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NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | April 1, 1992
A story that appeared in the April 1 Evening Sun failed to make clear that Marian Scarinzi's lawsuit against Docktor Pet Center at White Marsh Mall seeks damages resulting from an illness she says she contracted from a parakeet bought at the store. The Evening Sun regrets the error.How much would you pay for a dead parakeet?A Rossville woman, who contends her colorful pet bird dropped dead prematurely, says it's worth $100,000. She has filed suit against the pet store that sold it to her.Marian Scarinzi doesn't want to talk about the death of her parakeet, but, in the suit filed March 20 in Baltimore County Circuit Court, she charges that she suffered physical pain and emotional anguish caused by its death.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Pictures taken by Sun photographers in 2007 reflected a year of trial for America, from the continuing conflict in Iraq to the tragic shootings at Virginia Tech to plagues of murder, dog-fighting and drugs in Baltimore. But their images also offered joy and hope. Throughout this section, we offer a sampling of the best of them. HAPPY DAYS Photograph by Chiaki Kawajiri Twins Jay and Sean Coble take a bath together at home. The pair spent time in foster care before being adopted by Maureen Shanklin, a remarkable woman who is raising 16 children, 14 of them adopted.
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NEWS
By Maya Bell and Maya Bell,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 17, 2004
MIAMI - Demolish their nests, they build them back. Bombard them with lasers, noise or stink bombs, they shrug. Hang scarecrow predators in their midst, they ignore them. So far, nothing but poison gas has dissuaded the monk parakeet, the state's most prolific and rapidly growing exotic species, from building its giant condo-style nests on power lines and high-voltage substations - a habit that occasionally triggers outages. After spending nearly $300,000 to encourage the lime-green urbanites to take up residence elsewhere, Florida's largest utility is scratching its collective corporate head.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 28, 2007
There was a pretty good crowd for yesterday's intrasquad game at Fort Lauderdale Stadium, though it's hard to hear anything over the nonstop squawking of the scores of green parakeets that have nested in the overhangs and light standards of the old ballpark. It sounds more like an Alfred Hitchcock movie than a baseball game. No species of parakeet is indigenous to Florida, but parakeet populations are booming here and in the southwestern states. The most common here is the monk parakeet, which builds the kind of large twig nests that are evident in the upper reaches of the Orioles' spring training home.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 28, 2007
There was a pretty good crowd for yesterday's intrasquad game at Fort Lauderdale Stadium, though it's hard to hear anything over the nonstop squawking of the scores of green parakeets that have nested in the overhangs and light standards of the old ballpark. It sounds more like an Alfred Hitchcock movie than a baseball game. No species of parakeet is indigenous to Florida, but parakeet populations are booming here and in the southwestern states. The most common here is the monk parakeet, which builds the kind of large twig nests that are evident in the upper reaches of the Orioles' spring training home.
NEWS
April 3, 1992
A story that appeared in the April 1 Evening Sun failed to make clear that Marian Scarinzi's lawsuit against Docktor Pet Center at White Marsh Mall seeks damages resulting from an illness she says she contracted from a parakeet bought at the store. The Evening Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | February 7, 1994
When his 9-month-old cinnamon green budgerigar won the All American competition last September against 767 other Australian parakeets from around the country, Ronald Rebhan knew he'd finally made it to the top."Winning the All American was one of the best thrills of my life," the Finksburg bird breeder said. "It's like winning the Super Bowl. It takes a lot of luck and you've got to have the right bird."And people really look up to you when you win that."With this top award, Mr. Rebhan can consider himself a true master breeder of this bird.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Pictures taken by Sun photographers in 2007 reflected a year of trial for America, from the continuing conflict in Iraq to the tragic shootings at Virginia Tech to plagues of murder, dog-fighting and drugs in Baltimore. But their images also offered joy and hope. Throughout this section, we offer a sampling of the best of them. HAPPY DAYS Photograph by Chiaki Kawajiri Twins Jay and Sean Coble take a bath together at home. The pair spent time in foster care before being adopted by Maureen Shanklin, a remarkable woman who is raising 16 children, 14 of them adopted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
The Flannigan family, in Colby Rodowsky's new novel for school-agers, Not Quite a Stranger (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 181 pages, $16), is about to increase. Standing on their front porch, ringing the doorbell, is Zachary Pearce, 17. He was living with his mother in Ohio; her death puts him on a bus for Baltimore, with a letter to hand to his never-seen-before father. Zach's parents, instead of marrying, had gone separate ways; the Flannigan household, unaware of Dad's one-night stand long ago, includes Dad, who has become a pediatrician, and his legal wife and their daughter and son. Will the family accept Zach (who noticeably resembles Dad)
NEWS
By Rachel V. Katz and Rachel V. Katz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 2000
MILFORD, Conn. - When Jeffrey McFadden was looking for a new home along the Connecticut coast, he found almost all the places he looked at offered an intriguing natural neighbor. Amid the robins, sparrows and cardinals traditional to New England were birds of an altogether different feather. Green. "Just about everywhere we looked, the birds were there," says McFadden. They were monk parakeets, and now he gets a steady stream of the sociable birds at the feeder in his front yard. "They're great to have around."
