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Panic Attacks

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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | August 18, 1992
Q: Although I am only 25, two episodes during the last month convinced me I was having a heart attack. Each started suddenly with shortness of breath and dizziness; heart palpitations, chest pain and sweating soon followed. During the last attack I went to an emergency room where the doctors assured me it was not a heart attack but did not tell me what was wrong. Can you explain these episodes?A: It is hard to be certain, but it sounds as though you are having panic attacks. Your symptoms are typical of such attacks, and they generally begin before the age of 30.Attacks are characterized by 5 to 30 minutes of intense dread along with a number of physical symptoms, some of which do mimic a heart attack: difficulty breathing, a pounding, rapid heart beat, chest pain, a choking sensation, sweating, headache, dizziness, blurred vision, nausea and numbness or tingling of the hands and feet.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 27, 2008
Wanted "goes postal" with wireless speed. It's a tall tale of skyscraper proportions: the gory story of a put-upon accountant who discovers that he's the son of a top assassin in a secret world of super-assassins. The film pulls you by the scruff of the neck and makes you thankful for it. It releases every ounce of pent-up frustration and rage in your body. The Russian director, Timur Bekmambetov, gives the action scenes full-frontal bravura. He roots the antihero's adventures in scabrous reality and then bends it as if with his arms, neck and teeth.
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By San Francisco Chronicle | September 16, 1990
Researchers studying the effects of cocaine use are finding new evidence that the drug can cause lasting chemical changes in the brain and trigger panic attacks and episodes resembling seizures long after drug use has stopped.Electrical studies show curious brain wave patterns in patients who suffer overwhelming attacks of panic and anxiety after a long history of periodic cocaine binges.In many ways, the researchers say, those patterns resemble brain-wave tracings created by the distorted electrical signals thatbrain cells emit when epilepsy patients undergo seizures.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | January 3, 2008
Many of us have experienced a pounding heart, sweaty palms, a feeling of constricted breathing -- perhaps before giving a speech, getting on an airplane, asking for a raise. But for some people, those same symptoms are accompanied by dizziness, shortness of breath and even a sense of impending doom. These people may be suffering from a panic attack, says Dr. Elias Shaya, chief of psychiatry at Good Samaritan Hospital. And although panic attacks can be potentially disabling, they also are considered treatable.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1998
On a bitter December night in 1987, Army Pfc. Lisa Conti and another female soldier hastened through the village of Tongduchan below the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea for a supper of spicy kimchi and rice.Taking a familiar shortcut, they were jumped from behind by four Korean men, overpowered and shoved into a car. The women were driven to an isolated spot where they were tortured with lighted cigarettes and raped.That began an excruciating, 10-year odyssey for Conti that has included a string of hospital stays, suicide attempts, nightmares and crippling panic attacks.
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Columnist | November 3, 2006
I think the thing that has made me feel the oldest lately is realizing that The Real World is entering its 18th season. Yes, 18th. This season, which takes place in Denver, officially kicks off Nov. 22, but MTV is promoting the heck out of it with a casting special spotlighting the seven personalities it's exploring (or will it be exploiting?) this time around. There's a woman who suffers from panic attacks, a guy who extricated himself from a gang, a Baptist kid who feels conflicted about his sexuality and, of course, a bunch of people who talk all about how much they like to "make out" and "hook up."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 17, 2005
I've been reading about athletes taking steroids. It confuses me that people think this is terrible. My doctor prescribes Flonase for my allergies. This is an inhaled steroid. What's the difference? Some athletes have been abusing anabolic steroids. These are male hormones related to testosterone. Corticosteroids, like Flonase or prednisone, are related to cortisone, a natural anti-inflammatory compound. They are used to treat conditions such as asthma, allergy or arthritis. The benefits and risks of corticosteroids are completely different from those of anabolic steroids.
