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Panic Disorder

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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
The 6 o'clock newscast wasn't half over when the panic descended. Once again, Denise Koch didn't see it coming. Although she never perspired under the TV lights, sweat now trickled down her neck. She stared at the TelePrompTer, struggling to keep the words from becoming a fuzzy jumble. The studio was spinning.Sad thoughts had brought this on, she told herself. Thoughts of delivering WJZ's news without her close friend and colleague Al Sanders, who was dying of lung cancer. And thoughts of being apart from her twin infant daughters, who had gotten out of the hospital barely a month before.
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By Holly Selby | January 3, 2008
Many of us have experienced a pounding heart, sweaty palms, a feeling of constricted breathing -- perhaps before giving a speech, getting on an airplane, asking for a raise. But for some people, those same symptoms are accompanied by dizziness, shortness of breath and even a sense of impending doom. These people may be suffering from a panic attack, says Dr. Elias Shaya, chief of psychiatry at Good Samaritan Hospital. And although panic attacks can be potentially disabling, they also are considered treatable.
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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | August 18, 1992
Q: Although I am only 25, two episodes during the last month convinced me I was having a heart attack. Each started suddenly with shortness of breath and dizziness; heart palpitations, chest pain and sweating soon followed. During the last attack I went to an emergency room where the doctors assured me it was not a heart attack but did not tell me what was wrong. Can you explain these episodes?A: It is hard to be certain, but it sounds as though you are having panic attacks. Your symptoms are typical of such attacks, and they generally begin before the age of 30.Attacks are characterized by 5 to 30 minutes of intense dread along with a number of physical symptoms, some of which do mimic a heart attack: difficulty breathing, a pounding, rapid heart beat, chest pain, a choking sensation, sweating, headache, dizziness, blurred vision, nausea and numbness or tingling of the hands and feet.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | November 20, 2007
Nancy Pine first began to worry when she realized that her poodle had been at the groomer for five hours - more than twice as long as Rajah's typical visits to be shampooed and clipped and coiffed. That concern multiplied when, two hours after Pine called to check on her dog, the groomer's fiance knocked on her door and deposited Rajah on the floor of her Baldwin home. "He couldn't even hold his head up. He was barely conscious," Pine recalled yesterday. The poodle died about 10 hours later at the Falls Road Animal Hospital and an animal autopsy - called a necropsy - revealed that he had suffered acute liver injuries, broken ribs, and internal bleeding and might have been strangled, according to court records.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
The 47-year-old professional woman wasn't sleeping well. She was skipping menstrual periods and fighting the combined forces of anxiety and depression. By the time she was examined by reproductive endocrinologist Marian Damewood, she was taking Prozac and Xanax to manage her mood swings.Like a lot of women in their 40s -- many of whom must deal with children, careers and their changing bodies -- the patient said she did not understand her symptoms, but couldn't afford to keep "losing it."A simple blood test revealed that her symptoms were related to perimenopause -- the transitional years leading up to menopause.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | January 3, 2008
Many of us have experienced a pounding heart, sweaty palms, a feeling of constricted breathing -- perhaps before giving a speech, getting on an airplane, asking for a raise. But for some people, those same symptoms are accompanied by dizziness, shortness of breath and even a sense of impending doom. These people may be suffering from a panic attack, says Dr. Elias Shaya, chief of psychiatry at Good Samaritan Hospital. And although panic attacks can be potentially disabling, they also are considered treatable.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 9, 1990
Several serious mental health disorders traditionally viewed as illnesses of adulthood are more likely to begin during adolescence rather than any other time of life, a study by the National Institute of Mental Health has found.The study supports the belief of many experts that a greater emphasis should be placed on diagnosing and treating mental disorders among individuals under age 20."These findings underscore the importance of detecting and treating mental illnesses and substance abuse early, before they ruin a person's life," said the institute's director, Lewis L. Judd.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 28, 1991
BETHESDA -- Most Americans who suffer from panic disorder aren't receiving promising treatments, in part because of doctors who are ignorant about the problem and fail to recognize its symptoms, a panel of mental health authorities said yesterday.The disorder is marked by episodes of intense fear accompanied by physical symptoms such as a racing heart, dizziness, nausea, abdominal pain and shortness of breath. The bouts usually occur without any realistic threat, although the person may feel threatened by particular environments, such as a crowded elevator, a busy street or a shopping mall.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | July 31, 1991
The plane waiting to take her family to a vacation in Canada was about to boost its engines when Christina Joanna Suter realized her brother had fled.Stephen Suter, then 19, suffered from an anxiety disorder that led to his suicide last month, but it was the vacation episode that first alerted his sister. She found the young man on his way out the airport, but talked him back.Eight years later, Christina Suter and her aunt, Ginny Lee Young,are talking to others with anxiety and panic disorders through a backyard support group.
