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NEWS
April 28, 2012
Dan Rodricks proclaims his annoyance with those of us who walk out of grocery stores with plastic bags ("Overpriced popcorn, O's early-season tease and other annoyances," April 26). I'd wager that the majority of us who offend Mr. Rodricks in this way are dog owners. I have three big ones, and they leave big messes on lawns. If you want me to pick up after them, I need plastic bags to do it. Sorry if it's ecologically unsound, but I'm not about to use a cloth bag and wash the bag. Fred Pasek, Frederick
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Five fast reasons to check out "How to Get Away With Murder," the newest drama from Shonda Rhimes. 1. Culturally, it is fascinating to see the shift in authority figures from John Houseman's Prof. Kingsfield in "Paper Chase" (1973) to Viola Davis as Prof. Annalise Keating in this series four decades later. Also, intriguing is the shift in how Hollywood portrays first-year law school and the kinds of students one finds there. 2. No producer in the history of network TV has had a whole night of prime-time dramas coming out of her or his production company until this year with "Grey's Anatomy," "Scandal" and "Murder" all coming from Rhimes shop.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | December 29, 2011
Technology has overtaken the U.S. savings bonds. After this year, you will no longer be able to buy a paper bond. All purchases will be made electronically. By going totally electronic, the government is expected to save $120 million over five years. You still will  be able to redeem paper bonds at banks, though. Since 1935, people have purchased the bonds to fund the government's operations. The bonds became a traditional gift for a newborn. The Treasury Department is saying good-bye with an online interactive timeline , which includes cameos of celebrities who promoted the sale of savings bonds over the decades.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
Earl Weaver once said that he had given a player more chances than his first wife. The same can be said for my relationship with The Sun. I can go over a long list of issues that have taken a once proud newspaper to lowly depths and will be happy to go over them if anyone at the paper cares. The truth is that I can no longer buy your newspaper when a Baltimore Orioles home night game is considered a "late game" and you have no information or box score on the game in the next day's paper.
FEATURES
October 8, 2012
How can I get my cat to stop tearing and eating paper? The ingestion of any nonfood item is not a normal activity for a cat and should be diagnosed by your veterinarian to assess whether this is a medical, behavioral or nutritional issue. You can assist with this diagnosis by logging and sharing the frequency, timing and consequences of this event. Does it happen each time there is paper in sight; is your cat alone when this happens; does this interfere with normal eating and elimination patterns of your cat?
EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
A few years ago, Pat van den Beemt covered a small boy who was honored by the Hereford Volunteer Fire Department for giving his "earnings" from a lemonade stand, about $400, to their efforts. I just wanted to share how life has come full circle. This young boy has grown into the young man who was photographed at the SJATV-Radio Station, the auburn-haired announcer named Jack Jankowski. (North County News, "St. James Academy students tune in," Oct. 11). I am his proud mother. I noticed your byline and recall how kind you were to us during the original story at the fire department and what an impact it had on him then.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | August 24, 2006
SEATTLE -- Weyerhaeuser Co. abandoned plans to sell its paper division yesterday, saying it will merge it with Canada's Domtar Inc. in a $3.3 billion transaction that will create North America's largest maker of paper used in facsimile and copying machines. Weyerhaeuser's shareholders will get a 55 percent stake in the new company. The American firm also will get a majority of the 13-member board, plus $1.35 billion in cash. The new company will have 14,000 employees, be based in Montreal and will be led by Raymond Royer, Domtar's president and chief executive officer.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | July 19, 1992
Evelyn M. Geis, a Glen Burnie widow of 78, called a month ago to say that the new 5 percent newspaper sales tax and an increase in her homeowners' insurance made her doubt she could keep The Evening Sun.She was sad. ''I've been reading it since I was 15 in my mother's house,'' she said.Ms. Geis described her tight Social Security budget, including car and home insurance, power, phone, Christmas Club, Blue Cross-Blue Shield, food and so on. She had never missed a Sun payment since she and Elmer C. Geis Jr., streetcar man, were married in 1947 and began getting both The Sun and The Evening Sun. When Elmer died in 1982, she dropped The Sun (which he liked)
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | May 31, 1991
Baltimore's Monumental Paper Co., best known for its modern-art-decorated delivery trucks, was sold yesterday to the nation's largest paper distributor, Valley Forge, Pa.-based Alco Standard Corp.Soll Selko, Monumental's president, said last night that he and his family would remain in control of the 55-year-old packaging and chemical distribution company, which was founded by his father. He also said the company will retain its distinctive trucks, which are painted with red, blue and yellow squares in the style of artist Piet Mondrian.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | December 5, 2008
