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NEWS
June 14, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake needs to spend more time thinking and picking her battles and reconsider a shopping bag fee for paper bags ("A better bag tax," June 12). Her recycling initiative has been successful, and we have been diligent participants every week. We do not have a garage or space to keep a recycling can inside and keep a paper bag in the kitchen to be placed in the recycling bin for all paper, plastic, etc., which is full to the top with the collective paper bags every week.
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NEWS
February 1, 2014
The city's proposed 10-cent bag tax was unwarranted and burdensome to the citizens of Baltimore ( "City Council votes down 10-cent bag fee," Jan 27). I along with most of my neighbors in Belair-Edison reuse or recycle our plastic and paper bags. The disposable bags are a hygienic necessity for those with small children, invalids or pets. We also use them to store and carry items. (For example, most of the food donated by individuals to food banks for the poor is in plastic bags.)
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NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun Reporter | July 10, 2007
An Annapolis city council member formally introduced legislation last night to outlaw the use of plastic bags in all retail establishments within the city limits. Under the bill, merchants would have to issue recyclable paper bags or reusable bags or face a fine of up to $500. The aim of the ordinance is to protect the environment, said Alderman Samuel E. Shropshire, the bill's sponsor. "Plastic bags are ending up in landfills and blowing around in the wind and ending up in waterways.
NEWS
January 23, 2014
The proposed 10-cent bag fee that the Baltimore City Council will vote on next week is a bad idea ("City may impose 10-cent bag fee," Jan. 22). Giving merchants a 3-cents-per-bag cut in the new revenue is an even worse idea. Councilman James B. Kraft said that merchants are "flagrantly violating" a law that requires them to voluntarily offer customers plastic or paper bags. I believe that by giving these same law-breaking merchants a 3-cents-per-bag incentive will result in crafty shopkeepers actually pushing bags on customers.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2007
Environmentalists and business owners packed the Annapolis city council chambers last night to tell their sides on a proposed citywide ban on plastic bags at a public hearing, with grocery chains also weighing in on an issue that would change the way they do business. Under the legislation, sponsored by Alderman Samuel E. Shropshire, all retailers and restaurants would have to provide recyclable paper bags or reusable bags or be fined up to $500.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | July 22, 2008
Legislation that would have made Baltimore the second city in the nation to ban plastic bags at grocery stores and retail chains was killed by the full City Council last night. Intended to keep plastic bags from clogging waterways, the proposal would have required large stores - those with $500,000 or more in gross revenue - to bag groceries in paper or reusable bags only. Days after it was approved by a committee, the full council voted against the proposal, 11-3. "I know there has been a lot of pressure on this bill," City Councilman James B. Kraft, the lead sponsor, said of opponents who have lobbied against the measure.
NEWS
February 1, 2014
The city's proposed 10-cent bag tax was unwarranted and burdensome to the citizens of Baltimore ( "City Council votes down 10-cent bag fee," Jan 27). I along with most of my neighbors in Belair-Edison reuse or recycle our plastic and paper bags. The disposable bags are a hygienic necessity for those with small children, invalids or pets. We also use them to store and carry items. (For example, most of the food donated by individuals to food banks for the poor is in plastic bags.)
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | October 26, 2007
A group of Annapolis business owners expressed support yesterday for a bill that would ban plastic bags from use at city retail outlets, while acknowledging the move could negatively affect their bottom lines. "If little shops like us are changing, I think the bigger shops can follow suit," said Gary Amoth, owner of the Hard Bean Coffee and Booksellers in downtown Annapolis. He estimated it would cost him a penny and a half more to begin buying paper bags. "It's a bit more expensive for me to do, there's no question," Amoth said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | September 23, 2008
Baltimore's pawnbrokers and dealers in secondhand merchandise will to have e-mail the city Police Department daily photographs and descriptions of the jewelry, televisions and other items they receive to comply with a law passed yesterday evening by the City Council. The new electronic dispatches will enable detectives to create a database of pawned wares in the city that they hope will help them solve more thefts. Currently the city's 37 pawnshops and 78 secondhand dealers mail paper copies of those reports to detectives.
