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NEWS
September 30, 1995
Tom Horton's byline and a paragraph of introduction to his column, On the Bay, were dropped inadvertently in some editions of yesterday's Maryland section. The paragraph was from a solicitation for members by the newly formed Coastal Conservation Association of Maryland. It should have read: Squeaky wheels get grease. Can 500,000 sport anglers squeak loudly? You bet!The Sun regrets the error.
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NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Today begins my nineteenth year teaching copy editing at Loyola University Maryland (and, coincidentally, my twenty-seventh at The Baltimore Sun ). This post, the latest iteration of my first-day-of-class caution, is what the students in CM 361: Copy Editing, will be hearing in a few minutes.   It is only right, honorable, and just for me to tell you up front what you are in for. This is not a gut course. This is not an easy “A.” Some of you may be lucky to take home a “C” at semester's end. Writing is difficult.
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NEWS
May 27, 1996
In some editions yesterday, several words were left off the final paragraph of Michael Olesker's column. It should have read: Ten minutes out of childhood, the bunch of 'em, and there they were, preposterously reaching out for papers saying: We now declare you grown-ups all.Pub Date: 5/27/96
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | August 20, 2006
It's summertime and even public editors deserve to take a break, so here are some recent comments Paul Moore has received: Horse-race coverage Let me be upfront about a few things: I think The Sun has generally done a good job regarding the campaign coverage - I especially appreciate the Campaign Ad Watch feature; I am registered as a Republican and voted for the current governor in 2002; I have previously supported the mayor of Baltimore by voting for...
NEWS
July 31, 1995
An Associated Press story published in Thursday's Nation contained incorrect information on a Consumers Union report about the test failure of the Evenflo On My Way 206 child safety seat.The second paragraph of the story erroneously reported that the seat had failed the organization's tests when it was attached to its base. Actually, the failure occurred when the seat was not used with its detachable base.
NEWS
June 21, 1998
The last paragraph of Gregory Kane's column was incomplete in some editions yesterday. It should have read:Another young man said that cable channels -- particularly Ted Turner's TNT -- are begging for scripts with black dramatic themes. That's not surprising. Cable holds the answer to the media's pathetic portrayal of fathers in general and black fathers in particular.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/21/98
NEWS
June 8, 1998
The last line of an article on the Tony Awards was inadvertently omitted in yesterday's Arts & Society section. The final paragraph should have read:Twenty years from now, when your neighborhood dinner theater, community theater or high school stages "Ragtime," it will still be a great musical. But when -- or if -- they stage "The Lion King," it will still be a cartoon.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 6/08/98
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 27, 1990
Here is the text of a draft United Nations resolution on the use of force against Iraq:THE SECURITY COUNCIL, RECALLING AND REAFFIRMING its resolutions 660 (1990), 661 (1990), 662 (1990), 664 (1990), 665 (1990), 666 (1990), 667 (1990), 669 (1990), 670 (1990), 674 (1990), NOTING that, despite all efforts by the United Nations, Iraq refuses to comply with its obligation to implement Resolution 660 (1990) and subsequent resolutions, in flagrant contempt of the council, MINDFUL of its duties and responsibilities under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance and preservation of international peace and security, DETERMINED to secure full compliance with its decisions, ACTING under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,1.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | December 4, 2005
It's not surprising that newspaper readers tend to be more critical when they examine articles that touch on government and politics. After all, politics is something that we all are expected to have an opinion about. So political stories are frequently scrutinized for signs of bias or lack of balance, and readers sometimes think they find it. Occasionally, such conclusions are based on perceptive and objective analysis. In other instances, the readers' verdicts simply reflect whether their personal views were affirmed.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 10, 1994
CAIRO, Egypt -- The Vatican gave up its struggle yesterday to significantly weaken language on abortion in a United Nations plan to stabilize population growth, clearing the way for delegates to draft a compromise recognizing that abortions are performed worldwide.After a five-day standoff, delegates to the International Conference on Population and Development approved a paragraph stating that abortions "should be safe" in countries where the practice is legal.It was a significant setback for the Vatican, which had argued that there is no such thing as a "safe" abortion because it results in the death of a human life.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | December 4, 2005
It's not surprising that newspaper readers tend to be more critical when they examine articles that touch on government and politics. After all, politics is something that we all are expected to have an opinion about. So political stories are frequently scrutinized for signs of bias or lack of balance, and readers sometimes think they find it. Occasionally, such conclusions are based on perceptive and objective analysis. In other instances, the readers' verdicts simply reflect whether their personal views were affirmed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 2003
The Environmental Protection Agency is preparing to publish a draft report next week on the state of the environment, but after heavy editing by the White House, a long section describing risks from rising global temperatures has been whittled to a few noncommittal paragraphs. The report, commissioned in 2001 by the agency's administrator, Christie Whitman, was aimed at providing the first comprehensive review of what is known about various environmental problems, where gaps in understanding exist and how to fill them.
