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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
A swab of vinegar could provide a simple, inexpensive way to screen women for early signs of cervical cancer, the leading cause of cancer death among women in poor countries where Pap smears are not available.Reporting on a study in Zimbabwe, doctors from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the University of Zimbabwe said the test could lead thousands of women each year to life-saving treatments."This really offers the promise of prevention," said Dr. Paul D. Blumenthal, a Hopkins gynecologist who directed the study.
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NEWS
January 10, 2013
WEATHER: Sunny, with highs in the lower 50s . TRAFFIC: Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues. TOP NEWS Maryland schools rank No. 1 for fifth straight year : For the fifth year in a row, Maryland has the best public school system in America, according to rankings published Thursday by a leading education publication that gave the state high marks for overall student achievement. O'Malley predicts assault weapons ban will pass : Gov. Martin O'Malley predicted that Maryland will ban assault weapons during the General Assembly session that began Wednesday.
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NEWS
January 10, 2013
WEATHER: Sunny, with highs in the lower 50s . TRAFFIC: Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues. TOP NEWS Maryland schools rank No. 1 for fifth straight year : For the fifth year in a row, Maryland has the best public school system in America, according to rankings published Thursday by a leading education publication that gave the state high marks for overall student achievement. O'Malley predicts assault weapons ban will pass : Gov. Martin O'Malley predicted that Maryland will ban assault weapons during the General Assembly session that began Wednesday.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to screen for hard-to-detect endometrial and ovarian cancers in women using a routine Pap smear, a discovery they hope eventually could reduce the number of deaths caused by the deadly malignancies. The researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center hope the Pap smear, a procedure in which cells are scraped from the cervix and examined under a microscope, can catch the two cancers in early stages and allow for earlier treatment. The Pap test has dramatically improved detection of cervical cancer over the years, curbing deaths by 75 percent among those who are screened.
NEWS
February 19, 1992
The intention behind a new screening program to detect cancers among Maryland's low-income women is a good one, but it could fall short of the health-care goals it hopes to achieve if there isn't money available for treatment.The program, funded by a $15 million federal grant and $5 million in matching state funds over five years, will include education and outreach efforts to let women know about the importance of Pap smears and mammograms. The grants will also pay for those tests, for follow-up services and for quality-control monitoring.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Many women became used to having a Pap smear annually to check for cervical cancer, but recent recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force have updated the timeline. Now, most women will need the test every five years. Cancer experts now agree that that this can fully protect women, while cutting down on costs, false positive test results and side effects, said Dr. Amanda Nickles Fader, assistant professor of gynecologic oncology at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
HEALTH
January 11, 2010
The number of cervical cancer cases diagnosed annually has gone down markedly over the past 30 years, a drop attributed to cervical cytology screening (the Pap smear). The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recently changed its guidelines for cervical cancer screening. Dr. Diane Boykin of St. Agnes Hospital discusses what you need to know about the new guidelines. •The new guidelines state that all Pap smears can begin at age 21. This is a subtle change from the previous recommendation, which had screening begin by age 21 or one to three years after the onset of sexual activity.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | May 18, 1993
Some years ago I was involved in persuading the Maryland General Assembly to pass a law requiring that all women admitted to a hospital be offered a Pap test to screen for cervical cancer. We thought we had made a significant contribution to cervical cancer prevention. But the number of cervical cancer deaths in Maryland is still high. Of the 4,000 women in the United States who will die of cervical cancer this year, about 77 will be from Maryland. Ann Klassen, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and Dr. Neil Rosenshein, associate professor of gynecology and obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, have been looking at this problem, and I recently asked them about it.Q: Who is at risk for cervical cancer?
