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BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ and MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ,(Michael J. Himowitz is a columnist for The Baltimore Sun.) | September 14, 1992
Adding a disk drive, tape backup unit or network adapter card to your PC can be a daunting job, particularly if you don't like the idea of taking your computer apart.Even if you don't mind fooling with the hardware, you may be stymied if you have a small-footprint machine without an extra drive bay, or if you don't have an extra expansion slot for the controller board.Fortunately, manufacturers have come up with simple alternatives -- external devices that connect to your printer's parallel port, the same port the printer uses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2002
I was swept away with delight at the sheer speed of the latest external CD-writing device from MicroSolutions Inc., the longtime leader in drives that connect to PCs by way of the parallel port. The Backpack Triple Play includes cables and software to connect to PCs by way of the new ultra-fast USB 2.0 ports. The new ports are at least 40 times faster than the current USB and parallel ports. Since computers still do not come with USB 2.0 ports, buyers will need to acquire a USB 2.0 PCI card to get this feature.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | July 20, 1998
Take a look at the back of your computer some time. It can be pretty intimidating. I count no fewer than 13 cables protruding from mine - and naturally they're all tangled up in a clotted mess behind the machine. Half the time, I can't remember which one goes where, and I plugged every one of them in myself.Now I'll admit I'm a bit more wired than the average user. But can certainly sympathize with the computer owner who wrote to say that he was confused by advertisements for gadgets that are supposed to plug into various ports on the back of his machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | September 10, 2001
MY OLD FRIEND Dudley is an accomplished lawyer, gourmet cook, world traveler, raconteur and an enthusiastic, if not technically oriented computer user. He also tries to solve problems himself before he seeks help, so when he asks a question, I take it seriously. "I'd appreciate it if someone would demystify the ports on a computer," he wrote recently. "Why the differences? What do the differences mean? How do you identify which types you have and what do you want for each type of add-on device?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2002
I was swept away with delight at the sheer speed of the latest external CD-writing device from MicroSolutions Inc., the longtime leader in drives that connect to PCs by way of the parallel port. The Backpack Triple Play includes cables and software to connect to PCs by way of the new ultra-fast USB 2.0 ports. The new ports are at least 40 times faster than the current USB and parallel ports. Since computers still do not come with USB 2.0 ports, buyers will need to acquire a USB 2.0 PCI card to get this feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | October 26, 1998
When I wrote a piece about printer problems a couple of weeks ago, I didn't realize I was opening a floodgate. Tales of woe piled in from readers, neighbors, friends and colleagues who had trouble getting their printers to work.Many of these cries for help came from folks who were trying to gang up a printer, scanner, Zip drive and other gadgets on a single parallel port. I wish I could solve all of these problems - in fact, I wish I could solve all of my own printer hassles. But I can offer a couple of suggestions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | June 1, 1998
$200 ViCam camera for PC monitors offers superb imageThe ViCam is a nifty new $200 monitor camera from Vista Imaging. It's a rectilinear dark gray little fella with a convex top. It has a broad solid base, which gives it a solid foundation on your monitor and a high degree of swivel, allowing you to aim and shoot as needed.The quality of ViCam images is superb. The camera will work on any PC from a 386 on up, but lower-speed processors cramp the resolution and refresh rate. You can get up to 30 frames per second on a fast Pentium machine using the computer's enhanced parallel port (EPP)
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 31, 1999
Five years ago, parents and kids battled over who got to use the family computer and when. Today, the kids are likely to have their own PC, but the battles are still going on -- this time it's over who gets to use the Internet and the fancy color printer.Enter home networking, one of the hottest technologies to emerge this year. Networks allow users to share their disk drives, printers and Internet connections, but until now, they've required wiring that most homes don't have, as well as a certified geek to keep them running.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | September 10, 2001
MY OLD FRIEND Dudley is an accomplished lawyer, gourmet cook, world traveler, raconteur and an enthusiastic, if not technically oriented computer user. He also tries to solve problems himself before he seeks help, so when he asks a question, I take it seriously. "I'd appreciate it if someone would demystify the ports on a computer," he wrote recently. "Why the differences? What do the differences mean? How do you identify which types you have and what do you want for each type of add-on device?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 21, 1999