NEWS
By Kate Zernike and Kate Zernike,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 2002
DURHAM, N.C. - Like most other college students, Eric Rogers knows that submitting a term paper taken off the Internet is outright plagiarism, cause for suspension or a failing grade. What about using a paragraph? "Just a paragraph?" he said. Beneath a Duke cap worn backward, he pondered. "A big paragraph or a small paragraph?" "Taking a paragraph and changing words, I've done that before; it wasn't a big deal," he decided finally. "As long as I can manipulate it to be my words, change a few, it's not cheating."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 1, 2001
The fearless documentary "Paragraph 175," which screens tomorrow night at the Baltimore Jewish Film Festival, explores gay life in the Third Reich with a unique, sensual rigor. Filmmakers Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman combine survivor interviews with archival materials, arriving at an audio- visual impressionism that superbly balances tenderness and horror. "Paragraph 175" is named for the part of the German penal code condemning "an unnatural sex act committed between persons of male sex, or by humans with animals."
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2000
Ben Cole says with all seriousness that in his three decades as a mathematician at the National Security Agency he has never once seen the much-talked-about mad scientists rumored to scurry about the place. He says this even as he pulls on a sport coat he has worn since college, slips in a pocket protector so crammed full of pens it yanks his shirt pocket almost to his waist and then musses with his hair so that it sticks straight up off his head. But what makes Cole and dozens of his colleagues most resemble mad scientists is their passion for math and science, and their habit of jumping around a classroom, arms flailing, to share that passion with local students and teachers.
NEWS
June 21, 1998
The last paragraph of Gregory Kane's column was incomplete in some editions yesterday. It should have read:Another young man said that cable channels -- particularly Ted Turner's TNT -- are begging for scripts with black dramatic themes. That's not surprising. Cable holds the answer to the media's pathetic portrayal of fathers in general and black fathers in particular.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/21/98
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 12, 1994
The first thing they teach you in column-writing school is to avoid stating the obvious.As an example, unless it's a really, really, really slow news day, you resist the temptation to bang out pieces suggesting that motherhood is good or that spring inevitably follows winter.I thought the Singapore caning story fell into that category.The first paragraph says: Caning is bad.Second paragraph: There is no second paragraph.But then I'm listening to talk radio, something else I try to avoid because, if you're not careful, you could be assaulted by Rush Limbaugh, the benighted voice of right-wing politics and the Florida citrus industry.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Today begins my nineteenth year teaching copy editing at Loyola University Maryland (and, coincidentally, my twenty-seventh at The Baltimore Sun ). This post, the latest iteration of my first-day-of-class caution, is what the students in CM 361: Copy Editing, will be hearing in a few minutes.   It is only right, honorable, and just for me to tell you up front what you are in for. This is not a gut course. This is not an easy “A.” Some of you may be lucky to take home a “C” at semester's end. Writing is difficult.
NEWS
June 8, 1998
The last line of an article on the Tony Awards was inadvertently omitted in yesterday's Arts & Society section. The final paragraph should have read:Twenty years from now, when your neighborhood dinner theater, community theater or high school stages "Ragtime," it will still be a great musical. But when -- or if -- they stage "The Lion King," it will still be a cartoon.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 6/08/98
NEWS
May 27, 1996
In some editions yesterday, several words were left off the final paragraph of Michael Olesker's column. It should have read: Ten minutes out of childhood, the bunch of 'em, and there they were, preposterously reaching out for papers saying: We now declare you grown-ups all.Pub Date: 5/27/96
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