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Pappardelle

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By Gail Forman | August 18, 1991
When the zucchini come marching in -- as they do relentlessly every growing season -- it doesn't take long before the troops go on zucchini overload. So what if agriculturalists praise zucchini as a high-yield crop? They are only squash, after all, and what is a cook supposed to do with so many of them?Years ago I found a delicious answer at a late-night dinner at the Union Square Cafe in New York. I wanted to eat something light and the waiter suggested a low-calorie pasta substitute called pappardelle of zucchini, named after the broad noodle Tuscan chefs pair with game.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Bartlett Pear Inn is the name of Alice and Jordan Lloyd's boutique inn on Harrison Street in Easton. It's also the name of their wonderful-in-every-way restaurant on the inn's first floor. It is a superb restaurant. The atmosphere is serene and relaxing, the service achieves a rare balance of proficiency and warmth, and the food is consistently satisfying. There are moments of culinary drama, mostly at the beginning, when your senses need stimulation, and at the end, when you want a finale to whistle about on the sidewalk.
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NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Big Small Plates By Cindy Pawlcyn with Pablo Jacinto and Erasto Jacinto Small Plates: Appetizers as Meals By Marguerite Marceau Henderson Gibbs Smith / 2006 / $18.95 This highly accessible book features small plates drawn from countries throughout the world, including Greece, Italy, Spain and India. Aimed primarily at those in search of easy entertainment ideas, many of the recipes are light and sophisticated; others would make an excellent meal just for family. The Pappardelle alla Primavera -- wide noodles with asparagus, red peppers, peas and carrots tossed in a light cream sauce and topped with parmesan cheese and chives -- was an instant hit in my household.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
My tablemates at Tark's Grill had never dined there before, so I gave them a brief history lesson. I told them about Harvey's, the restaurant that flourished in this Green Spring Station location for about 20 years, from the early 1980s to 2000, and about the string of ambitious restaurants that moved into the space after Harvey's closed. None of them lasted long, and the location began to feel jinxed. Then Tark's opened in 2008, and all was right again. Now, as then, the secret to the success of Tark's was a simple formula.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | August 16, 2006
What's the difference between fresh pasta and dried pasta? The term "fresh" generally refers to pasta made by hand with soft wheat flour and eggs. "Dried" implies a factory-made product made from hard wheat moistened only with water. What is most important to understand, however, is that neither type of pasta is superior to the other. Scholar Clifford Wright theorizes that what is known as dried pasta first was made around 1000, possibly in Sicily. Water and hard wheat flour were kneaded into a paste (pasta is Italian for paste)
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Sisson's The Sun Picolo Italiano Ristorante The Sunday Sun | November 16, 1991
TorremolinosTorremolinos Restaurant, 8 E. Preston St., (410) 752-5227. This long-time Spanish restaurant closed for a month last summer "for renovations." I was a little worried -- we all know plenty of restaurants that never return from alleged renovation. But not Torremolinos. Right on schedule, it came back, with a new paint job and rejuvenated service. The food even tasted better than on an earlier visit. The Tornedos Torremolinos ($16.50) and Ternera Castellana ($13.95), veal in a lemon-butter sauce, were both tender, beautifully sauced and full of flavor.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 27, 2005
This recipe is the result of not being able to shake a culinary flashback based on a decades-ago dinner in a tiny restaurant on the Greek island of Naxos. Because my taste buds are much sharper than my memory, it took several attempts to come up with this recipe. I like to keep packages of shrimp and squid on hand in the freezer. Small amounts of seafood defrost quickly under cold running water. Beverage pairing A crisp, dry Greek sauvignon blanc will match well. Tips Use only one type of seafood if you like.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Bartlett Pear Inn is the name of Alice and Jordan Lloyd's boutique inn on Harrison Street in Easton. It's also the name of their wonderful-in-every-way restaurant on the inn's first floor. It is a superb restaurant. The atmosphere is serene and relaxing, the service achieves a rare balance of proficiency and warmth, and the food is consistently satisfying. There are moments of culinary drama, mostly at the beginning, when your senses need stimulation, and at the end, when you want a finale to whistle about on the sidewalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
