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By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
At $14.95 and up a pop, children's books are an investment. But if the bucks for hardbacks aren't in your budget, take heart: Supplement twice-monthly trips to the public library with purchases of paperbacks a child can call her own.Most of the classics are available in paperback, and publishers are pretty good about adding new titles to their paperback lists each season. Here are some hardback hits now for sale in softcover:* The youngest listeners will be bopping along to the rhymes of "In the Tall, Tall Grass" by Denise Fleming (Holt, $5.95, ages 1-4, 32 pages)
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By From staff reports | August 17, 2008
Miracle at St. Anna : By James McBride: Riverhead / 307 pages / $15 James McBride's story of a Buffalo Soldier who befriends a 6-year-old Italian boy during World War II will hit the big screen next month under the direction of filmmaker Spike Lee. But until then, you can read the story in paperback. Inspired by real people and real events, the story tells of a group of black soldiers, cut off from their company, who find their humanity in a small Italian village.
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By JOSH GETLIN and JOSH GETLIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2006
For anyone who somehow missed picking up one of the 43 million hardcover copies of The Da Vinci Code that have been sold around the world in the past three years, the publisher is finally getting around to releasing the paperback -- in a big way. On March 28, Random House will be placing 5 million softcover copies of Dan Brown's conspiracy-minded religious thriller in an array of outlets well beyond your neighborhood bookstore, including drugstores, supermarkets,...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | June 30, 2008
For 11 years, Howard County officials and some residents have fought to close the jurisdiction's only adult bookstore. They've passed legislation and waged costly legal battles, only to be thwarted time and again. And now, despite a county law designed to force the Ellicott City store to move away from nearby homes or close, the Pack Shack appears poised to prevail again - maintaining its "Adult Video" sign along a busy stretch of U.S. 40, along with shelves of explicit movies, skimpy lingerie and sex toys.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | August 20, 1993
Of course you bought one of the 9 million copies of "Jurassic Park" in print, and certainly you've seen the movie. But if you've still got brontosauruses on the brain, take note:The illustrated gift edition of "Jurassic Park" is out. All yours, for $35.Today, publisher Alfred A. Knopf is releasing 15,000 copies of a special-edition hard-cover printing of Michael Crichton's best-selling novel, which was originally published in hardback in November 1990.The...
FEATURES
By Hartford Courant | November 7, 1990
LESS THAN THREE months after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, New York Times reporter Judith Miller and Harvard University fellow Laurie Mylroie have teamed up to produce a paperback original called "Saddam Hussein and the Crisis in the Gulf" (Times Books, $5.95).Miller wrote the well-received "One, by One, by One: Facing the Holocaust," and Mylroie is author of a forthcoming book on gulf security.Pantheon Books, meanwhile, has issued a paperback edition of "Republic of Fear: The Inside Story of Saddam's Iraq" by Samir al-Khalil ($12.
FEATURES
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | December 21, 1990
A BALTIMORE author's book about the assassination of President Kennedy is No. 3 on the New York Times paperback best-seller list.The book, "High Treason," written by Harrison Edward Livingstone, 53, who lives in Charles Village, alleges that long-hidden X-rays and photographs of Kennedy's body prove the fatal shot was fired from the front -- not from the rear as the official investigation concluded -- and that X-rays and autopsy photographs that had been...
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2001
Jonathon Scott Fuqua was ready to give up. He'd received more than 30 rejection letters for a book he had devoted a year to writing. "I had bought a bottle of champagne," he says. "I waited for my wife to come home from work. I stacked my manuscripts downstairs on this cement pad by our apartment house and I said, 'We're going to burn these and we're going to change our life. I'm not going to sit here and wait for the mail every day. I'm not going to do that to us,' "says Fuqua. It took an hour of cajoling, negotiating and pleading, but his wife, Julie Lauffenburger, talked him out of it. "I gave him a 'reality punch' and let him know that I know writing is what he's meant to do. Sometimes he doesn't see it as clearly as I do."
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
I come to praise Ralph Ellison and to defend his legacy, to say once again that "Invisible Man" is one of the great literary testaments of all time. But now, a fine writer has been wronged. His reputation should have been allowed to stand on what he published in his lifetime."Juneteenth," the novel Ellison sweated and labored over for the better part of 40 years and never completed to his satisfaction, is now in the public domain. He deserves better from the literary trade.Why can't we be satisfied with what our great artists saw fit to give us before their deaths?
NEWS
February 26, 2006
102 Minutes By Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn Times Books / 384 pages / $15 Two New York Times journalists relate what we couldn't see or hardly imagine on Sept. 11. Last year, we called their account a "harrowing ... minute-by-minute and floor-by-floor portrayal of what happened inside the World Trade Center."
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