Advertisement
HomeCollectionsParallel Universe
IN THE NEWS

Parallel Universe

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2004
It's not set in a particular period or place, nor is it quite contemporary, yet it looks oddly if fantastically familiar, like the more vividly stylized fragments of a vaguely remembered dream. A parallel universe. That's what the production designer and set decorator of Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events were going for, a parallel universe, one that that subverts time, location and place. A universe they describe as "Victorian expressionism." It's also a universe that recalls the magic and inventiveness of The Wizard of Oz or the '40s Technicolor extravaganzas such as The Pirate and Yolanda and the Thief of director Vincente Minnelli.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: RANNYGAZOO Either you are charmed by P.G.Wodehouse's parallel universe of Edwardian flippancy or you are not, and if you are not, this is the place to step off. Rannygazoo , (pronounced ran-ee-ga-ZOO) it turns out, is not a piece of Edwardian slang, but a solid Americanism from the late nineteenth century that Wodehouse gleefully lifted, as Michael Quinion explored at World Wide Words . It means, Mr. Quinion explains, "a deceptive story or scheme, pranks, tricks or other irritating or foolish carryings-on," the last sense being utterly Wodehousian.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 3, 2001
It's daring, but is it wise? It seems like socially conscious television, but could it wind up being seen instead as an act of unrestrained ego? Those are the kinds of questions that greet the return of The West Wing tonight with a special episode written by creator Aaron Sorkin in response to terrorist attacks on America Sept. 11. NBC has chosen neither to make the episode available for preview nor to offer many specifics. But, given the enormity of the events to which it promises to speak and the incredible risk Sorkin and NBC are taking with one of America's most beloved series, a little context couldn't hurt.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
There's an old joke about two hikers in the woods encountering an angry bear. When one turns to run, the other warns that he's not fast enough to outrun their ferocious adversary. "I only have to outrun you," the quicker-thinking hiker responds. And so it is with the candidacy of Mitt Romney, whose acceptance speech Thursday at the Republican National Convention may not have been the touchdown the pundits claimed he needed but was surely what his handlers wanted, playing up both the candidate's strength (management experience)
NEWS
February 5, 2012
Martin O'Malley's greatest accomplishment as governor has been the elimination of taxes in Maryland. We now have "investments," "conversations," "sacrifices," "choices" - and duplicity, hypocrisy, sanctimony, and Orwellian perversion of language. But no taxes. Furthermore, in Governor O'Malley's parallel universe, you can "cut" expenditures of money that the state never had and never budgeted, and thereby generate "savings" all the way to infinity - even as he lays plans to confiscate more and more of the people's money.
EXPLORE
By Diane Brown, dmbrown@comcast.net | September 12, 2011
In my parallel universe - the one that still sustains me in hope, the one where fear is rarely a thought - the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are over and done, and the young man from Missouri who sat next to me on a plane would be more charitable about his parents, whom he called "hippies," because they oppose America's two current wars. He enlisted in the army while he was in college, and now he's on his way to Afghanistan, as soon as he finishes 10 days of training at Fort Meade.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: RANNYGAZOO Either you are charmed by P.G.Wodehouse's parallel universe of Edwardian flippancy or you are not, and if you are not, this is the place to step off. Rannygazoo , (pronounced ran-ee-ga-ZOO) it turns out, is not a piece of Edwardian slang, but a solid Americanism from the late nineteenth century that Wodehouse gleefully lifted, as Michael Quinion explored at World Wide Words . It means, Mr. Quinion explains, "a deceptive story or scheme, pranks, tricks or other irritating or foolish carryings-on," the last sense being utterly Wodehousian.
NEWS
January 19, 2003
BILLIE HOLIDAY called Baltimore a tough town. Frank Zappa moved away at the age of 10 and never came back. Edgar Allan Poe died here. John Wilkes Booth is buried here. But John Waters? John Waters, the one-time Pope of Trash, thrives on the place, and Baltimore's better off on account of it. Until last August, Baltimore's principal claim to fame for the year 2002 was that it led the league in Wheels Falling Off Buses. But then Hair- spray opened on Broadway and became a big hit - the biggest hit of the season - and suddenly there was a national spotlight shining down on a raucous, big-hearted, cross-dressing, mashed-potato-dancing version of the city's hidden, happy self.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
There's an old joke about two hikers in the woods encountering an angry bear. When one turns to run, the other warns that he's not fast enough to outrun their ferocious adversary. "I only have to outrun you," the quicker-thinking hiker responds. And so it is with the candidacy of Mitt Romney, whose acceptance speech Thursday at the Republican National Convention may not have been the touchdown the pundits claimed he needed but was surely what his handlers wanted, playing up both the candidate's strength (management experience)
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | May 9, 1994
MOSTLY HARMLESS. By Douglas Adams. Harmony Books. 277 pages. $20.DOUGLAS Adams' 15 minutes of fame as the author of the "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" series came to a close years ago. Why, then, should he suddenly add another installment to the humor/sci-fi story when he's moved on to more ambitious projects?After reading "Mostly Harmless," the series' fifth book, it seems plausible that Mr. Adams simply needs the money. Although the book definitely has its moments, Adams has apparently grown bored and cynical about the entire concept.