EXPLORE
January 22, 2012
As an employee at a grocery store in Montgomery County, I am pleased with the implementation of the new bag tax, a law that initially began in Washington. I think that it would be beneficial for Baltimore County, as well as other Maryland counties, to study the idea and consider passing an anti-litter tax. This law would have a positive impact because stores will have to order less bags. Typically, a case of plastic bags costs about $30; paper bags are even more costly. Furthermore, customers will be more mindful about not wasting bags if they have to pay for each one. They will likewise be encouraged to take their reusable bags back to the store to do their shopping.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
For more than two years, Baltimore city has tried to fight its litter problem with a law barring merchants from giving shoppers plastic bags unless they ask for them. But even the law's supporters acknowledge it's had little impact. Of more than 200 food vendors inspected by the Health Department, at least three-fourths have not posted the required signs informing customers of the no-bag-unless-you-ask policy, according to the city's Office of Sustainability. Yet only one store - the Safeway supermarket in Canton - has been fined for not complying with the law. And nearly four out of five businesses, including grocery stores, takeout restaurants and convenience stores, keep giving out plastic sacks despite hopes that the law would encourage more to offer only paper bags.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake needs to spend more time thinking and picking her battles and reconsider a shopping bag fee for paper bags ("A better bag tax," June 12). Her recycling initiative has been successful, and we have been diligent participants every week. We do not have a garage or space to keep a recycling can inside and keep a paper bag in the kitchen to be placed in the recycling bin for all paper, plastic, etc., which is full to the top with the collective paper bags every week.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 23, 2013
 In a setback for environmentalists, a House committee killed a bill Saturday that would have required counties to impose a fee on disposable plastic and paper bags given out by stores to carry merchandise. The Economic Matters Committee voted 14-9 to disapprove the measure, sponsored by Del. Mary Washington, a Baltimore Democrat. The bill had earlier been passed by the Environmental Affairs Committee but required the approval of both panels. The legislation would have placed a 5-cent fee on bags - with exceptions for such items as carry-out food and dry-cleaning - and would have let the stores retain one cent of the fee to compensate for administrative costs.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
With limited materials, a patriotic theme, and their own ingenuity, students at The Harbour School put together their ninth annual Fourth of July parade of paper floats Tuesday. Working on a tight schedule, each class at the Owings Mills school for children with learning and developmental disabilities built their entries, bearing in mind this year's "O Say Can You See" theme. With teachers' supply carts for wheels, they marched their sparkling displays before a panel of judges. "We give them a small bag of supplies but no money," said Martha Schneider, program director at the Owings Mills school, whose 106 students range in age from 6 to 21 years.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Montrease Lamback of Gwynn Oak stood on the sidelines and snapped photos as her 2-year-old son, Tyler, slipped plastic Easter eggs into his green felt basket. The eggs secured, Tyler pulled them back out, tossed some on the ground, handed a few to other children and then stopped midhunt to admire what remained of his colorful collection. The adventure for Tyler and hundreds of other children Saturday was part of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 's annual Bunny Bonanzoo.
EXPLORE
January 22, 2012
As an employee at a grocery store in Montgomery County, I am pleased with the implementation of the new bag tax, a law that initially began in Washington. I think that it would be beneficial for Baltimore County, as well as other Maryland counties, to study the idea and consider passing an anti-litter tax. This law would have a positive impact because stores will have to order less bags. Typically, a case of plastic bags costs about $30; paper bags are even more costly. Furthermore, customers will be more mindful about not wasting bags if they have to pay for each one. They will likewise be encouraged to take their reusable bags back to the store to do their shopping.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES AND JULIE BYKOWICZ | March 21, 2006
The gas station owner who shot and killed one of three would-be robbers at the Village of Cross Keys last week told police that the men opened his car door, beat him and then grabbed paper bags filled with thousands of dollars, according to court papers made public yesterday. Mark A. Beckwith, 57, also told police that one of the men had a gun, charging documents show. Beckwith pulled out a 9 mm Glock semiautomatic pistol and fired at his assailants 16 times, the documents show. Keith D. Love, 22, was fatally wounded in the robbery, which occurred about 2 p.m. Friday in a parking lot near a Williams-Sonoma store.
NEWS
June 17, 2007
ISSUE: -- The Annapolis city council is scheduled to hear next month legislation that would outlaw common plastic bags at grocery stores, pharmacies, clothing shops and other retailers in hopes of reducing litter and protecting the environment. "Banning plastic is the right way to go. We can live without plastic checkout bags," said the sponsor of the Annapolis ordinance, Alderman Samuel E. Shropshire. In taking up the paper-versus-plastic question, Baltimore and Annapolis are joining a handful of cities questioning the wisdom of widespread use of the bags.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
A suspicious package reported to police Friday morning on the corner of North Charles and East Chase Streets contained nothing but clothing, police said in the afternoon. Police were called to the intersection around 9:20 a.m., after receiving a 911 call reporting a "large, suspicious paper bag," said Det. Kevin Brown, a police spokesman. Officers investigated the package and found only clothing inside, he said. "It was suspicious but there's nothing to it," Brown said. jtorbati@baltsun.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Acme Paper & Supply Co. has a name more befitting its past than its present. When the company started in 1946, it specialized in paper products such as drinking cups. Today, Acme is a much different company — so much so that the tagline "more than paper" has been appended to its name. Plastics are now the predominant part of the business. The company also has helped the U.S. House of Representatives switch to more environmentally friendly products. If you've ever used hand sanitizer at a hospital or restaurant, it was likely supplied by Acme.
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