Finnish paper manufacturer UPM signed a 10-year contract with the port of Baltimore yesterday to ship at least 320,000 tons of product through the harbor annually, a deal Maryland officials said would help the port maintain jobs during the economic downturn. The 16,000-employee port is Maryland's largest provider of blue- collar jobs. The UPM deal will result in 120 jobs and $2.7 million in tax revenue, state officials said. Yesterday's contract-signing took place in a $32 million port-side warehouse built for UPM by the state about three years ago. The paper company has been shipping product through Baltimore since the early 1990s.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Like most children, Steve Mull loved Disney movies when he was little. But for the Fallston native, the appeal wasn't just the songs or the stories - he loved the movie posters.  As a little boy, he drew those images over and over. At the time, he thought he was just having fun. But as it turns out, he was teaching himself to be an artist. Today, Mull, who still lives in Fallston, now with his wife, Liz, and their 2-year-old son, Charlie, works with simple tools - markers and paper - to create fun, colorful depictions of Baltimore icons, from Ray Lewis to crabs and cans of Natty Boh. He sells both originals and prints via his website and occasionally at local shows, like the Gunpowder River ArtFest at Boordy Vineyards.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Media Group is buying up more newspapers ( "Sun purchases Annapolis and Carroll papers," May 2). Why? It cannot seem to adequately manage The Baltimore Sun, its premier publication. After elimination of all competition, Baltimore is left with a third-rate publication that is over-priced, poorly run and apparently devoid of management and editorial staff. As a long-time recipient of home delivery of The Sun, I feel at the mercy of a media mogul group with no regard for its readers or advertisers.
NEWS
By Kevin M. Brien | May 4, 2014
Twenty-two years ago at the end of a semester of teaching an Intro to Philosophy course, I received an unforgettable wake-up call on the issue of plagiarism. During the reading period between the final class session and the final exam, I discovered two blatant cases of plagiarized papers - I knew the books from which these papers had been copied whole cloth. So on exam day, and with apologies to those uninvolved, I brought the issue into the open. Without naming the offenders, I told the class that I expected the students who plagiarized to meet with me privately.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 25, 2014
Sen. John McCain, who endlessly enjoys twisting the tail of what he suggests is a paper tiger in the White House, has altered the old Teddy Roosevelt axiom. He accuses President Obama of talking tough but carrying a big "twig. " Thus does he lament the president's penchant for drawing red lines on adversaries' foreign-policy misconduct, followed by subsequent timidity. He cites Obama's harsh words against Syrian atrocities and lack of action against them, and his mild sanctions in response to the recent Russian interventions in Crimea and eastern Ukraine.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | April 15, 2014
Cash or credit? Cash: At the Hot Stove restaurant on Cape Cod, which I visit every summer vacation for one of their tasty burgers served on English muffins, patrons must pay their tab in cash or by check. A few years ago, the pub stopped taking credit cards to avoid paying transaction fees to Visa and MasterCard. There's an on-site ATM for customers unaware of the new policy. If this sounds like a stupid, even selfish business decision, think again: Each year the Hot Stove's owners donate the amount saved in transaction fees to local charities.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
If you've ever been at one of Baltimore's ballparks with a souvenir Orioles or Ravens cup in hand, it was most likely made by Savage-based Acme Paper and Supply Co. The family-run business, born in Baltimore in the 1940s, has been with the Orioles for decades and is now responsible for stocking many of the region's largest attractions - M&T Bank Stadium, Maryland Live Casino, King's Dominion - with cups, nacho trays, napkins and a slew of other...
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 30, 2014
As the song "Timber" rocked through the speakers, the crowd gathered for River Hill High School's Cultural Awareness Night couldn't stay seated - soon everyone joined in for a Zumba demonstration. "I did Zumba," laughed Amy Hairston, the schools choral director, catching her breath. As faculty sponsor of the River Hill's Cultural Awareness Club, which organized the March 25 festivities, Hairston was enjoying herself after all the work the group put into organizing the night. "This is the third year I spearheaded this," Hairston said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector | February 20, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Media Group announced Thursday that it is buying the alternative weekly City Paper for an undisclosed price, bringing the city's two most recognizable print journalism outlets under the same roof. City Paper will remain independent from the group's other outlets with a separate newsroom and sales team, said Timothy E. Ryan, publisher, president and CEO of Baltimore Sun Media Group. “This represents a great opportunity to add another successful media property to our portfolio,” Ryan said in a statement.
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