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NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | May 31, 2006
What characteristics should I look for when selecting avocados and papayas? Avocados and papayas share a couple of crucial qualities: They are tropical fruit; they are usually purchased in an unripe state; and they will ripen happily at home. Yes, the avocado is a fruit. Like the tomato, it has become an honorary vegetable because it lends itself to savory preparations. But, botanically speaking, it is a fruit, Persea americana, a member of the Lauraceae (Laurel) family that also includes bay laurel, cinnamon and sassafras.
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BUSINESS
March 9, 2010
Maryland's first Papaya Factory Outlet will open this spring in Arundel Mills in Hanover, mall officials said Monday. Papaya Factory Outlet, an upscale, contemporary women's apparel retailer that will offer tops, dresses, outerwear and accessories, will open in May. Mall officials also said Vans Outlet Store, which specializes in teen footwear and apparel, will expand and move to a spot near Best Buy this spring. Arundel Mills has more than 200 stores, with a mix of name-brand outlets, specialty shops, restaurants and entertainment, including Kenneth Cole Company Store, Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH, Ann Taylor Factory Store and Neiman Marcus Last Call.
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FEATURES
By JIMMY SCHMIDT and JIMMY SCHMIDT,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 1996
Adding a tropical flavor in salsa to broiled shrimp with a rice side dish makes a meal to remember.Shrimp have a wonderful, resilient texture and a sweet, delicate flavor. But they need a little shot of spice and acid to pick up their natural flavors. The combination of tropical papaya, lime, onions and herbs will elevate the flavor and your prestige to the top of the charts.Although most of the shrimp available are frozen, one still should be picky on the quality and source. I prefer Gulf shrimp rather than many of the Asian imports.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | August 1, 2007
August has arrived, and in Baltimore that means many of us want to avoid cooking entirely. But we still want to eat, of course, and we might even want to entertain. One solution is to make something pretty out of material that's cool, readily available and at its peak: fresh fruit. Baltimore International College chef instructor Ben Simpkins showed us how to make a centerpiece for the picnic table with a few basic supplies. You'll need wooden skewers that can be cut into various lengths, toothpicks, a sharp paring knife, and some leaf and flower-shaped cookie cutters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 6, 1994
Smell isn't the only sense evoked by Tran Anh Hung's "The Scent of Green Papaya," which opens today at the Charles. In fact, one would be hard-pressed to recall a film more in love with the sensual evocation of the universe.Hung's account of a young peasant servant girl come to the big city of Saigon in 1951 to work at the house of a musician is unbelievably vivid: how things look, how they feel, how they smell. It's an amazing bit of movie imagining. He literally rubs you against the textures of existence -- the light in the air, the gelid humidity, the inflation of a frog's membranes as it breathes, the ,, pad of feet on mahogany floors -- that's astonishing.
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA and RENEE ENNA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 14, 2006
The tiki trend amuses those among us who always have embraced Polynesia. Tiki always has been about fun, and that can extend to dinnertime. Here, broiled chicken breasts get the tiki treatment with a papaya-pineapple marinade. Papaya is available in markets year-round and is worth knowing for its tropical flavor and nutrition. A half-cup has 27 calories and is rich in vitamin A and potassium. It comes in two sizes. Here we're using smaller papayas but a large papaya will work, too. Sesame and ginger are showing up in many bottled dressings for an appropriate salad topping.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | August 1, 2007
August has arrived, and in Baltimore that means many of us want to avoid cooking entirely. But we still want to eat, of course, and we might even want to entertain. One solution is to make something pretty out of material that's cool, readily available and at its peak: fresh fruit. Baltimore International College chef instructor Ben Simpkins showed us how to make a centerpiece for the picnic table with a few basic supplies. You'll need wooden skewers that can be cut into various lengths, toothpicks, a sharp paring knife, and some leaf and flower-shaped cookie cutters.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
He's the Harvard-trained doctor who made a name for himself advocating healthful eating. She's a spa chef who became famous as Oprah's cook. Together Andrew Weil and Rosie Daley have written The Healthy Kitchen (Alfred A. Knopf, 2002, $24.95), a he-said, she-said cookbook based on the premise that foods that are good for you can also taste good. What they offer is a primer on nutrition, including discussions of controversial questions regarding salt, wine, eggs and dairy products. Along the way, they introduce the reader to "eating mindfully," a Buddhist approach of devoting full attention to each mouthful.
FEATURES
By Patsy Jamieson | June 26, 1996
"Let's just throw something on the grill" is a familiar refrain around my house this time of year. Thanks to the outdoor grill, summer promises a more relaxed approach to cooking and entertaining.Perhaps for that reason, it is my favorite cooking season (at least one of my favorites).As a cooking method, grilling has many advantages: the caramelized surfaces and slight smokiness created by cooking over coals or a gas flame intensify and enhance food's intrinsic flavors.But there is a downside to grilling.
FEATURES
By Patsy Jamieson and Patsy Jamieson,EATING WELL United Feature Syndicate | October 29, 1995
To the viewer's eyes, a television cook appears to be working in a fully equipped kitchen, but this is pure illusion. Except for programs dedicated solely to cooking and some national shows, the "kitchen" is just a set in the corner of the newsroom or studio -- there's nothing behind the oven door, and the only running water is in the ladies' room. Preparing for these appearances is like packing for a wilderness expedition.The following recipes come from some of my recent cooking demonstrations and television appearances.
