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By Peter Schmuck | March 27, 2010
There is something about spring training that always brings out the irrational optimist in me. I watch Brian Matusz beguile Albert Pujols and Matt Holliday on Wednesday afternoon and imagine him polishing his 2010 American League Rookie of the Year Award. I see Brad Bergesen pitch 5 2/3 innings of three-hit ball against the New York Yankees on Thursday and wonder why anybody was ever worried about his banged-up shin or his Screen Actors Guild shoulder injury. Every time I see Adam Jones track a fly ball or streak from first to third, I see a young Eric Davis, and if you remember Eric from his career in Cincinnati or his inspiring time in Baltimore, you know that's high praise.
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NEWS
By James P. Scanlan | August 5, 2013
On July 23, the Maryland State Board of Education preliminarily approved new public school discipline regulations aimed at generally reducing suspension rates as well as racial disparities in suspension rates. Public comment will be solicited on the proposed regulations, and the board will vote in early December. Concerns that minority students are suspended several times as often as whites have lately prompted a number of jurisdictions to consider relaxing discipline standards. The approach is consistent with a near-universal perception, promoted by the Departments of Education and Justice, that stringent discipline policies lead to large racial differences in discipline rates.
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NEWS
June 14, 2013
The op-ed pieces that are occasionally presented by local professors are eye opening, not for their insight but for their lack thereof. If professor Don Norris ("Flacco's contract shows America's skewed priorities," June 121) had taken an Economics 101 course, he would have certainly studied the paradox of value. In the Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith wrote, "The things which have the greatest value in use frequently have little or no value in exchange; on the contrary, those which have the greatest value in exchange frequently have little or no value in use. Nothing is more useful than water: but it will purchase scarce anything; scarce anything can be had in exchange for it. A diamond, on the contrary, has scarce any use-value; but a very great quantity of other goods may frequently be had in exchange for it. " Smith's solution to this apparent paradox was that the value in exchange of a thing is determined by its supply relative to its demand.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
The op-ed pieces that are occasionally presented by local professors are eye opening, not for their insight but for their lack thereof. If professor Don Norris ("Flacco's contract shows America's skewed priorities," June 121) had taken an Economics 101 course, he would have certainly studied the paradox of value. In the Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith wrote, "The things which have the greatest value in use frequently have little or no value in exchange; on the contrary, those which have the greatest value in exchange frequently have little or no value in use. Nothing is more useful than water: but it will purchase scarce anything; scarce anything can be had in exchange for it. A diamond, on the contrary, has scarce any use-value; but a very great quantity of other goods may frequently be had in exchange for it. " Smith's solution to this apparent paradox was that the value in exchange of a thing is determined by its supply relative to its demand.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
He is the baseball owner whose meddling has inspired years of fan griping, and the guy who wanted so badly to win, he lent more than $100 million from his personal fortune to cover his club's money losses. He is the controlling boss who ran through six top baseball executives in less than a decade, and the man who offered his private plane and doctor to help his second baseman through back trouble. He is the argumentative cuss who brusquely ended his friendship with a fellow civic leader, and the Baltimore kid who made good who gave $300,000 to keep the city's pools open this summer, insisting that he get no credit for the gesture.
NEWS
By Dennis Baron | September 7, 1993
THE French call it la rentree, or re-entry, as if it were a spaceship coming back to Earth. La rentree refers to the season when students of all ages shoulder their backpacks and begin another year of the paradox we call school.It's a paradox because school is an institution that is both universally admired and despised. We consider school vital to our individual and national well-being, while we vilify schools for failing to meet the needs of students and the nation.Of course, if we could define those needs more clearly we just might be able to figure out how schools could be more effective.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1999
Despite telling the public the club had canceled violence-prone Sunday night dance parties, the owners of Paradox nightclub near PSINet Stadium held another event Sunday, after which a patron was shot in the spine walking to his car.Two young men were returning from the club to their car parked in Lot B-1 of Orioles Park at Camden Yards on Russell Street when someone fired four or five shots at them about 2: 15 a.m., police said.One of the bullets hit Jason Baker, 18, of the 1900 block of Summit Ave. in Baltimore County, in the back, police said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1997
A razor-blade attack on the dance floor of a Southwest Baltimore after-hours club has left a Coppin State College student severely injured and has rekindled a debate on whether the controversial establishment should be closed.City police say the cutting that occurred early Saturday is the latest in a series of problems at Paradox Nightclub, which is just south of the new Ravens' stadium and this summer survived a police-backed bid by a neighborhood association to revoke its license."The only thing we can do now is kind of hope that we don't have something that leads to someone's death," said Maj. Elmer Dennis, commander of the Southern District police station.