NEWS
By Maya Bell and Maya Bell,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 17, 2004
MIAMI - Demolish their nests, they build them back. Bombard them with lasers, noise or stink bombs, they shrug. Hang scarecrow predators in their midst, they ignore them. So far, nothing but poison gas has dissuaded the monk parakeet, the state's most prolific and rapidly growing exotic species, from building its giant condo-style nests on power lines and high-voltage substations - a habit that occasionally triggers outages. After spending nearly $300,000 to encourage the lime-green urbanites to take up residence elsewhere, Florida's largest utility is scratching its collective corporate head.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
The Flannigan family, in Colby Rodowsky's new novel for school-agers, Not Quite a Stranger (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 181 pages, $16), is about to increase. Standing on their front porch, ringing the doorbell, is Zachary Pearce, 17. He was living with his mother in Ohio; her death puts him on a bus for Baltimore, with a letter to hand to his never-seen-before father. Zach's parents, instead of marrying, had gone separate ways; the Flannigan household, unaware of Dad's one-night stand long ago, includes Dad, who has become a pediatrician, and his legal wife and their daughter and son. Will the family accept Zach (who noticeably resembles Dad)
NEWS
By Rachel V. Katz and Rachel V. Katz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 2000
MILFORD, Conn. - When Jeffrey McFadden was looking for a new home along the Connecticut coast, he found almost all the places he looked at offered an intriguing natural neighbor. Amid the robins, sparrows and cardinals traditional to New England were birds of an altogether different feather. Green. "Just about everywhere we looked, the birds were there," says McFadden. They were monk parakeets, and now he gets a steady stream of the sociable birds at the feeder in his front yard. "They're great to have around."
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | February 7, 1994
When his 9-month-old cinnamon green budgerigar won the All American competition last September against 767 other Australian parakeets from around the country, Ronald Rebhan knew he'd finally made it to the top."Winning the All American was one of the best thrills of my life," the Finksburg bird breeder said. "It's like winning the Super Bowl. It takes a lot of luck and you've got to have the right bird."And people really look up to you when you win that."With this top award, Mr. Rebhan can consider himself a true master breeder of this bird.
NEWS
April 3, 1992
A story that appeared in the April 1 Evening Sun failed to make clear that Marian Scarinzi's lawsuit against Docktor Pet Center at White Marsh Mall seeks damages resulting from an illness she says she contracted from a parakeet bought at the store. The Evening Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | April 1, 1992
A story that appeared in the April 1 Evening Sun failed to make clear that Marian Scarinzi's lawsuit against Docktor Pet Center at White Marsh Mall seeks damages resulting from an illness she says she contracted from a parakeet bought at the store. The Evening Sun regrets the error.How much would you pay for a dead parakeet?A Rossville woman, who contends her colorful pet bird dropped dead prematurely, says it's worth $100,000. She has filed suit against the pet store that sold it to her.Marian Scarinzi doesn't want to talk about the death of her parakeet, but, in the suit filed March 20 in Baltimore County Circuit Court, she charges that she suffered physical pain and emotional anguish caused by its death.
FEATURES
By Susan Campbell and Susan Campbell,HARTFORD COURANT | July 17, 2003
STRATFORD, Conn. - The cool evening mist doesn't penetrate the ground beneath this beech tree in Stratford. Near here, monk parakeets native to South America, the descendants of long-ago escapees, have built their intricate nests. This is a favorite walk of Stratford poet Norah Pollard. She enjoys the juxtaposition of craggy fishermen and women on a nearby dock and the delicate green birds meant for cages. The beech's trunk is covered with whirls and folds that look, says the poet, like body sex-parts.
TRAVEL
By Tom Uhlenbrock and Tom Uhlenbrock,St. Louis Post-Dispatch | May 16, 2004
Twenty years ago, Kevin Kelly ended his paid tour of Houmas House by tossing a quarter into a wishing well fashioned from a huge, sugar-cane syrup kettle. "I wished that one day I'd own a plantation," Kelly recalled. Wishes do come true. Kelly, a 48-year-old bachelor from New Orleans, has done well in shipping and real estate. Last May, he returned to Houmas House and bought the 21-room Greek Revival mansion in Darrow, La. Another of the grand old houses of the Deep South was saved.
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