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NEWS
August 12, 1994
"Clinton is very bright and politically astute, but the White House operation created a perception that he wasn't competent to do the job." Who said that? None other than Tony Coelho, who has just been tapped by a close friend and fellow Californian, White House chief of staff Leon Panetta, to take over the task of demonstrating that Democrats are indeed capable of governing and that President Clinton is indeed competent.Newspaper headlines and Mr. Clinton's decline in public opinion polls since Mr. Panetta's appointment six weeks ago hardly suggest there is much improvement.
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NEWS
September 23, 2013
Recently, President Barack Obama's first two defense secretaries, Robert M. Gates and Leon E. Panetta, appearing at a forum at Southern Methodist University on September 17, spoke out on the Syria issue and were quite critical of Mr. Obama's handling of it. Yet here it is days later and The Sun has provided no coverage of that event for its readers. Don't want the word to get out that even the former appointees of your protected one disparage his inept handling of foreign affairs?
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NEWS
By Sandy Grady | August 15, 1994
Washington--FOR A NEW chief of staff who made a big deal out of bringing discipline to the White House, Leon Panetta stuck his foot in his mouth.Walking up the U.S. House steps on his way to lobby Democrats before a pivotal vote on the crime bill, Mr. Panetta made the year's dumbest political wisecrack."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
When Maryland National Guard Capt. Cara Kupcho first enlisted in the military 18 years ago, she wanted to drive a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, a 30-ton, armor-busting tank. "I like things that go boom," she explained Thursday. "I like tanks. " But as a woman, Kupcho was barred from joining any of the armored units that used the vehicles. She became a mechanic instead, able to maintain tanks, but prohibited from driving them into battle. Outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced plans Thursday to end the long-standing prohibition on servicewomen in direct combat roles, opening hundreds of thousands of jobs formerly limited to men. "In our democracy, I believe it is the responsibility of every citizen to protect the nation," Panetta said.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | May 20, 1991
This was not your garden variety lacrosse matchup. It was ace against ace. Your best against mine. Tony Seaman's best attackman against Roy Simmons' best defenseman.It was this: Johns Hopkins' Matt Panetta vs. Syracuse's Pat McCabe.Seaman and Simmons would not distill it that far, instead spreading the blame and credit. But there is no question that Panetta vs. McCabe was one key to fifth-seeded Syracuse's 11-8 victory over No. 4 Johns Hopkins in an NCAA tournament quarterfinal yesterday before 10,723 at Homewood.
NEWS
January 12, 1993
President-elect Clinton should drop his election-year pledge of a middle-class tax cut before he takes office. Two of his major opponents in the Democratic primaries -- Paul Tsongas and Tom Harkin -- denounced the idea from its inception, and they were right. It makes little difference that President Bush used phony figures to underestimate the deficit during the campaign. His numbers, like those projected by Governor Clinton, were suspect all along. Both candidates made promises they couldn't deliver on.Mr.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 8, 2009
President-elect Barack Obama secured the support of Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a California Democrat, for his choice to head the CIA yesterday, significantly improving the odds that former California congressman Leon E. Panetta will be the next chief of the spy service. Feinstein, who as chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee will preside over Panetta's confirmation hearing, said yesterday that she had spoken with Panetta by phone and that she would support his confirmation. "I believe all systems are go," she said in an interview at the Capitol.
NEWS
By Greg Miller, Christi Parsons and David Wood and Greg Miller, Christi Parsons and David Wood,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 6, 2009
WASHINGTON - President-elect Barack Obama has selected Leon E. Panetta to serve as the next director of the CIA, apparently concluding that a spy chief who understands politics might be more important than one with deep experience in intelligence matters. The surprise pick of Panetta, a former congressman and Clinton administration official, would give Obama a CIA director with unquestioned loyalty to the White House and an experienced managerial hand to steer the new administration away from intelligence scandals.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- All summer, Dee Dee Myers was rumored to be on the verge of being pushed out as President Clinton's press secretary. Yesterday, after an exhaustive search that lasted nearly three months, White House Chief of Staff Leon E. Panetta announced her successor: Dee Dee Myers."
