the Nation calls "traitors, Uncle Toms, quislings, and sell-outs."I believe the leaders of the Nation of Islam are wrong.But Sunday's attempted assassination of Khallid Abdul Muhammad, a former spokesman for Minister Louis Farrakhan, is guaranteed to fuel the Nation's paranoia. In fact, events seem to have conspired to reinforce the Nation's bigotry, anti-Semitism, and sense of persecution ever since Mr. Muhammad's controversial speech last November where he called Jews the "bloodsuckers" of the black community.
NEWS
By Laird Anderson | March 9, 1997
WHAT I REMEMBER most about Albania are the thousands of crumbling concrete military bunkers that dot the landscape. The bunkers are everywhere, an estimated 500,000 to 700,000 of them, scattered across farmlands and plastered against hillsides. These dilapidated structures stand watch today as monuments to the paranoia of one of Communism's most tyrannical and ideologically rigid dictators, the late Enver Hoxha, who ruled from 1944 until his death in 1985.They also are oddly symbolic of the nation's plight today as its first democratic government finds itself besieged by chaos.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 15, 2012
So wait: Are we going to have a genitalia check in Baltimore County before we get to use the restroom at McDonald's? Help me out, somebody. I might be confused - apparently, there's a lot of that going around these days - but I'm pretty sure I read these words in this very newspaper: "If your human anatomy is male, you should go to the [men's] room. " This eloquence soared from the lips of a Baltimore County council member - John A. Olszewski Sr., Democrat of Dundalk - who apparently thinks a proposed county law that would specifically prohibit discrimination against transgender people should not apply to public bathrooms and locker rooms.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
In October, protesters against genetically modified foods marched through Baltimore on their way to Washington. Their goal is to make Congress require that all genetically modified foods be labeled as such, but the effect will to spread superstition rather than increase awareness about these products. The witch hunt against genetically modified foods has been gaining traction. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 93 percent of the soybeans and 86 percent of the corn grown in the U.S. in 2009 were genetically modified crops.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
The return of "Mad Men" last week already makes AMC the place to go Sunday nights for the finest drama on television this summer. Tonight comes a second reason to choose this cable channel, with the two-hour debut of "Rubicon," a richly textured conspiracy thriller created by three-time Peabody Award-winner Henry Bromell, a writer well-known to Baltimore audiences from the years when he lived and worked here as an executive producer of "Homicide: Life...
NEWS
February 2, 2010
I am writing this in response to Diane Kelly's letter regarding radio station WTMD potentially occupying the Senator Theatre (Readers respond, Feb. 2). Ms. Kelly, your comments regarding the proposal smack of unwarranted paranoia. Yes, it is true that Towson University has no control over students when they are off campus. They are, after all, young adults and are responsible for their behavior, whether it be on or off campus. However, you seemingly have a jaundiced perception of these students as drunken, despicable louts who urinate on the neighbors' lawns at odd hours of the night.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | January 29, 2010
Movie-goers off to see the new Mel Gibson movie "Edge of Darkness," a compressed two-hour version of the six-hour 1985 British TV miniseries, are likely to be doing so because their man Mel is back on the edge, on the boil and on the trigger after nearly eight years off as a top-line screen actor. ("Signs" was his most recent starring role.) But other factors work in this conflicted, still entertaining thriller's favor. Among them: Ray Winstone as assassin/fixer/philosopher of mysterious employ, who quietly becomes the most intriguing character, and co-writer William Monahan's fabulous way with vaguely threatening doublespeak.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | January 7, 2010
A s everyone around here knows, Baltimore is the home office for paranoid football fans. Each Sunday when the Ravens take the field, their fans are consumed with one singular thought: How will the refs hose us this time? See, with Ravens fans, it's never a question of whether their team is going to get hosed. It's just a question of how bad the hosing will be. Will it be a major soul-sucking hosing like the one the Ravens got in their 27-14 loss to the Green Bay Packers, when they were penalized so often you'd have thought it was snowing yellow flags?
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | June 12, 2005
There can be something constructive about paranoia. It keeps you on your toes, helps you avoid being blindsided. Investors have a well-earned right to be paranoid. There has been that messy fraud surrounding Enron, WorldCom, HealthSouth, Qwest, Adelphia and so many other companies. Hanky-panky was going on that trusting employees and shareholders never knew about. Prosecutors have also made large settlements with brokerage companies, mutual funds and insurance companies regarding charges that clients were not investing on a level playing field.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Correspondent FTC | January 12, 1991
SAN FRANCISCO -- Success doesn't only breed success in the National Football League.It's sometimes breeds pressure and paranoia, also.There was a lot of talk about the "P" words around the San Francisco 49ers this week.George Seifert even referred to himself as a paranoid coach, and he acted like one, closing practice to members of the media and having a fan chased out of a eucalyptus tree overlooking the practice field.Listening to Seifert, it was easy to forget he's taking a 31-4, two-year record as a head coach into today's National Football Conference playoff game against the Washington Redskins at Candlestick Park.
NEWS
By Eric Boehlert | April 14, 2009
In the wake of the killing of three police officers in Pittsburgh, we've learned that Richard Poplawski, the killer, was something of a conspiracy nut. He embraced dark, radical rhetoric about America and was convinced the government, at President Barack Obama's command, was going to take away his guns. In the month before his killing spree, Mr. Poplawski reportedly posted a link on a white nationalist Web site to a video of Fox News' doomsday host Glenn Beck as he referenced a conspiracy theory about how the federal government, under the auspices of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, was building concentration camps in order to institute totalitarian rule.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 19, 2008
BEIJING - In a flash, China stopped moving. When track star and national hero Liu Xiang limped out of the Olympics with an injury yesterday, the nation froze, the only movement coming from the tears dripping down shocked and expressionless faces. Fans, Chinese reporters and Liu's coach wept. Seventy-five thousand Olympic volunteers gathered in thick packs around televisions. Not only had China stopped, but so had the Games, which is probably fitting, all things considered. The Olympics reached their finish line earlier than expected this time around.
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