I/O Magic takes color scanning on road with MobileScanI/O Magic's MobileScan, the first portable color scanner with a rechargeable battery pack, is one neat gadget for your laptop.It's a sheet-fed scanner, meaning that documents or photos are fed onto transport rollers that move them across the scan heads. From there, images are transferred to your computer.The $199 MobileScan has a resolution of 300 dots per inch and worked great, with a standard TWAIN interface that allows it to function within programs such as Adobe Photoshop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 21, 1999
I/O Magic takes color scanning on road with MobileScanI/O Magic's MobileScan, the first portable color scanner with a rechargeable battery pack, is one neat gadget for your laptop.It's a sheet-fed scanner, meaning that documents or photos are fed onto transport rollers that move them across the scan heads. From there, images are transferred to your computer.The $199 MobileScan has a resolution of 300 dots per inch and worked great, with a standard TWAIN interface that allows it to function within programs such as Adobe Photoshop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 31, 1999
Five years ago, parents and kids battled over who got to use the family computer and when. Today, the kids are likely to have their own PC, but the battles are still going on -- this time it's over who gets to use the Internet and the fancy color printer.Enter home networking, one of the hottest technologies to emerge this year. Networks allow users to share their disk drives, printers and Internet connections, but until now, they've required wiring that most homes don't have, as well as a certified geek to keep them running.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | October 26, 1998
When I wrote a piece about printer problems a couple of weeks ago, I didn't realize I was opening a floodgate. Tales of woe piled in from readers, neighbors, friends and colleagues who had trouble getting their printers to work.Many of these cries for help came from folks who were trying to gang up a printer, scanner, Zip drive and other gadgets on a single parallel port. I wish I could solve all of these problems - in fact, I wish I could solve all of my own printer hassles. But I can offer a couple of suggestions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | July 20, 1998
Take a look at the back of your computer some time. It can be pretty intimidating. I count no fewer than 13 cables protruding from mine - and naturally they're all tangled up in a clotted mess behind the machine. Half the time, I can't remember which one goes where, and I plugged every one of them in myself.Now I'll admit I'm a bit more wired than the average user. But can certainly sympathize with the computer owner who wrote to say that he was confused by advertisements for gadgets that are supposed to plug into various ports on the back of his machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | June 1, 1998
$200 ViCam camera for PC monitors offers superb imageThe ViCam is a nifty new $200 monitor camera from Vista Imaging. It's a rectilinear dark gray little fella with a convex top. It has a broad solid base, which gives it a solid foundation on your monitor and a high degree of swivel, allowing you to aim and shoot as needed.The quality of ViCam images is superb. The camera will work on any PC from a 386 on up, but lower-speed processors cramp the resolution and refresh rate. You can get up to 30 frames per second on a fast Pentium machine using the computer's enhanced parallel port (EPP)
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ and MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ,(Michael J. Himowitz is a columnist for The Baltimore Sun.) | September 14, 1992
Adding a disk drive, tape backup unit or network adapter card to your PC can be a daunting job, particularly if you don't like the idea of taking your computer apart.Even if you don't mind fooling with the hardware, you may be stymied if you have a small-footprint machine without an extra drive bay, or if you don't have an extra expansion slot for the controller board.Fortunately, manufacturers have come up with simple alternatives -- external devices that connect to your printer's parallel port, the same port the printer uses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dwight Silverman and Dwight Silverman,Houston Chronicle | March 22, 1999
Having some form of large, removable storage on a personal computer is becoming more and more crucial. Though it remains an important part of any PC, the standard 1.44-megabyte floppy drive no longer has the capacity for what many people are doing with their systems these days.The plummeting price of hardware has made removable storage much more affordable, in many different forms. However, there's not yet a defining standard that is as ubiquitous as the floppy, so you'll have to choose based on what's best for your needs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dwight Silverman and Dwight Silverman,Houston Chronicle | February 28, 2000
As more and more computer peripherals are released that use a Universal Serial Bus, or USB, port, I am more and more impressed with the technology. I've sworn off using the poky serial and cantankerous parallel ports forever. So should you. As the year goes on, you'll see more computers that don't even have these "legacy" connections. There are quite a few already, including Dell Computer Corp.'s Web PC and Compaq Computer Corp.'s iPaq and Presario EZ 2200. Folks who buy these computers will need to get printers, scanners and other components that have a USB connection.
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