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NEWS
February 11, 2005
IT WAS ONE of the first schools in the nation to provide a special place for teenagers who were pregnant or who had already given birth. It has succeeded in keeping these young women in school through a combination of small classes, close personal attention, focus on studies and day care for their babies. Now some of the special qualities of the Laurence G. Paquin Middle/High School are on the chopping block because of budget cuts imposed by the Baltimore school system. Consequently, a 17-year-old pregnant senior who came to Paquin in January looking to take a science class that she needed for graduation, to take one example, was one of about a dozen students the school has had to turn away.
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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sara.neufeld@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
Despite public protests and predictions of escalated violence, the Baltimore school board voted Tuesday night to close six schools this summer and a seventh next year, triggering a major reorganization of the system. The board voted to close William H. Lemmel Middle, Harriet Tubman Elementary, Samuel Banks High, Thurgood Marshall High, Homeland Security Academy and George Kelson Elementary/Middle this summer, and to close Paul Laurence Dunbar Middle in the summer of 2010. William Pinderhughes Elementary will move into the building now occupied by Kelson and absorb its student population.
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NEWS
November 28, 2006
On November 26, 2006, RAYMOND A. PAQUIN SR., beloved husband of the late Therese M. (nee Gauvin); loving father of Susan M. Baldwin, Michele A. Beecher, Raymond A. Paquin, Jr. and Robert K. Paquin; cherished grandfather of eleven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Our lady of Hope Catholic Church, Thursday, 10 A.M. Interment Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery. A Christian Wake Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk Inc., 7922 'Wise Avenue, Wednesday, 4:30 P.M. Friends may call Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sara.neufeld@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
Staff and parents at failing schools slated for closure said at a hearing Saturday that they wished their schools had been given the resources to succeed before being shut down. About 50 people, a few dozen of them school system administrators required to attend, turned out for the second and final hearing on a major school reorganization plan that is subject to an April 28 vote by the board of education. Some speakers complained that the hearings were held at inconvenient locations for residents of the west side, where many of the changes would occur.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 30, 1997
Alfre Woodard and Anna Paquin (a Best Supporting Actress Oscar-winner for "The Piano") shine in one of USA's best made-for-cable movies to date, an adaptation of Carson McCullers' novel "Member of the Wedding" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., USA).The story pits Paquin's character, a 12-year-old Georgia girl, against the world she's been brought up in. The girl can't decide whether she's a beauty (as her family suggests) or a freak who belongs in a circus. When her brother gets married, she decides the only thing to do is get out of town by leaving with him on his honeymoon, an idea that meets with a predictably cool reception.
NEWS
October 16, 1991
Lois E. White, retired principal of Laurence G. Paquin Junior Senior High School, died Friday of cancer at Sinai Hospital. She lived on Hawksbury Road in Pikesville.A mass of Christian burial for Mrs. White, 65, was being offered today at Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Church, Liberty Heights Avenue and Edgewood Street.She retired in 1980 as principal of the school for pregnant girls, where she had worked since 1971. She started teaching in Baltimore schools in 1949.After retiring, she worked for a year with a consulting group in Washington evaluating programs for unmarried teen-age mothers.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
City school officials said yesterday they stand by their decision to reduce the number of teachers and aides at Laurence G. Paquin Middle/High, the city's school for pregnant girls and young mothers. Supporters of the East Baltimore school have argued that the staff reductions - part of budget cuts implemented systemwide as a result of last year's budget crisis - have devastated the school by causing programs and classes to be canceled. As a result, enrollment has declined, according to the school's principal.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
Three months into her tenure as America's physician, Surgeon General M. Joycelyn Elders said she found in Baltimore the future of health care for the nation's exploding population of teen-age mothers.During a brisk tour yesterday of the Laurence Paquin School, Dr. Elders told an admiring audience of students and staff that they should "pat themselves on the back" for doing the right thing about a problem that ranks highest on her agenda.She said the school, which educates about 300 new and expectant mothers in the sixth through 12th grades, teaches responsibility while keeping a firm grasp on the inescapable realities of inner-city life.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | May 8, 1993
In what has become a Baltimore tradition, tears flowed freely yesterday at the Laurence G. Paquin School's 13th annual salute to mothers.The day is not for the mothers and mothers-to-be who attend the Northeast Baltimore school, but for their mothers or mother surrogates -- grandmothers, aunts, teachers.Over the years, the event's reputation has evolved to the point where people come to watch the weeping, and shed a few tears themselves.Like fans at a beloved, three-handkerchief movie, the audience of family members and friends applauded those who broke down, and murmured approvingly at each hug or embrace.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | November 11, 1990
Something about Rosetta Stith suggests determination, ego, passion and theatrics rolled into one -- as though she were a grand dame of the opera or a Shakespearean actress.And perhaps in another life she would be. "My whole upbringinwas to go into the theater. My parents always thought I would be on stage," she says with a sweeping gesture.Almost all her gestures are.Nonetheless, the West Baltimore native is neither diva noactress: She is in her 10th year as the principal of Baltimore's Laurence G. Paquin Junior-Senior High School for pregnant teen-agers and new mothers.