NEWS
February 5, 2012
Martin O'Malley's greatest accomplishment as governor has been the elimination of taxes in Maryland. We now have "investments," "conversations," "sacrifices," "choices" - and duplicity, hypocrisy, sanctimony, and Orwellian perversion of language. But no taxes. Furthermore, in Governor O'Malley's parallel universe, you can "cut" expenditures of money that the state never had and never budgeted, and thereby generate "savings" all the way to infinity - even as he lays plans to confiscate more and more of the people's money.
EXPLORE
By Diane Brown, dmbrown@comcast.net | September 12, 2011
In my parallel universe - the one that still sustains me in hope, the one where fear is rarely a thought - the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are over and done, and the young man from Missouri who sat next to me on a plane would be more charitable about his parents, whom he called "hippies," because they oppose America's two current wars. He enlisted in the army while he was in college, and now he's on his way to Afghanistan, as soon as he finishes 10 days of training at Fort Meade.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Peter Schmuck Edward Lee and Peter Schmuck and Edward Lee and Peter Schmuck Edward Lee and Peter Schmuck,Sun Reporters | February 4, 2007
The world may be watching when the Indianapolis Colts and Chicago Bears hook up tonight in the Super Bowl, but only because the football gods fumbled the matchup that everybody really wanted to see. OK, not everybody, but everybody who counts. Ravens fans were geared up for glory, and the rest of the country (with a couple of notable metropolitan exceptions) wanted to see the New Orleans Saints complete their unlikely march to Miami. Who would have gone home with the Lombardi Trophy? Who knows, but an Internet site called WhatIFSports.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 21, 2005
THERE IS A great deal of angst in the world of journalism about the possibility that the Internet will eventually make an entire generation of newspaper writers and editors obsolete, but I have good news. I've recently become a regular reader of a couple of high-profile athlete Web sites and I am here to tell you that you still need me. Here's a sample of the insightful prose you'll get if you log on to terrell owens.com: Terrell will return to camp and continue to display the work ethic, and on-the-field dedication that has made him one of the world's most elite athletes.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2004
It's not set in a particular period or place, nor is it quite contemporary, yet it looks oddly if fantastically familiar, like the more vividly stylized fragments of a vaguely remembered dream. A parallel universe. That's what the production designer and set decorator of Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events were going for, a parallel universe, one that that subverts time, location and place. A universe they describe as "Victorian expressionism." It's also a universe that recalls the magic and inventiveness of The Wizard of Oz or the '40s Technicolor extravaganzas such as The Pirate and Yolanda and the Thief of director Vincente Minnelli.
NEWS
January 19, 2003
BILLIE HOLIDAY called Baltimore a tough town. Frank Zappa moved away at the age of 10 and never came back. Edgar Allan Poe died here. John Wilkes Booth is buried here. But John Waters? John Waters, the one-time Pope of Trash, thrives on the place, and Baltimore's better off on account of it. Until last August, Baltimore's principal claim to fame for the year 2002 was that it led the league in Wheels Falling Off Buses. But then Hair- spray opened on Broadway and became a big hit - the biggest hit of the season - and suddenly there was a national spotlight shining down on a raucous, big-hearted, cross-dressing, mashed-potato-dancing version of the city's hidden, happy self.
TOPIC
June 20, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- There's a great sense of relief here now that Yugoslavia has accepted NATO's terms for a halt in the bombing and has withdrawn its forces from Kosovo.For the first time in weeks, young men who feared being drafted into the army have come out of hiding.No one is mentioning Kosovo at this moment. Suddenly, one no longer hears "We will not give up Kosovo!" The illusion of Kosovo as "the soul and the heart" of Serbia, without which there is no life, turned out to be a myth.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 21, 2005
THERE IS A great deal of angst in the world of journalism about the possibility that the Internet will eventually make an entire generation of newspaper writers and editors obsolete, but I have good news. I've recently become a regular reader of a couple of high-profile athlete Web sites and I am here to tell you that you still need me. Here's a sample of the insightful prose you'll get if you log on to terrell owens.com: Terrell will return to camp and continue to display the work ethic, and on-the-field dedication that has made him one of the world's most elite athletes.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 3, 2001
It's daring, but is it wise? It seems like socially conscious television, but could it wind up being seen instead as an act of unrestrained ego? Those are the kinds of questions that greet the return of The West Wing tonight with a special episode written by creator Aaron Sorkin in response to terrorist attacks on America Sept. 11. NBC has chosen neither to make the episode available for preview nor to offer many specifics. But, given the enormity of the events to which it promises to speak and the incredible risk Sorkin and NBC are taking with one of America's most beloved series, a little context couldn't hurt.
TOPIC
June 20, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- There's a great sense of relief here now that Yugoslavia has accepted NATO's terms for a halt in the bombing and has withdrawn its forces from Kosovo.For the first time in weeks, young men who feared being drafted into the army have come out of hiding.No one is mentioning Kosovo at this moment. Suddenly, one no longer hears "We will not give up Kosovo!" The illusion of Kosovo as "the soul and the heart" of Serbia, without which there is no life, turned out to be a myth.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.