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | April 17, 1991
Even though they're at a greater risk than their daughters, middle-aged and elderly women often think like teen-agers about cervical cancer. They figure it just won't happen to them.But statistics show that kind of blind faith can be dangerous.While only a small number of women in their 20s are diagnosed with cervical cancer, the rate increases dramatically for women over 45.Older women also are more likely to die of the cancer, which can almost always be cured if detected early."For some reason, after age50 or so, when they're not in their childbearing years anymore, women don't think they need regular (screenings)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Thousands of women were diagnosed with cervical cancer this year, despite advances in testing and prevention. If left undiscovered and untreated, the cancer can be deadly, said gynecological oncologist Dr. Dwight D. Im, director for the Gynecologic Oncology Center at Mercy Medical Center. He answers questions ahead of National Cervical Cancer Screening Month and national Cervical Health Awareness Month in January. Question: Who gets cervical cancer, and how common is it? Answer: In the United States, cancer of the cervix (the lowest portion of a woman's uterus or womb)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | July 31, 2012
Women will have access to free health services for certain procedures under health care reform that go into affect tomorrow. The health benefits, a result of the Mikulski Women's Preventive Health Amendment, guarantee that women will receive, at no cost, an annual women's health exam to screen for the leading causes of death among women. It also requires all health plans to cover comprehensive women's preventive care and screenings with no copayments. Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski joined other Congressional Democrats Tuesday in announcing the new services.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Many women became used to having a Pap smear annually to check for cervical cancer, but recent recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force have updated the timeline. Now, most women will need the test every five years. Cancer experts now agree that that this can fully protect women, while cutting down on costs, false positive test results and side effects, said Dr. Amanda Nickles Fader, assistant professor of gynecologic oncology at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Thousands of women were diagnosed with cervical cancer this year, despite advances in testing and prevention. If left undiscovered and untreated, the cancer can be deadly, said gynecological oncologist Dr. Dwight D. Im, director for the Gynecologic Oncology Center at Mercy Medical Center. He answers questions ahead of National Cervical Cancer Screening Month and national Cervical Health Awareness Month in January. Question: Who gets cervical cancer, and how common is it? Answer: In the United States, cancer of the cervix (the lowest portion of a woman's uterus or womb)
HEALTH
January 11, 2010
The number of cervical cancer cases diagnosed annually has gone down markedly over the past 30 years, a drop attributed to cervical cytology screening (the Pap smear). The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recently changed its guidelines for cervical cancer screening. Dr. Diane Boykin of St. Agnes Hospital discusses what you need to know about the new guidelines. •The new guidelines state that all Pap smears can begin at age 21. This is a subtle change from the previous recommendation, which had screening begin by age 21 or one to three years after the onset of sexual activity.
NEWS
By Steve Almond and Steve Almond,Los Angeles Times | February 25, 2007
Finn Jon Clinch Random House / 292 pages / $23.95 Jon Clinch has staked himself to a stiff challenge in his debut novel: casting Mark Twain's monstrous creation Pap Finn - feckless father of Huck - as a leading man. The resulting book is dark and often gripping, though marred by stylistic excess and a shortage of pathos. I suspect the central academic achievement of Finn will be to transport the world's Twain scholars into a collective tizzy. Clinch has, as they say, taken liberties with the back story.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2004
As many as 10 million women who have had hysterectomies and who no longer have a cervix are still getting Pap tests, a new study finds. The screening Pap test looks for pre-cancerous cells in tissue scraped from a woman's cervix and can prevent what would otherwise be a common and deadly cancer. But testing most women without a cervix makes little sense, leads to false positives and wastes money, said Dr. Brenda E. Sirovich, a research associate at the Outcomes Group at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vt., and the study's lead author.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | January 31, 1995
Q: My doctor has just told me that I have a large tumor of the uterus and should have a hysterectomy. It is hard for me to understand how a large tumor could develop in my uterus when I have annual examinations and Pap tests. What is the danger of uterine tumors?A: There are three major types of uterine tumors.Most common are tumors of the muscle wall of the uterus, referred to as myomas or "fibroids." These tumors occur in premenopausal women in whom they are malignant only in very rare instances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and By Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
Every life has a defining moment, a point when a single choice changes everything that follows. It comes early in some lives, late in others. That one important choice is the theme that links the six novels reviewed below. For 15-year-old Steven Parker, the character at the center of More Than Enough by John Fulton (Picador USA, 192 pages, $13), that moment is painful. When he and his sister take a walk into the nicer part of their Salt Lake City neighborhood, he is beaten by a gang of neighborhood kids because he's not Mormon.
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