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By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 16, 1991
PAPRIKA, known for its color, is more than just a decoration. This spice is frequently used throughout Europe and is considered the national spice of Hungary. When buying paprika, look for bright red color; brown is a sign of age. Paprika has a short shelf life and should be kept in the refrigerator.Creamy Chicken Paprika1 tablespoon olive or vegetable oil1 tablespoon margarine1 tablespoon chopped garlic1 small onion, chopped4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves, pounded thin2 cups water1/2 cup milk1 package noodles and Romanoff sauce1 4.5-ounce jar sliced mushrooms, drained1/2 teaspoon paprikaIn a 10-inch skillet, heat oil and margarine and cook garlic and onion over medium-high heat for 30 seconds.
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By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
My kitchen smells like pot, but there's nothing going on here to concern the Police Department. Maybe the Fire Department. I'm taking a gizmo that looks like a toy gun, stuffing wood shavings into the top and lighting them afire. My motivation is not pyromaniacal but gastronomical: getting the flavors of applewood, cherry, hickory and mesquite into foods that can't stand up to conventional smoking. Like salad greens. Soup. Goat cheese. Ice cream. The $99 Smoking Gun is a strange combination of high-tech and primal, a molecular gastronomy gadget that delivers a flavor known since cavemen first put woolly mammoth flesh to flame.
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FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 27, 2007
When good friends who live in Washington telephoned recently to say that they would be in town for several days, I immediately marked a date on the calendar when we could get together. Originally, I had thought that we might dine out, but while testing recipes this past week, I realized that a new dish I had been working on would make a perfect entree to serve four. That recipe was for sauteed scallops dusted in smoked paprika, served atop a mound of saffron and orange-scented couscous.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 1, 2008
I am exhausted by the demands of our New England winters. What I do to get over the late-winter blahs is entertain. Nothing fancy. In fact, this is the season when I pull out my comfort-food recipes and invite friends over for laid-back gatherings. Braised short ribs are quintessential comfort fare for this time of year. Rich and satisfying - yes, even fattening! Nothing is better on a cold winter day than short ribs cooked until they are falling off their bones. This recipe for barbecued short ribs was suggested to me by my friend Matt Sunderland, a talented chef in my area.
FEATURES
By John Anderson | September 14, 2007
The girl of your dreams -- and his dreams and her dreams -- the punkish heroine of Satoshi Kon's Paprika, is a double-agent-provocateur in a shape-shifting movie of marvelous, baffling complexities. It's a long way from the work of that Japanese Walt Disney, Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away). And it is also anime decidedly for adults: Among Paprika's thriller aspects, noirish angst and futuristic action, nothing is ever what it appears. Dreams intrude on dreams. Surfaces of reality fold over each other, like the petals on an origami chrysanthemum.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | August 15, 2007
Lately I've been cooking boneless pork chops in place of the ubiquitous chicken breast. All chicken, all the time - it just gets too boring. I like to rub the chops with a mixture of salt, pepper and that great flavorful smoked paprika from Spain called pimenton. The paprika is a great match for pork of any kind. After pan-frying the chops, I add a light glaze of barbecue sauce for a touch of sweetness. Sauteed sweet onions echo the flavor of the sauce for a great side dish. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 30, 2008
The nostalgic satisfaction of meatloaf eludes many of us during the busy workweek because the soul-soothing comfort food takes so darn long to bake. But what about meatballs instead? The form lends itself to limitless flavor combinations. This version gets a Spanish flair from smoked paprika, which provides great depth of flavor. The meatballs are simmered in a little red wine and tomato sauce. Choose an inexpensive Rioja to cook with to keep the theme going. Menu Smoked Paprika Turkey Meatballs Spanish rice Glazed carrots Flan Smoked Paprika Turkey Meatballs Serves 4 -- Total time: 35 minutes 1 pound ground dark turkey meat 1 egg 1/4 red onion, chopped very fine 1/4 cup dry bread crumbs 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon sweet or spicy smoked Spanish paprika 6 sprigs parsley, minced 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 can (15 ounces)
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | November 28, 1999
Liquid marinades made with citrus juice, vinegar or wine are marvelous for breaking down the muscle fiber in tougher cuts of meat and for adding flavor. But here's the rub: Delicate fish can disintegrate in acidic liquids, and naturally tender cuts of meat need only a flavor boost -- not tenderizing.A better technique for flavoring such foods is to treat them to a gentle massage with dried herbs and spices.By making your own herb-and-spice rubs, you can custom-mix blends for beef, pork, lamb or fish.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 15, 2004
We all love sandwiches made from leftover turkey or chicken, but when they grow boring I often turn to other, perhaps more inspiring, dishes. A paella is one solution. The traditional Spanish version includes seafood, sausage and chicken nestled in saffron rice. Here, I've speeded up the process by eliminating the sausage and seafood and using leftover turkey or chicken. Tips Spanish smoked paprika (pimenton; available in specialty or spice shops) works great in this dish, but Hungarian or regular paprika works well, too. Look for chopped onions and peppers in the supermarket's produce aisle.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | June 25, 1995
Old Bay offers a new lookIf the spice of your life is Old Bay, why not flaunt it? You can have the familiar red, yellow and blue label on a baseball cap, a beach towel, an apron, a T-shirt, a soup mug, golf balls, playing cards and more than a dozen other items in the Old Bay Bounty from the Bay line of merchandise from McCormick & Co. Prices range from $7.99 for the three Pinnacle golf balls to $99.99 for a 20-quart, stainless steel stock pot.For a...
