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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 13, 1997
SEATTLE -- In the first of many courtroom challenges expected nationwide, lawyers defending members of a paramilitary group in Washington are seeking to cast doubt on a federal expert's testimony by citing a government report on sloppy work in the FBI's crime laboratories.The Justice Department report on whether the laboratories mishandled evidence has yet to be released, but a draft version described grave problems.Federal prosecutors, aware that the report could become an issue in their case against seven paramilitary group members facing explosives, firearms and conspiracy charges here, made parts of the draft available to the defense.
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By Vera Leone | September 2, 2008
Imagine you're Cheye Calvo, the white mayor of Berwyn Heights, an affluent part of Prince George's County. Coming home one night in late July, you find on your front porch a large package that, unbeknownst to you, happens to contain a lot of marijuana. As it turns out, your spouse is the victim of a drug-smuggling scheme that targets innocent customers in the UPS system. You bring the box inside; moments later, the SWAT officers standing by break in and shoot your two beautiful Labradors.
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NEWS
By Paul de la Garza and Paul de la Garza,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 1, 2000
DORADAL, Colombia -- Ramon Isaza, a small, handsome, dark-skinned man with a crown of curly black hair, greets a visitor to his second-floor patio wearing black Topsiders, black jean shorts, and a black-and-white T-shirt. As the sounds of Colombian music float in from the living room, his wife, Estermila, walks around in a red-checkered dress with cups of coffee for him and his guests. Everyone around Ramon Isaza, 59, addresses him with the title of Don, as a sign of respect. An admirer tells a visitor how Doradal, a village of 3,000 people in the mountains of northern Colombia, loves Isaza.
NEWS
By DANIEL BLAND | June 16, 2006
A map published this year by the Colombian newsmagazine Semana shows the location of 183 known massacre sites around the country. But the magnitude of the paramilitary slaughter in Colombia likely never will be fully documented. Typically, paramilitary soldiers enter rural villages and round up townspeople they accuse of collaborating with leftist guerrillas. Some are tortured and killed and many others are taken away, never to be seen again. Human rights groups estimate there are tens of thousands of disappearances in Colombia that can be linked to the country's 50-year-long conflict.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2004
BOGOTA, Colombia - Trading combat fatigues for business suits, three top commanders of Colombia's right-wing death squads emerged from their government-granted haven in the north to speak before the country's Congress yesterday, professing firm commitment to fragile peace talks aimed at disarming their 15,000-member paramilitary force. Traveling with government-issued 48-hour safe-conduct passes shielding them from arrest and, in the case of one of the three, extradition to the United States on drug charges, they flew to Bogota on a military plane and were escorted to the ornate Capitol by state security forces.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Federal authorities arrested yesterday 12 people they said were members of an Arizona paramilitary group, and charged them with conspiracy to blow up a number of federal buildings and the Phoenix Police Department.The authorities called it the largest roundup of members of a paramilitary group on serious charges. They said that those arrested were members of the "Viper Militia," a small, little-known paramilitary organization whose activities have, so far, been confined to Arizona.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2004
BOGOTA, Colombia - The Colombian government blamed leftist rebels yesterday for the killing of 34 coca pickers in a rampage that has aroused fears of a new wave of drug-fueled violence. The attack, Tuesday morning in the cocaine-rich La Gabarra municipality, was the worst since hard-line President Alvaro Uribe Velez took office in August 2002. He began an aggressive military offensive against Colombia's armed outlaws and opened peace talks with right-wing paramilitary death squads. The government blamed the massacre on rebels.
NEWS
October 8, 1994
The Haitian Senate approved legislation allowing exile President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to grant amnesty to leaders of the 1991 coup that toppled him.The United States will forcibly remove military leader Raoul Cedras and members of his government if they do not leave office by next Saturday, U.S. officials said.About 5,000 pro-democracy Haitians marched in Port-au-Prince to army headquarters to demand Lt. Gen. Cedras's departure.Paramilitary violence continued in Cite Soleil, a pro-Aristide stronghold and one of the capital's worst slums.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 7, 2001
LONDON - Moving closer to taking weapons out of Northern Ireland's politics, the Irish Republican Army proposed a method to get rid of its arms, an international panel announced yesterday as the British province's 3-year-old peace deal hung in the balance. British Prime Minister Tony Blair described the initiative as "an important step forward," and Irish premier Bertie Ahern called it "historic." But the IRA's critics, who have long demanded that the outlawed Catholic paramilitary group disarm, noted no details were provided about how, when or where it would dispose of its weapons.