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA and RENEE ENNA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 14, 2006
The tiki trend amuses those among us who always have embraced Polynesia. Tiki always has been about fun, and that can extend to dinnertime. Here, broiled chicken breasts get the tiki treatment with a papaya-pineapple marinade. Papaya is available in markets year-round and is worth knowing for its tropical flavor and nutrition. A half-cup has 27 calories and is rich in vitamin A and potassium. It comes in two sizes. Here we're using smaller papayas but a large papaya will work, too. Sesame and ginger are showing up in many bottled dressings for an appropriate salad topping.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | May 31, 2006
What characteristics should I look for when selecting avocados and papayas? Avocados and papayas share a couple of crucial qualities: They are tropical fruit; they are usually purchased in an unripe state; and they will ripen happily at home. Yes, the avocado is a fruit. Like the tomato, it has become an honorary vegetable because it lends itself to savory preparations. But, botanically speaking, it is a fruit, Persea americana, a member of the Lauraceae (Laurel) family that also includes bay laurel, cinnamon and sassafras.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
He's the Harvard-trained doctor who made a name for himself advocating healthful eating. She's a spa chef who became famous as Oprah's cook. Together Andrew Weil and Rosie Daley have written The Healthy Kitchen (Alfred A. Knopf, 2002, $24.95), a he-said, she-said cookbook based on the premise that foods that are good for you can also taste good. What they offer is a primer on nutrition, including discussions of controversial questions regarding salt, wine, eggs and dairy products. Along the way, they introduce the reader to "eating mindfully," a Buddhist approach of devoting full attention to each mouthful.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | March 11, 1998
In the past 10 years, America has become very, very thirsty.Open today's refrigerator and you'll find it bulging with more bottled beverages than anyone would have dreamed possible a few years ago. The new products just keep on coming.Recently, Coca-Cola introduced a new grapefruit-flavored soft drink into the Baltimore-Washington area. Citra, a sort of Fresca with sugar, is aimed at "outgoing and physically active young consumers," as the company's press material puts it.Carbonated soft drink sales have climbed to around $60 billion a year.
FEATURES
By Patsy Jamieson | June 26, 1996
"Let's just throw something on the grill" is a familiar refrain around my house this time of year. Thanks to the outdoor grill, summer promises a more relaxed approach to cooking and entertaining.Perhaps for that reason, it is my favorite cooking season (at least one of my favorites).As a cooking method, grilling has many advantages: the caramelized surfaces and slight smokiness created by cooking over coals or a gas flame intensify and enhance food's intrinsic flavors.But there is a downside to grilling.
FEATURES
By JIMMY SCHMIDT and JIMMY SCHMIDT,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 1996
Adding a tropical flavor in salsa to broiled shrimp with a rice side dish makes a meal to remember.Shrimp have a wonderful, resilient texture and a sweet, delicate flavor. But they need a little shot of spice and acid to pick up their natural flavors. The combination of tropical papaya, lime, onions and herbs will elevate the flavor and your prestige to the top of the charts.Although most of the shrimp available are frozen, one still should be picky on the quality and source. I prefer Gulf shrimp rather than many of the Asian imports.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1994
The 25th Annual Baltimore International Film Festival will open Wednesday at the Senator Theatre with an 8 p.m. screening of "The Scent of Green Papaya," winner of the Camera d'Or at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival.A champagne reception precedes the film at 7:30 p.m., and a desert reception follows at 10 p.m. Tickets for opening and closing nights are $12 general admission and $10 for seniors, students and members of the Baltimore Film Forum.All other festival films will show at the Baltimore Museum of Art ($6 general admission and $5 for seniors, students and forum members)
BUSINESS
March 9, 2010
Maryland's first Papaya Factory Outlet will open this spring in Arundel Mills in Hanover, mall officials said Monday. Papaya Factory Outlet, an upscale, contemporary women's apparel retailer that will offer tops, dresses, outerwear and accessories, will open in May. Mall officials also said Vans Outlet Store, which specializes in teen footwear and apparel, will expand and move to a spot near Best Buy this spring. Arundel Mills has more than 200 stores, with a mix of name-brand outlets, specialty shops, restaurants and entertainment, including Kenneth Cole Company Store, Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH, Ann Taylor Factory Store and Neiman Marcus Last Call.
FEATURES
By Patsy Jamieson and Patsy Jamieson,EATING WELL United Feature Syndicate | October 29, 1995
To the viewer's eyes, a television cook appears to be working in a fully equipped kitchen, but this is pure illusion. Except for programs dedicated solely to cooking and some national shows, the "kitchen" is just a set in the corner of the newsroom or studio -- there's nothing behind the oven door, and the only running water is in the ladies' room. Preparing for these appearances is like packing for a wilderness expedition.The following recipes come from some of my recent cooking demonstrations and television appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 6, 1994
Smell isn't the only sense evoked by Tran Anh Hung's "The Scent of Green Papaya," which opens today at the Charles. In fact, one would be hard-pressed to recall a film more in love with the sensual evocation of the universe.Hung's account of a young peasant servant girl come to the big city of Saigon in 1951 to work at the house of a musician is unbelievably vivid: how things look, how they feel, how they smell. It's an amazing bit of movie imagining. He literally rubs you against the textures of existence -- the light in the air, the gelid humidity, the inflation of a frog's membranes as it breathes, the ,, pad of feet on mahogany floors -- that's astonishing.
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