My tablemates at Tark's Grill had never dined there before, so I gave them a brief history lesson. I told them about Harvey's, the restaurant that flourished in this Green Spring Station location for about 20 years, from the early 1980s to 2000, and about the string of ambitious restaurants that moved into the space after Harvey's closed. None of them lasted long, and the location began to feel jinxed. Then Tark's opened in 2008, and all was right again. Now, as then, the secret to the success of Tark's was a simple formula.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Zagat released on Wednesday its first-ever survey of Italian food, the favorite cuisine of Zagat voters. According to the survey, 31 percent of Zagat voters report eating Italian food three or more times per week.   The survey was conducted online Jan. 16-25, and the results are from voters who report eating Italian food. Zagat voters say that their favorite pasta sauce is Bolognese, followed by marinara and arrabbiata, and their favorite pasta is pappardelle. Pappardelle? I didn't realize it had such a following.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Big Small Plates By Cindy Pawlcyn with Pablo Jacinto and Erasto Jacinto Small Plates: Appetizers as Meals By Marguerite Marceau Henderson Gibbs Smith / 2006 / $18.95 This highly accessible book features small plates drawn from countries throughout the world, including Greece, Italy, Spain and India. Aimed primarily at those in search of easy entertainment ideas, many of the recipes are light and sophisticated; others would make an excellent meal just for family. The Pappardelle alla Primavera -- wide noodles with asparagus, red peppers, peas and carrots tossed in a light cream sauce and topped with parmesan cheese and chives -- was an instant hit in my household.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | August 16, 2006
What's the difference between fresh pasta and dried pasta? The term "fresh" generally refers to pasta made by hand with soft wheat flour and eggs. "Dried" implies a factory-made product made from hard wheat moistened only with water. What is most important to understand, however, is that neither type of pasta is superior to the other. Scholar Clifford Wright theorizes that what is known as dried pasta first was made around 1000, possibly in Sicily. Water and hard wheat flour were kneaded into a paste (pasta is Italian for paste)
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 27, 2005
This recipe is the result of not being able to shake a culinary flashback based on a decades-ago dinner in a tiny restaurant on the Greek island of Naxos. Because my taste buds are much sharper than my memory, it took several attempts to come up with this recipe. I like to keep packages of shrimp and squid on hand in the freezer. Small amounts of seafood defrost quickly under cold running water. Beverage pairing A crisp, dry Greek sauvignon blanc will match well. Tips Use only one type of seafood if you like.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Sisson's The Sun Picolo Italiano Ristorante The Sunday Sun | November 16, 1991
TorremolinosTorremolinos Restaurant, 8 E. Preston St., (410) 752-5227. This long-time Spanish restaurant closed for a month last summer "for renovations." I was a little worried -- we all know plenty of restaurants that never return from alleged renovation. But not Torremolinos. Right on schedule, it came back, with a new paint job and rejuvenated service. The food even tasted better than on an earlier visit. The Tornedos Torremolinos ($16.50) and Ternera Castellana ($13.95), veal in a lemon-butter sauce, were both tender, beautifully sauced and full of flavor.
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | August 18, 1991
When the zucchini come marching in -- as they do relentlessly every growing season -- it doesn't take long before the troops go on zucchini overload. So what if agriculturalists praise zucchini as a high-yield crop? They are only squash, after all, and what is a cook supposed to do with so many of them?Years ago I found a delicious answer at a late-night dinner at the Union Square Cafe in New York. I wanted to eat something light and the waiter suggested a low-calorie pasta substitute called pappardelle of zucchini, named after the broad noodle Tuscan chefs pair with game.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 1999
"Redbook Flavor Rules!" (Hearst Books, $24.95) serves up a lively variety of ideas for making tasty meals at a streamlined pace.Golden Sea Scallops on Vegetable "Pappardelle" is among about 250 recipes the book features, from appetizers through desserts. The book's pages also are packed with loads of smart tips, helpful hints and color photos. All the recipes come with estimates of how long they'll take and how many calories and grams of fat they contain.This recipe for scallops will take 15 minutes to prepare and about 20 minutes to cook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Sotto Sopra has a tantalizing restarurant week menu, I think. Take a look. Essentiallly, it's the regular Sotto Sopra menu but I like how Riccardo Bosio has figured out a way to keep on a few of the higher-ticket items without sacrifcing quality -- simply charge a premium for them. How was opening weekend for Summer Restaurant Week. I was in Pittsburgh, where they've never heard of restaurant week.  I did hear from a reader who had a bad RW experience, complete with last-minute switcheroos and hot-house tomatoes.
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