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NEWS
April 16, 2006
Embroideries By Marjane Satrapi Pantheon / 144 pages / $10.95 The remarkable Iranian-born graphic novelist who created the Persepolis books returns with this poignant, nuanced and bawdy look at how different generations of Iranian women gathered for a social occasion regard sex and relationships with men.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
Ray Lewis is the oldest Raven - he turns 37 on Tuesday - but as one of The Baltimore Sun's top 10 all-time Maryland athletes, he's just a kid. Eight of his peers are Hall of Famers in their respective sports. Seven were stars before Lewis was born. The breadth of their accomplishments is not lost on the Ravens linebacker. "Look at the guys on that list, [Johnny] Unitas  and  Brooks [Robinson], and the impact they had. They were staples in this city, known as much for what they did off the field as on it," Lewis said.
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NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,Chicago Tribune | February 4, 1996
"Breaking the News: How the Media Undermine American Democracy," by James Fallows. Pantheon. 296 pages. $23 This is a disturbingly thoughtful book. The author, Washington editor of the Atlantic Monthly, has fashioned a powerful indictment of media more inclined toward exploitation than explanation, and pontificating rather than probing."The message of today's news coverage is often that the world cannot be understood, shaped or controlled, but merely endured or held at arm's length." What is too often missing in daily reporting - especially on television - is a sense of context, the connecting points that explain the broader relevance of an event.
SPORTS
October 13, 2010
  Mt. Rushmore-worthy Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Winning with the Yankees is one thing. Winning with the Braves is another. Winning when players grumble about you is one thing. Winning when players universally respect — and often genuinely love you — is another. Bobby Cox did it the right way. That's why he was able to manage 21 seasons with the Braves, a period in which the other National League teams ripped through 106 managers. There is no question he is one of the greatest managers ever.
NEWS
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
Surveillance Jonathan Raban Pantheon / 258 pages / $24 Cross Lincoln Steffens on the Russian Revolution ("I have seen the future and it works") with Pogo ("We have met the enemy and he is us"), and you pretty much come out at Jonathan Raban's new novel. "I have met the future and it's the enemy and it's us," in other words. This is the dystopian theme of Surveillance, a current that does not so much run beneath the fiction as flood it. The compass virtually pre-empts the ship, eclipsing such features of an ocean trip as sunlight on cobalt waves, storm clouds on black ones, salt air, flying fish, seasickness and the onboard affair.
NEWS
By LIZZIE SKURNICK and LIZZIE SKURNICK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
The Whole World Over Julia Glass Pantheon / 528 pages / $25.95 One might think that a novel spanning the art of cookery and Sept. 11 (or, as the Library of Congress has it, "1. Women cooks-Fiction. 2. September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001-Fiction.") might take its title with a decent pinch of salt as well. But Julia Glass' The Whole World Over, the follow-up to the National Book Award-winning Three Junes, means to live up to its title, double connotation and all. It's a tall order, and, like the "tent-sized" cake that Greenie, the novel's cook in question, bakes for her boss' nuptials, the book is multilayered, dense - and slathered with an ill-advised layer of frosting.
NEWS
By Matthew Price and Matthew Price,Los Angeles Times | October 15, 2006
The Architecture of Happiness Alain de Botton Pantheon / 286 pages / $25 Alain de Botton is a clever writer. His ambition, it seems, is to get himself into every section of your local bookstore, and he's succeeding. A generalist on a mission, he has already done literary criticism (How Proust Can Change Your Life), philosophy (The Consolations of Philosophy), travel (The Art of Travel), plus a few novels with such cutesy titles as Kiss & Tell and On Love. He has now hopscotched to architecture; a book on opera can't be too far off. De Botton is high-falutin' but user-friendly - his trick, a la Oprah, is to throw in a feel-good twist, though his relentless geniality gets to be a bit much.
NEWS
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | October 28, 2007
Ghost By Alan Lightman Pantheon / 248 pages / $23 The Trappist mystic Thomas Merton once remarked that, if he were walking down the street and a miracle occurred on the sidewalk in front of him, he'd cross to the other side and do his best to ignore it. Merton wasn't expressing skepticism about the existence of the miraculous, simply a reservation about its relevance to the lives of men and women, who must work out even their salvation in the world...
NEWS
By Art Winslow and Art Winslow,Chicago Tribune | May 13, 2007
Fellow Travelers By Thomas Mallon Pantheon / 356 pages / $25 In Many Are the Crimes, historian Ellen Schrecker's examination of McCarthyism in America, she sketches the growth of post-World War II loyalty programs at departments such as State and Commerce, whose employees were subject to repeated attacks, most prominently from the Capitol Hill redoubts of Sens. Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin and Pat McCarran of Nevada. Public Law 733, passed in 1950, had authorized 11 departments and agencies to dismiss employees summarily if they were deemed security risks, and President Harry S. Truman signed an executive order the following year that replaced the "reasonable grounds" standard for considering someone disloyal with a less-rigorous threshold of "reasonable doubt."
NEWS
By Marianne Means | January 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The common wisdom holds that there are no modern-day heroes in public life. Politicians do not become statesmen until they die and are out of competition. The longer they have been gone, the more fondly we think of them. But without heroes, policy debates can be pretty dull. So in the eternal search to find something interesting about the presidential contest, the media are experimenting with comparisons between the current four leading candidates and past elected superstars.