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 7, 2009
WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama's nominee to head the CIA, Leon E. Panetta, said yesterday that he intends to test the claims by current agency officials that coercive interrogation methods were effective in getting terrorism suspects to talk. Panetta's comments were the latest indication that the administration might restore some of the CIA's authority to use interrogation techniques that go beyond those allowed for the U.S. military. But Panetta stressed that he would also examine the "downside" of using coercive methods and that the agency would operate within the law. Last month, Obama signed executive orders to abolish harsh interrogation methods and close the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta will end the long-standing prohibition on women serving in direct combat, Pentagon officials said Wednesday, opening hundreds of thousands of military jobs previously closed to female service members. Panetta and Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, will announce the end of the so-called combat exclusion policy Thursday, officials said. The move is expected to take years to implement fully. Army Staff Sgt. Jennifer Hunt welcomed the decision.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
As a woman in the Army, Staff Sgt. Jennifer Hunt is barred from serving in the infantry. But that didn't stop commanders in Afghanistan from tapping her when they needed a female soldier to accompany men on their door-kicking missions. Hunt's job on those house-to-house raids was to search any women and girls they came across. Not having trained with the teams, she says, made the work more dangerous. "The infantry operates together," she said. "Then I get kind of dropped in on them, and I don't know what their operating procedures are. If 'X' happens, what is their reaction to it?"
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
With Osama bin Laden dead, the war in Iraq over and the war in Afghanistan winding down, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told graduating midshipmen Tuesday to prepare themselves for "one of the key projects" of their generation: building American strength in the Asia-Pacific region. "America's future prosperity and security are tied to our ability to advance peace and security along the arc extending from the Western Pacific and East Asia into the Indian Ocean and South Asia," he told the Class of 2012 during the graduation ceremony at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | March 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - CIA Director Leon E. Panetta has chosen Republican former Sen. Warren B. Rudman as a special adviser, turning to a respected politician to help guide the agency through a congressional investigation of the CIA's interrogation program. The decision represents an unusual step for the CIA, which has faced similar probes in recent years without enlisting such high-profile help. But the move reflects a recognition of the stakes of a Senate inquiry into one of the agency's most controversial programs in recent years, as well as the political instincts of its new director.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 7, 2009
WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama's nominee to head the CIA, Leon E. Panetta, said yesterday that he intends to test the claims by current agency officials that coercive interrogation methods were effective in getting terrorism suspects to talk. Panetta's comments were the latest indication that the administration might restore some of the CIA's authority to use interrogation techniques that go beyond those allowed for the U.S. military. But Panetta stressed that he would also examine the "downside" of using coercive methods and that the agency would operate within the law. Last month, Obama signed executive orders to abolish harsh interrogation methods and close the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington bureau | January 10, 2009
WASHINGTON - With the introduction of President-elect Barack Obama's intelligence team yesterday, the United States is poised to enter what might be considered the second phase in the counterterrorism campaign launched after the Sept. 11 attacks. Obama and his spy chief nominees have promised a break with the policies of the Bush administration largely by focusing attention on what they intend to undo - including shutting down the Guantanamo Bay prison facility and ending the CIA's use of so-called "enhanced" interrogation techniques.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- For his new job as President Clinton's chief of staff, Leon E. Panetta insisted on -- and was given -- "full authority" to oversee personnel and policy decisions at the White House, he said yesterday.At a lunch with a group of reporters, Mr. Panetta said that Mr. Clinton had assured him that he would have the authority "a chief of staff needs to do the job."If so, this would represent a change in Mr. Clinton's presidential style. Under the tenure of the departing chief of staff, Thomas F. "Mack" McLarty III, several White House officials have conceded, the lines of authority were not well-defined, and the final say-so did not always rest with the man the staff affectionately called "Mack."
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | June 30, 1994
At Frank's Seafood, a wholesale fish market near Jessup, Joanne Choate wipes perspiration off her brow and holds up a finger in my direction. "I'll be with you in a minute," she says.She is standing near the center of the store with some customers, scooping live crabs out of a gigantic tub. The crabs seem irritated -- they wave their claws, they scuttle over each other, they clank against the metal sides of the tub like unruly inmates.A radio is playing the Beatles' "Can't Buy Me Love."L "One more second," Ms. Choate says, as more customers enter.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 8, 2009
President-elect Barack Obama secured the support of Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a California Democrat, for his choice to head the CIA yesterday, significantly improving the odds that former California congressman Leon E. Panetta will be the next chief of the spy service. Feinstein, who as chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee will preside over Panetta's confirmation hearing, said yesterday that she had spoken with Panetta by phone and that she would support his confirmation. "I believe all systems are go," she said in an interview at the Capitol.
NEWS
January 7, 2009
Leon E. Panetta has shown himself to be an astute, accomplished and politically adept public servant. But all his management skills and political acumen can't make up for what he lacks as President-elect Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Central Intelligence Agency - real experience in the spy business. The much-maligned agency gets more right than it gets credit for and could use an outsider to assess its problems and challenges in the post-9/11 world. But without a mastery of the basic techniques of intelligence-gathering and an understanding of the conflicts within the bureaucracy, Mr. Panetta would be hard-pressed to inspire its professionals and re-invigorate their pursuit of its mission.
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