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 30, 2008
The nostalgic satisfaction of meatloaf eludes many of us during the busy workweek because the soul-soothing comfort food takes so darn long to bake. But what about meatballs instead? The form lends itself to limitless flavor combinations. This version gets a Spanish flair from smoked paprika, which provides great depth of flavor. The meatballs are simmered in a little red wine and tomato sauce. Choose an inexpensive Rioja to cook with to keep the theme going. Menu Smoked Paprika Turkey Meatballs Spanish rice Glazed carrots Flan Smoked Paprika Turkey Meatballs Serves 4 -- Total time: 35 minutes 1 pound ground dark turkey meat 1 egg 1/4 red onion, chopped very fine 1/4 cup dry bread crumbs 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon sweet or spicy smoked Spanish paprika 6 sprigs parsley, minced 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 can (15 ounces)
FEATURES
By John Anderson | September 14, 2007
The girl of your dreams -- and his dreams and her dreams -- the punkish heroine of Satoshi Kon's Paprika, is a double-agent-provocateur in a shape-shifting movie of marvelous, baffling complexities. It's a long way from the work of that Japanese Walt Disney, Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away). And it is also anime decidedly for adults: Among Paprika's thriller aspects, noirish angst and futuristic action, nothing is ever what it appears. Dreams intrude on dreams. Surfaces of reality fold over each other, like the petals on an origami chrysanthemum.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | August 15, 2007
Lately I've been cooking boneless pork chops in place of the ubiquitous chicken breast. All chicken, all the time - it just gets too boring. I like to rub the chops with a mixture of salt, pepper and that great flavorful smoked paprika from Spain called pimenton. The paprika is a great match for pork of any kind. After pan-frying the chops, I add a light glaze of barbecue sauce for a touch of sweetness. Sauteed sweet onions echo the flavor of the sauce for a great side dish. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 27, 2007
When good friends who live in Washington telephoned recently to say that they would be in town for several days, I immediately marked a date on the calendar when we could get together. Originally, I had thought that we might dine out, but while testing recipes this past week, I realized that a new dish I had been working on would make a perfect entree to serve four. That recipe was for sauteed scallops dusted in smoked paprika, served atop a mound of saffron and orange-scented couscous.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 8, 2006
From the moment she first tasted the Roasted Eggplant and Tomato Salad I had prepared for a cooking class, my assistant was smitten. She loved the combination of colors -- the dark purple-hued eggplant paired with the bright red plum tomatoes. She liked the contrast of textures -- the softness of the roasted aubergine combined with the firmer plum tomatoes and the crunchy onions. But she was especially surprised by the unexpected spicy taste of the dressing, a mixture of lemon juice and robust seasonings of cumin, paprika and cayenne pepper.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 15, 2004
We all love sandwiches made from leftover turkey or chicken, but when they grow boring I often turn to other, perhaps more inspiring, dishes. A paella is one solution. The traditional Spanish version includes seafood, sausage and chicken nestled in saffron rice. Here, I've speeded up the process by eliminating the sausage and seafood and using leftover turkey or chicken. Tips Spanish smoked paprika (pimenton; available in specialty or spice shops) works great in this dish, but Hungarian or regular paprika works well, too. Look for chopped onions and peppers in the supermarket's produce aisle.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
Martin R. Karetski of Du Bois, Pa., requested a recipe for Hungarian Goulash. He wrote, "My mother made it some 50 years ago when I was younger. It may have had some bay leaves and cloves as some of the spices. Any help you can give will be appreciated." Mike Buus of Sioux Falls, S.D., responded with a recipe, which he notes "came from June Meyer's Authentic Hungarian Goulash Recipe index page, and I give her all the credit. I learned to make the dish from my grandmother and mother who were from Austria-Hungary.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 1, 2008
I am exhausted by the demands of our New England winters. What I do to get over the late-winter blahs is entertain. Nothing fancy. In fact, this is the season when I pull out my comfort-food recipes and invite friends over for laid-back gatherings. Braised short ribs are quintessential comfort fare for this time of year. Rich and satisfying - yes, even fattening! Nothing is better on a cold winter day than short ribs cooked until they are falling off their bones. This recipe for barbecued short ribs was suggested to me by my friend Matt Sunderland, a talented chef in my area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
On a recent weekday morning, the kitchens at the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation in Mount Vernon were jam packed with people. Women basted trays of chicken wings, slathering them in butter and seasoning them with lemon juice, garlic and paprika before the trays were whisked away and replaced by more. Men marched around in aprons, carrying pink potholders and joking about doing "women's work" in the kitchens. In the back room, trays containing about 10,000 freshly baked pastries were stacked up on carts, and thousands of stuffed grape leaves were sitting in the freezer.
NEWS
By William Rice and William Rice,Special to the Sun | April 7, 2002
Today the ever-expanding boundaries of comfort food include a dish that in recent years has been more talked about than eaten, except at truck stops. I refer to the chicken-fried steak, an inexpensive cut of beef that is coated in flour and fried until brown. Quick to cook and economical, it can be a treat. Or it can be tough, tired and weighed down by a pan gravy that has the texture and taste of wallpaper paste. There's no secret to success, really. If your steak is inexpensive, and it should be, it's going to be tough.
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