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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | June 14, 1998
Q. I hope you can help me, because my career is on the line. I was recently promoted to a position that requires me to make periodic presentations to our senior staff and to other organizations.The problem is that public speaking makes me very nervous. My doctor prescribed Xanax to calm me down. It does relax me, but during my last presentation I forgot the name of a team member I was introducing. It was incredibly embarrassing, and I fear my memory is getting worse. I have also had panic attacks for the first time in my life and wonder if they are linked to Xanax.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 28, 1991
BETHESDA -- Most Americans who suffer from panic disorder aren't receiving promising treatments, in part because of doctors who are ignorant about the problem and fail to recognize its symptoms, a panel of mental health authorities said yesterday.The disorder is marked by episodes of intense fear accompanied by physical symptoms such as a racing heart, dizziness, nausea, abdominal pain and shortness of breath. The bouts usually occur without any realistic threat, although the person may feel threatened by particular environments, such as a crowded elevator, a busy street or a shopping mall.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 27, 2008
Wanted "goes postal" with wireless speed. It's a tall tale of skyscraper proportions: the gory story of a put-upon accountant who discovers that he's the son of a top assassin in a secret world of super-assassins. The film pulls you by the scruff of the neck and makes you thankful for it. It releases every ounce of pent-up frustration and rage in your body. The Russian director, Timur Bekmambetov, gives the action scenes full-frontal bravura. He roots the antihero's adventures in scabrous reality and then bends it as if with his arms, neck and teeth.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Columnist | November 3, 2006
I think the thing that has made me feel the oldest lately is realizing that The Real World is entering its 18th season. Yes, 18th. This season, which takes place in Denver, officially kicks off Nov. 22, but MTV is promoting the heck out of it with a casting special spotlighting the seven personalities it's exploring (or will it be exploiting?) this time around. There's a woman who suffers from panic attacks, a guy who extricated himself from a gang, a Baptist kid who feels conflicted about his sexuality and, of course, a bunch of people who talk all about how much they like to "make out" and "hook up."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 17, 2005
I've been reading about athletes taking steroids. It confuses me that people think this is terrible. My doctor prescribes Flonase for my allergies. This is an inhaled steroid. What's the difference? Some athletes have been abusing anabolic steroids. These are male hormones related to testosterone. Corticosteroids, like Flonase or prednisone, are related to cortisone, a natural anti-inflammatory compound. They are used to treat conditions such as asthma, allergy or arthritis. The benefits and risks of corticosteroids are completely different from those of anabolic steroids.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | December 3, 2004
Carol Brown is 54 now, healthy and happy. But until her early 40s, her life was one panic attack after another. The first occurred when she was 16, in an elevator. Out of the blue, said Brown, "my heart started racing, my hands were sweating, my breathing was shallow. I thought I was going to die. I didn't tell anybody. I thought I was losing my mind. It lasted maybe a minute, maybe a minute and a half, but it was enough to begin the pattern of events." That pattern is horribly familiar to the 2.4 million Americans who get panic attacks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
FORT CARSON, Colo. - Not since the Vietnam War has the Army punished a soldier for being too scared to do his duty. But tomorrow, Staff Sgt. Georg-Andreas Pogany will appear before a military court here to face charges of cowardice. The Army says he is guilty of "cowardly conduct as a result of fear" and not performing his duties as an interrogator for a squad of Green Berets in Samarra, Iraq. But Pogany says he did not run from the enemy or disobey orders. The only thing he is guilty of, he says, is asking for help for a panic attack.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 24, 2001
WASHNGTON - The drive by Congress to jump-start the sputtering economy seems to be running out of gas. Legislation to help reverse the economy's slide is the last item of unfinished business on the congressional agenda shaped in response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. But the measure appears to have lost the aura of urgency that may be required to break a partisan impasse and enact it before this year's congressional session ends in a few weeks. "I would say the chances of passage are down to 50-50 from about 3-to-1 a couple months ago," said Robert Reischauer, a former director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | June 14, 1998
Q. I hope you can help me, because my career is on the line. I was recently promoted to a position that requires me to make periodic presentations to our senior staff and to other organizations.The problem is that public speaking makes me very nervous. My doctor prescribed Xanax to calm me down. It does relax me, but during my last presentation I forgot the name of a team member I was introducing. It was incredibly embarrassing, and I fear my memory is getting worse. I have also had panic attacks for the first time in my life and wonder if they are linked to Xanax.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | January 3, 2008
Many of us have experienced a pounding heart, sweaty palms, a feeling of constricted breathing -- perhaps before giving a speech, getting on an airplane, asking for a raise. But for some people, those same symptoms are accompanied by dizziness, shortness of breath and even a sense of impending doom. These people may be suffering from a panic attack, says Dr. Elias Shaya, chief of psychiatry at Good Samaritan Hospital. And although panic attacks can be potentially disabling, they also are considered treatable.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | December 3, 2004
Carol Brown is 54 now, healthy and happy. But until her early 40s, her life was one panic attack after another. The first occurred when she was 16, in an elevator. Out of the blue, said Brown, "my heart started racing, my hands were sweating, my breathing was shallow. I thought I was going to die. I didn't tell anybody. I thought I was losing my mind. It lasted maybe a minute, maybe a minute and a half, but it was enough to begin the pattern of events." That pattern is horribly familiar to the 2.4 million Americans who get panic attacks.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1998
On a bitter December night in 1987, Army Pfc. Lisa Conti and another female soldier hastened through the village of Tongduchan below the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea for a supper of spicy kimchi and rice.Taking a familiar shortcut, they were jumped from behind by four Korean men, overpowered and shoved into a car. The women were driven to an isolated spot where they were tortured with lighted cigarettes and raped.That began an excruciating, 10-year odyssey for Conti that has included a string of hospital stays, suicide attempts, nightmares and crippling panic attacks.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | August 18, 1992
Q: Although I am only 25, two episodes during the last month convinced me I was having a heart attack. Each started suddenly with shortness of breath and dizziness; heart palpitations, chest pain and sweating soon followed. During the last attack I went to an emergency room where the doctors assured me it was not a heart attack but did not tell me what was wrong. Can you explain these episodes?A: It is hard to be certain, but it sounds as though you are having panic attacks. Your symptoms are typical of such attacks, and they generally begin before the age of 30.Attacks are characterized by 5 to 30 minutes of intense dread along with a number of physical symptoms, some of which do mimic a heart attack: difficulty breathing, a pounding, rapid heart beat, chest pain, a choking sensation, sweating, headache, dizziness, blurred vision, nausea and numbness or tingling of the hands and feet.
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