NEWS
June 6, 2007
Boys track Performer of the Year Zach Roth Franklin The senior proved to be one of the area's most versatile performers. He won the Class 3A state title in the discus and also took fifth in the 800 meters. That came one week after he was second in both the 800 and discus at the regional meet, where Roth also won the shot put. Coaches of the Year Chris McGuines and Gerard Filosa Pikesville After a strong indoor season, the Panthers kept on rolling outdoors under McGuines and Filosa.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 23, 2007
TONIGHT HBO presents its premiere screening of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee based on Dee Alexander's 1970 best-seller about the brutal displacement of Native Americans in the late 19th century. Aidan Quinn, Adam Beach, August Schellenberg and Anna Paquin star in the film. (Miss Paquin, who won an Oscar for The Piano in 1994 at age 12, has avoided the pitfalls of too much, too soon. She thrives, quietly.) The premiere happens at the American Museum of Natural History on NYC's West Side.
NEWS
November 28, 2006
On November 26, 2006, RAYMOND A. PAQUIN SR., beloved husband of the late Therese M. (nee Gauvin); loving father of Susan M. Baldwin, Michele A. Beecher, Raymond A. Paquin, Jr. and Robert K. Paquin; cherished grandfather of eleven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Our lady of Hope Catholic Church, Thursday, 10 A.M. Interment Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery. A Christian Wake Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk Inc., 7922 'Wise Avenue, Wednesday, 4:30 P.M. Friends may call Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
Twelve years have passed since Anna Paquin won an Oscar for her first film role, as the angry, petulant daughter of a 19th-century mail-order bride in Jane Campion's The Piano. And for six years, she's been a key player in the highly successful X-Men movies as Rogue, a mutant with the power to drain a person's life force away simply by touching them. But still, this whole fame thing really doesn't sit well with her. She loves the work of being an actor, but finds some of the ancillary stuff puzzling, if not downright irritating.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | March 20, 2006
The classrooms are filled with desks, some with computers, too, but day after day many of those rooms go unused. Here's where pregnant girls and teen mothers used to learn about business education and science. Now, only half of the nursery's cribs are filled with infants. Laurence G. Paquin Middle/High School in East Baltimore has had its staff cut nearly in half in the past year because of system budget cuts. Teachers say staff cuts led to dwindling enrollment. And now that the facility on Sinclair Lane has excess space, city school officials want to give the building to another school and move Paquin to the nearby Lake Clifton High complex.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
Supporters of Laurence G. Paquin Middle/High School for pregnant teens and young mothers urged a City Council committee last night to use its influence to undo staff cuts imposed there by the Baltimore school system. Speakers, including teachers, physicians and a former city school board member, had different reasons for supporting the East Baltimore school. Some argued that Paquin fills a social need as a place where pregnant girls are educated and the cycle of teen motherhood and poverty can be broken.
NEWS
By Eileen Canzian and Eileen Canzian,Staff Writer | May 9, 1992
Looking smart in a crisp white and navy sheath, Nakia Stephens strode to the stage of her high school auditorium and invited her mother to join her. Nakia spoke with confidence as she introduced Delores Stephens to the audience. Then Nakia, 17, faced her mother and prepared to recite a thank-you speech.Instead, she burst into tears. "Mom, I really love you," Nakia finally managed through sobs, her face buried in the older woman's arms. Her mother, too, was crying.There were many moments like that, and many tissues, as Baltimore's Paquin School held it's annual Mother's Day celebration yesterday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 22, 1994
Tommy Lee Jones won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his performance as a federal marshal pursuing escaped convict Harrison Ford in "The Fugitive" at the 66th Annual Academy Awards last night.And, in a stunning upset, 11-year-old Anna Paquin won the Best Supporting Actress Award for her role as the daughter of a mail-order bride in Jane Campion's "The Piano."Ms. Paquin's eyes lit up with amazement when she heard her name. The actress, who said earlier she had not prepared a speech because she doubted she would win, gasped for breath and stood trembling for a few seconds after being handed her statuette, then rushed through a series of "thank yous."
NEWS
February 13, 2005
Why does state choose leaders of local schools? I applaud the efforts of some Baltimore County state senators to change the process for appointing school board members ("County school board bill debated," Feb. 10). However, the more fundamental question is not which state officials should choose school members, but why state government should play any role at all. During my time as the Baltimore County executive's education liaison, I cannot tell you how many seemingly informed citizens told me that they thought the county executive ran the school system.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
City school officials said yesterday they stand by their decision to reduce the number of teachers and aides at Laurence G. Paquin Middle/High, the city's school for pregnant girls and young mothers. Supporters of the East Baltimore school have argued that the staff reductions - part of budget cuts implemented systemwide as a result of last year's budget crisis - have devastated the school by causing programs and classes to be canceled. As a result, enrollment has declined, according to the school's principal.
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