NEWS
By DANIEL BLAND | June 16, 2006
A map published this year by the Colombian newsmagazine Semana shows the location of 183 known massacre sites around the country. But the magnitude of the paramilitary slaughter in Colombia likely never will be fully documented. Typically, paramilitary soldiers enter rural villages and round up townspeople they accuse of collaborating with leftist guerrillas. Some are tortured and killed and many others are taken away, never to be seen again. Human rights groups estimate there are tens of thousands of disappearances in Colombia that can be linked to the country's 50-year-long conflict.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 24, 2005
TORIBIO, Colombia - One recent morning, just as the sun was coming up, guerrillas from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, better known by their Spanish acronym FARC, made an announcement to this largely indigenous town via bullhorn: Vacate the premises because we are about to attack. The fighting that followed continues and has left at least five policemen, two soldiers and a 9-year-old village boy dead, as well as 23 people injured and dozens of houses in ruin. The attack, which started week before last, was FARC's second assault in two years on this town and highlighted the difficulty Indian villages feel throughout this region.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2004
BOGOTA, Colombia - Trading combat fatigues for business suits, three top commanders of Colombia's right-wing death squads emerged from their government-granted haven in the north to speak before the country's Congress yesterday, professing firm commitment to fragile peace talks aimed at disarming their 15,000-member paramilitary force. Traveling with government-issued 48-hour safe-conduct passes shielding them from arrest and, in the case of one of the three, extradition to the United States on drug charges, they flew to Bogota on a military plane and were escorted to the ornate Capitol by state security forces.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2004
BOGOTA, Colombia - The Colombian government blamed leftist rebels yesterday for the killing of 34 coca pickers in a rampage that has aroused fears of a new wave of drug-fueled violence. The attack, Tuesday morning in the cocaine-rich La Gabarra municipality, was the worst since hard-line President Alvaro Uribe Velez took office in August 2002. He began an aggressive military offensive against Colombia's armed outlaws and opened peace talks with right-wing paramilitary death squads. The government blamed the massacre on rebels.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 11, 2002
LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair told Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams yesterday that Irish republicans had to abandon their "dual strategy" of combining paramilitary activity with participation in politics if peace in Northern Ireland is to be assured. "We still in Belfast and elsewhere have got pockets of real and totally unacceptable violence, we have got a situation where there is still a mix between the political and the paramilitary strategies of the republicans," Blair said. He made his remarks to ITV news after an hour-long crisis meeting at 10 Downing St. with Adams and other leaders of Sinn Fein, the political wing of the Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 25, 2002
LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair, decrying the persistence of violence in Northern Ireland, called yesterday on the province's paramilitary groups to disband and warned that the government would become more "rigorous" in punishing them for violating their cease-fire claims. "It is no longer sufficient just that there should be no terrorist violence," Blair told the House of Commons. "We have to be clear that preparations for violence have also ceased." He said that while no one expected the 1998 agreement to bring peace to the long-conflicted province overnight, it was "intolerable" that violence continued to block progress four years later.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
The first American to die in combat in Afghanistan was a Central Intelligence Agency paramilitary officer killed Sunday during a bloody revolt by al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners in a mud-walled fortress near Mazar-e Sharif, the CIA said yesterday. The death of Johnny Micheal "Mike" Spann, 32, underscored the key role CIA paramilitary officers are playing in guiding U.S. attacks, interrogating prisoners and tracking Osama Bin Laden. The agency's deployment on the ground in Afghanistan is the largest since the war in Vietnam and signals a new, more assertive CIA role in battling terrorism, government officials and outside experts say. "This is not any longer a passive agency devoted to quietly collecting and analyzing data," said Ted Gup, a veteran journalist and author of a book on CIA operatives' deaths.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondents | October 1, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- U.S. officials struggled yesterday to explain why U.S. forces stood by while pro-junta paramilitaries violently disrupted a showpiece march for democracy yesterday, ending with five dead and 14 injured.Among the dead was a Haitian driver for a U.S. television network. Two other U.S. journalists were wounded and were being treated last night aboard the hospital ship USS Comfort. One of the paramilitary "attaches" was chased and captured by the crowd and beaten to death.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | December 2, 1992
BELGRADE -- Belgrade schoolboys have a new hero. They're calling him their James Dean. He died young last month, assassinated Chicago gangster-style at age 22. Five bullets were pumped into him when he answered the door of his luxury hotel room dressed in his trademark heavy gold chain and leather jacket.Tributes to Alexander Knezevic filled the death-notice pages of Belgrade's newspapers. A new pop song: "It's Hard to Live" has been devoted to him. Legend and reality already are blurring, but he is credited with exploits from running protection rackets worth hundreds of thousands of dollars to robbing Belgrade's main casino to being a killer in a Serbian paramilitary group.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 7, 2001
LONDON - Moving closer to taking weapons out of Northern Ireland's politics, the Irish Republican Army proposed a method to get rid of its arms, an international panel announced yesterday as the British province's 3-year-old peace deal hung in the balance. British Prime Minister Tony Blair described the initiative as "an important step forward," and Irish premier Bertie Ahern called it "historic." But the IRA's critics, who have long demanded that the outlawed Catholic paramilitary group disarm, noted no details were provided about how, when or where it would dispose of its weapons.
NEWS
By Tod Robberson and Tod Robberson,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | December 30, 2000
TRES ESQUINAS, Colombia - It's hard enough to be a 15-year-old anywhere in the world. In rural Colombia, adolescence has a particularly hellish twist. For Giseth, a high school student, there are the eternal boy problems and lots of homework. Then she has questions about the future, about whether to become a biologist or a veterinarian, and whether Colombia's insurgents will let her live long enough to decide. "Everyone hears the same stories. The guerrillas or the paramilitaries will come and take us away by force," she says, playing with a ponytail.
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