NEWS
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | October 28, 2007
Ghost By Alan Lightman Pantheon / 248 pages / $23 The Trappist mystic Thomas Merton once remarked that, if he were walking down the street and a miracle occurred on the sidewalk in front of him, he'd cross to the other side and do his best to ignore it. Merton wasn't expressing skepticism about the existence of the miraculous, simply a reservation about its relevance to the lives of men and women, who must work out even their salvation in the world...
NEWS
By Art Winslow and Art Winslow,Chicago Tribune | May 13, 2007
Fellow Travelers By Thomas Mallon Pantheon / 356 pages / $25 In Many Are the Crimes, historian Ellen Schrecker's examination of McCarthyism in America, she sketches the growth of post-World War II loyalty programs at departments such as State and Commerce, whose employees were subject to repeated attacks, most prominently from the Capitol Hill redoubts of Sens. Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin and Pat McCarran of Nevada. Public Law 733, passed in 1950, had authorized 11 departments and agencies to dismiss employees summarily if they were deemed security risks, and President Harry S. Truman signed an executive order the following year that replaced the "reasonable grounds" standard for considering someone disloyal with a less-rigorous threshold of "reasonable doubt."
NEWS
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
Surveillance Jonathan Raban Pantheon / 258 pages / $24 Cross Lincoln Steffens on the Russian Revolution ("I have seen the future and it works") with Pogo ("We have met the enemy and he is us"), and you pretty much come out at Jonathan Raban's new novel. "I have met the future and it's the enemy and it's us," in other words. This is the dystopian theme of Surveillance, a current that does not so much run beneath the fiction as flood it. The compass virtually pre-empts the ship, eclipsing such features of an ocean trip as sunlight on cobalt waves, storm clouds on black ones, salt air, flying fish, seasickness and the onboard affair.
NEWS
By Matthew Price and Matthew Price,Los Angeles Times | October 15, 2006
The Architecture of Happiness Alain de Botton Pantheon / 286 pages / $25 Alain de Botton is a clever writer. His ambition, it seems, is to get himself into every section of your local bookstore, and he's succeeding. A generalist on a mission, he has already done literary criticism (How Proust Can Change Your Life), philosophy (The Consolations of Philosophy), travel (The Art of Travel), plus a few novels with such cutesy titles as Kiss & Tell and On Love. He has now hopscotched to architecture; a book on opera can't be too far off. De Botton is high-falutin' but user-friendly - his trick, a la Oprah, is to throw in a feel-good twist, though his relentless geniality gets to be a bit much.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
For Freeman Williams, there's nothing better than a bad movie. The flat acting, poor lighting, cheap sets, fake blood, inane plots - what's not to love? So Williams founded a Web site to review bad movies and extol their virtues at length. The best bad movies, he said, are entertaining in spite of themselves. They make you feel superior and give you something to laugh at. They are, he said, "the stuff of classical tragedy." But as moviemaking gets more expensive, and studios test market films to death, good bad movies are disappearing, say their fans.
NEWS
By LIZZIE SKURNICK and LIZZIE SKURNICK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
The Whole World Over Julia Glass Pantheon / 528 pages / $25.95 One might think that a novel spanning the art of cookery and Sept. 11 (or, as the Library of Congress has it, "1. Women cooks-Fiction. 2. September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001-Fiction.") might take its title with a decent pinch of salt as well. But Julia Glass' The Whole World Over, the follow-up to the National Book Award-winning Three Junes, means to live up to its title, double connotation and all. It's a tall order, and, like the "tent-sized" cake that Greenie, the novel's cook in question, bakes for her boss' nuptials, the book is multilayered, dense - and slathered with an ill-advised layer of frosting.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 15, 2002
BOSTON -- Every year we celebrate Aug. 26, the anniversary of women's suffrage, in our time-honored tradition. Our one-woman jury assembles to dispense the Equal Rites Awards, those coveted prizes given to people who labored mightily over the last 12 months to set back the cause of women. What a year it's been since last we met. In Afghanistan, women have begun shedding burqas and showing their faces. In America, women are injecting Botox and freezing their faces. In corporate life, the women of Enron, etc., make it seem as if whistle-blowing is in the female DNA. In the CEO's office, Martha Stewart is making a mess of her Living.
SPORTS
October 13, 2010
  Mt. Rushmore-worthy Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Winning with the Yankees is one thing. Winning with the Braves is another. Winning when players grumble about you is one thing. Winning when players universally respect — and often genuinely love you — is another. Bobby Cox did it the right way. That's why he was able to manage 21 seasons with the Braves, a period in which the other National League teams ripped through 106 managers. There is no question he is one of the greatest managers ever.
NEWS
April 16, 2006
Embroideries By Marjane Satrapi Pantheon / 144 pages / $10.95 The remarkable Iranian-born graphic novelist who created the Persepolis books returns with this poignant, nuanced and bawdy look at how different generations of Iranian women gathered for a social occasion regard sex and relationships with men.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 15, 2002
BOSTON -- Every year we celebrate Aug. 26, the anniversary of women's suffrage, in our time-honored tradition. Our one-woman jury assembles to dispense the Equal Rites Awards, those coveted prizes given to people who labored mightily over the last 12 months to set back the cause of women. What a year it's been since last we met. In Afghanistan, women have begun shedding burqas and showing their faces. In America, women are injecting Botox and freezing their faces. In corporate life, the women of Enron, etc., make it seem as if whistle-blowing is in the female DNA. In the CEO's office, Martha Stewart is making a mess of her Living.
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