NEWS
February 8, 2004
The percentage of Americans -- about 1 in 3 -- who describe themselves as "very happy" has remained about the same since the 1950s, even though the average person's income has doubled since that time. -- National Opinion Research Center and The Progress Paradox by Gregg Easterbrook (Random House, 2003)
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1999
A Naval Academy police officer moonlighting as a security guard at a Southwest Baltimore nightclub was grazed by a stray bullet early yesterday when gunfire erupted a block away.Detective Terry McCargo, 38, reported hearing gunshots about 2: 15 a.m. outside the Paradox nightclub in the 1300 block of Russell St., near PSINet Stadium, and took cover behind a telephone pole.Police said an errant bullet, apparently from a nearby group of men who were arguing, grazed McCargo's right forearm. McCargo, who has worked at the Naval Academy in Annapolis since 1985, was treated by paramedics at the scene.
NEWS
January 28, 2013
For critics of gun control, Maryland, and particularly Baltimore, are proof of the pointlessness and even dangerousness of seeking to make legal access to firearms more difficult. Maryland has some of the strictest gun control laws in the nation, particularly in Baltimore, yet it also has high rates of gun crime, especially in its largest city. Even those who are inclined to support gun control may ask what the point is of trying to tackle it on a state level. If Maryland is sandwiched between Pennsylvania and Virginia, with their relatively lax laws, does it make any difference if we enact stricter standards here?
NEWS
September 19, 2012
A hard truth about being Baltimore's mayor is that there is almost never a good time to declare progress. Whenever there is good news to report, it will almost inevitably collide with a fresh tragedy. That's what happened to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake this week, when she pointed to the city's success in drawing crowds to a series of major public events downtown - despite warnings this spring from a pair of Baltimore County lawmakers that people should stay away in the wake of high-profile incidents of violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
At 2 a.m. last Saturday, small clusters of people - young, old, black, white, suburbanites and city dwellers - made their way to a cavernous warehouse underneath the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. It was the same excursion thousands of others have made over the past 21 years to the Paradox, the 13,000-square-foot renovated warehouse in the outskirts of Baltimore. The club, alongside Club Fantasy (since closed) and Club Choices, is where B-more Club music, the furiously aggressive strain of hip-hop and house, was cultivated and finessed - where DJs K-Swift and Ultra Nate got started.
NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 12, 2012
One of my favorite activities this primary season is to read the seemingly endless analyses of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich. The profiles run the gamut from glowing to scathing; just about every Washington pundit has a strong opinion of "Mr. Speaker. " Yet, most of the talking heads have not worked with the man or known him very well. I have worked with Newt, consider him a friend, but also understand the eccentricities of this fascinating leader. (I am also Maryland chairman of Mitt Romney's presidential campaign.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
The Paradox, the sprawling dance club near M&T Bank Stadium, will close temporarily for renovations in January. The club will close the third weekend in January for four to five weeks, said promoter Lisa Suit. It plans on upgrading the sound system, DJ booth, and adding new seating, an outside deck, and a lounge area. The club will still host parties until late January, including a recently announced dance marathon January 14. The party is in honor of the 20th anniversary of Murk, the Miami house music production team that has had several hits on the Billboard dance charts.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
He is the baseball owner whose meddling has inspired years of fan griping, and the guy who wanted so badly to win, he lent more than $100 million from his personal fortune to cover his club's money losses. He is the controlling boss who ran through six top baseball executives in less than a decade, and the man who offered his private plane and doctor to help his second baseman through back trouble. He is the argumentative cuss who brusquely ended his friendship with a fellow civic leader, and the Baltimore kid who made good who gave $300,000 to keep the city's pools open this summer, insisting that he get no credit for the gesture.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | February 19, 2008
Two 20-year-old men were shot - one fatally - during a dispute about 2:40 a.m. yesterday at a parking lot near the Paradox Nightclub in South Baltimore, police said. Authorities have not identified the person who died. The other victim was taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and was being treated for injuries that are not life-threatening, police said. On Sunday night, Paradox hosted an "all high school party," according to a voice recording. The doors opened at 9 p.m. and closed at 2 a.m. Police said security officers from the nightclub contacted them about closing time because the crowd was getting rowdy and there was fighting.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 7, 2010
It is the enduring paradox of our centuries here. It is the paradox that stood its ground at Bunker Hill, made a doomed charge on Fort Wagner, stormed San Juan Hill, advanced through the Meuse-Argonne, landed on Iwo Jima, liberated Seoul and was taken prisoner in Hanoi. It is the paradox: Black men, will you defend America? Leave skin and blood in foreign lands fighting for ideals that do not include you? Ideals like, "We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal."
NEWS
June 2, 2010
The Supreme Court this week took another step back from its 1969 Miranda ruling, which requires police to notify criminal suspects of their right to remain silent when questioned. In a bizarre opinion by the court's conservative majority, the justices ruled 5-4 that unless a suspect explicitly invokes his right not to talk — that is, unless he talks to the police — he's not entitled to remain silent, and any statement he makes can be used against him in court. This paradoxical interpretation of the law, as Justice Sonia Sotomayor pointed out in her first major dissent since joining the court, "turns Miranda upside down" and "bodes poorly for the fundamental principles that Miranda protects."
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