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NEWS
July 3, 2012
Every once in a while, we get a sharp reminder that mankind is not "in charge" on this planet ("Post-storm swelter," July 2). After the storms of the last few days, a quarter-million people are without power in Maryland alone, with a total of about 3 million along the East Coast. Somehow, every single one of the people think they should be first in line to have their electricity turned back on. Most of the damage was caused by winds of near-hurricane force knocking down and uprooting trees.
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NEWS
July 3, 2012
Every once in a while, we get a sharp reminder that mankind is not "in charge" on this planet ("Post-storm swelter," July 2). After the storms of the last few days, a quarter-million people are without power in Maryland alone, with a total of about 3 million along the East Coast. Somehow, every single one of the people think they should be first in line to have their electricity turned back on. Most of the damage was caused by winds of near-hurricane force knocking down and uprooting trees.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
After a 10-year dry spell, booze is back at Towson State University tailgate parties.And it's long overdue, say students, parents and alumni."We probably would not be here," said Marc Veilleux, a TSU senior drinking Miller Lite from a red plastic cup while grilling burgers, sausage and chicken before a 1 p.m. TSU football game against Colgate University yesterday. "We'd still be in bed."The decadelong ban on alcoholic beverages was put into effect after inebriated students wreaked havoc at a homecoming football game in 1986, setting fire to a parade float, overturning a car and pushing over portable toilets, some while they were occupied.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Acme Paper & Supply Co. has a name more befitting its past than its present. When the company started in 1946, it specialized in paper products such as drinking cups. Today, Acme is a much different company — so much so that the tagline "more than paper" has been appended to its name. Plastics are now the predominant part of the business. The company also has helped the U.S. House of Representatives switch to more environmentally friendly products. If you've ever used hand sanitizer at a hospital or restaurant, it was likely supplied by Acme.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2008
Soup's On opened back in February above a natural foods store in Mount Vernon, a few blocks from the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. This is a hidden space that you meet up a short flight of stairs from a single door at street level. Over the decades, a bunch of cafes and carry-outs have tried to make a go of it up there. The most notable success was Soo's Kimchee House. A few of the other attempts seemed doomed from the start.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 11, 1996
THE OTHER DAY, the 10-year-old announced her intention to open a sidewalk lemonade stand."Sounds great," I said. "Where will you put it?"She said she planned to sell the lemonade from an overturned crate in front of our house."
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
Shirley McCoy of Crystal Lake, Ill., asked for a recipe for caramel candy like that which "a man from the church made in big batches for sale at the church fair. You could chew them without losing a tooth, and they had the greatest caramel, buttery flavor."Mary Cadwell of Sioux Falls, S.D., answered the request. "These are very soft and very rich with a buttery caramel flavor that melts in your mouth," she said. "I make them every Christmas, and everyone loves them."A recipe for Almond-Flavored Poppy-Seed Muffins was the request of Mrs. L. J. Stevens of Sioux Falls, S.D. The selected recipe came from Felicia Whitney of Hudson, N.H., who notes that the muffins are her family's favorite.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Acme Paper & Supply Co. has a name more befitting its past than its present. When the company started in 1946, it specialized in paper products such as drinking cups. Today, Acme is a much different company — so much so that the tagline "more than paper" has been appended to its name. Plastics are now the predominant part of the business. The company also has helped the U.S. House of Representatives switch to more environmentally friendly products. If you've ever used hand sanitizer at a hospital or restaurant, it was likely supplied by Acme.