NEWS
October 24, 2001
WITH ANTHRAX confirmed as the killer of two postal workers in Washington, Americans and their government can no longer think of bioterrorism as an abstraction. Anthrax spores were directed initially at print and electronic media outlets. But anyone who gets mail, not to speak of those who deliver it, falls within the sights of indiscriminate evildoers. We are reluctant to think of ourselves as such, but we are all combatants and potential targets. We are hurtling along the path of a new consciousness.
NEWS
October 24, 2001
WITH ANTHRAX confirmed as the killer of two postal workers in Washington, Americans and their government can no longer think of bioterrorism as an abstraction. Anthrax spores were directed initially at print and electronic media outlets. But anyone who gets mail, not to speak of those who deliver it, falls within the sights of indiscriminate evildoers. We are reluctant to think of ourselves as such, but we are all combatants and potential targets. We are hurtling along the path of a new consciousness.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
The 6 o'clock newscast wasn't half over when the panic descended. Once again, Denise Koch didn't see it coming. Although she never perspired under the TV lights, sweat now trickled down her neck. She stared at the TelePrompTer, struggling to keep the words from becoming a fuzzy jumble. The studio was spinning.Sad thoughts had brought this on, she told herself. Thoughts of delivering WJZ's news without her close friend and colleague Al Sanders, who was dying of lung cancer. And thoughts of being apart from her twin infant daughters, who had gotten out of the hospital barely a month before.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
The 47-year-old professional woman wasn't sleeping well. She was skipping menstrual periods and fighting the combined forces of anxiety and depression. By the time she was examined by reproductive endocrinologist Marian Damewood, she was taking Prozac and Xanax to manage her mood swings.Like a lot of women in their 40s -- many of whom must deal with children, careers and their changing bodies -- the patient said she did not understand her symptoms, but couldn't afford to keep "losing it."A simple blood test revealed that her symptoms were related to perimenopause -- the transitional years leading up to menopause.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | August 18, 1992
Q: Although I am only 25, two episodes during the last month convinced me I was having a heart attack. Each started suddenly with shortness of breath and dizziness; heart palpitations, chest pain and sweating soon followed. During the last attack I went to an emergency room where the doctors assured me it was not a heart attack but did not tell me what was wrong. Can you explain these episodes?A: It is hard to be certain, but it sounds as though you are having panic attacks. Your symptoms are typical of such attacks, and they generally begin before the age of 30.Attacks are characterized by 5 to 30 minutes of intense dread along with a number of physical symptoms, some of which do mimic a heart attack: difficulty breathing, a pounding, rapid heart beat, chest pain, a choking sensation, sweating, headache, dizziness, blurred vision, nausea and numbness or tingling of the hands and feet.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 28, 1991
BETHESDA -- Most Americans who suffer from panic disorder aren't receiving promising treatments, in part because of doctors who are ignorant about the problem and fail to recognize its symptoms, a panel of mental health authorities said yesterday.The disorder is marked by episodes of intense fear accompanied by physical symptoms such as a racing heart, dizziness, nausea, abdominal pain and shortness of breath. The bouts usually occur without any realistic threat, although the person may feel threatened by particular environments, such as a crowded elevator, a busy street or a shopping mall.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | July 31, 1991
The plane waiting to take her family to a vacation in Canada was about to boost its engines when Christina Joanna Suter realized her brother had fled.Stephen Suter, then 19, suffered from an anxiety disorder that led to his suicide last month, but it was the vacation episode that first alerted his sister. She found the young man on his way out the airport, but talked him back.Eight years later, Christina Suter and her aunt, Ginny Lee Young,are talking to others with anxiety and panic disorders through a backyard support group.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | November 20, 2007
Nancy Pine first began to worry when she realized that her poodle had been at the groomer for five hours - more than twice as long as Rajah's typical visits to be shampooed and clipped and coiffed. That concern multiplied when, two hours after Pine called to check on her dog, the groomer's fiance knocked on her door and deposited Rajah on the floor of her Baldwin home. "He couldn't even hold his head up. He was barely conscious," Pine recalled yesterday. The poodle died about 10 hours later at the Falls Road Animal Hospital and an animal autopsy - called a necropsy - revealed that he had suffered acute liver injuries, broken ribs, and internal bleeding and might have been strangled, according to court records.
FEATURES
By Patricia Anstett and Patricia Anstett,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 9, 1993
Research has uncovered a possible reason why women are more susceptible than men to depression and autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis: estrogen, the female hormone.Dr. George Chrousos and scientists at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development find that a gene gives directions to a corticotropin-releasing hormone, or CRH, which is important to the body's response to stress.Estrogen partially controls this gene. "Estrogen itself isn't the cause. It participates in the process," Dr. Chrousos says.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 9, 1990
Several serious mental health disorders traditionally viewed as illnesses of adulthood are more likely to begin during adolescence rather than any other time of life, a study by the National Institute of Mental Health has found.The study supports the belief of many experts that a greater emphasis should be placed on diagnosing and treating mental disorders among individuals under age 20."These findings underscore the importance of detecting and treating mental illnesses and substance abuse early, before they ruin a person's life," said the institute's director, Lewis L. Judd.
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