NEWS
By John Murphy and James M. Coram and John Murphy and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Lisa Respers contributed to this article | June 12, 1998
Sweetheart Cup Co., one of the nation's largest manufacturers of disposable paper plates and cups, is eyeing property south of Hampstead as the possible site of a 900,000-square-foot distribution center.The facility would serve as an East Coast distribution center for the Owings Mills-based company and would initially employ about 120 people, sources close to the dealings said yesterday.The property, owned by Black & Decker U.S. Inc., is off Houcksville Road.Hampstead Mayor Christopher M. Nevin confirmed that Sweetheart is interested in the site.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 31, 1991
Who says you can't have it both ways?You love sumptuously rich, chocolate-covered ice cream bars. But you also dote on low-calorie frozen fruit and yogurt pops.Go ahead, indulge. Just in time for the dog days of summer, we've developed recipes for ultra-rich ice cream bars and low-calorie fruit pops.Frozen Caramel-Peanut Ice Cream Bars1 quart vanilla ice cream1 12.25-ounce jar caramel ice cream topping1/2 cup salted peanuts18 ounces chocolate, cut into chunks8 tablespoons butter8 tablespoons creamFreeze the ice cream (a rectangular quart works best)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2008
Soup's On opened back in February above a natural foods store in Mount Vernon, a few blocks from the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. This is a hidden space that you meet up a short flight of stairs from a single door at street level. Over the decades, a bunch of cafes and carry-outs have tried to make a go of it up there. The most notable success was Soo's Kimchee House. A few of the other attempts seemed doomed from the start.
NEWS
By John Murphy and James M. Coram and John Murphy and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Lisa Respers contributed to this article | June 12, 1998
Sweetheart Cup Co., one of the nation's largest manufacturers of disposable paper plates and cups, is eyeing property south of Hampstead as the possible site of a 900,000-square-foot distribution center.The facility would serve as an East Coast distribution center for the Owings Mills-based company and would initially employ about 120 people, sources close to the dealings said yesterday.The property, owned by Black & Decker U.S. Inc., is off Houcksville Road.Hampstead Mayor Christopher M. Nevin confirmed that Sweetheart is interested in the site.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
Shirley McCoy of Crystal Lake, Ill., asked for a recipe for caramel candy like that which "a man from the church made in big batches for sale at the church fair. You could chew them without losing a tooth, and they had the greatest caramel, buttery flavor."Mary Cadwell of Sioux Falls, S.D., answered the request. "These are very soft and very rich with a buttery caramel flavor that melts in your mouth," she said. "I make them every Christmas, and everyone loves them."A recipe for Almond-Flavored Poppy-Seed Muffins was the request of Mrs. L. J. Stevens of Sioux Falls, S.D. The selected recipe came from Felicia Whitney of Hudson, N.H., who notes that the muffins are her family's favorite.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
After a 10-year dry spell, booze is back at Towson State University tailgate parties.And it's long overdue, say students, parents and alumni."We probably would not be here," said Marc Veilleux, a TSU senior drinking Miller Lite from a red plastic cup while grilling burgers, sausage and chicken before a 1 p.m. TSU football game against Colgate University yesterday. "We'd still be in bed."The decadelong ban on alcoholic beverages was put into effect after inebriated students wreaked havoc at a homecoming football game in 1986, setting fire to a parade float, overturning a car and pushing over portable toilets, some while they were occupied.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 11, 1996
THE OTHER DAY, the 10-year-old announced her intention to open a sidewalk lemonade stand."Sounds great," I said. "Where will you put it?"She said she planned to sell the lemonade from an overturned crate in front of our house."
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
The Orioles are taking donations to aid the victims of Hurricane Sandy on Thursday and Friday at Camden Yards. Fans can bring donations to the Orioles' team offices at the Camden Yards warehouse until 5 p.m. Thursday and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Contributions will then be taken directly to damage-stricken areas of New Jersey in Union Beach, Belmar, Tom's River, Hazlet and Seabright over the weekend. Those dropping off donations can park in the north warehouse lot near the Orioles team store and can drop items off at the second-floor reception desk.
NEWS
May 22, 1999
TO MANY motorists, Maryland's roads must look like a sprawling trash receptacle. How else can one explain the increasing litter that dirties the landscape?The state estimates that it is picking up 61 percent more litter than 10 years ago, and Adopt-a-Highway volunteers are collecting more roadside rubbish. Imagine what the roads would look like without these efforts.Indeed, the litterbug is back in Maryland and across the country. The nation has 74,000 more miles of roads, 21 million more cars and 85,000 more fast-food restaurants than 20 years ago. A generation has elapsed since public service announcements featuring a tearful Native American implored us to keep America beautiful.
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